Mac OS X Programming Unix

Mac DevOps Conference

There’s another new conference in town! Well, not my town, but Vancouver. MacDev Ops is a hot topic. One that will only increase in the coming years. Thanks to Mat X and Brian Warsing for bringing about a brilliant conference.

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The conference will be held on June 19, 2015 and is an easy $99 if you sign up soon. Also, submit a talk if DevOps is your thing. They’re looking to bring the following topics to the table:

  • Puppet, Chef and other automation from Desktop to Cloud and back
  • Software deployment with Munki and AutoPkg: the app ecosystem surrounding it
  • Cool tools: demo of awesome Mac Admin projects from GitHub
  • DevOps: How to adopt Automation and Best practices in IT operations
  • Dev skills: workshops on Ruby, Git, Python, Javascript for Mac Admins
  • MDM: Profiles and Mac configuration management in the cloud

This is sure to be a good one. Check it out here!

certifications iPhone Mac OS X Microsoft Exchange Server

New Microsoft Office for Mac and iOS Accreditation via MacTech

I recently got the announcement of the new official Microsoft Office Accreditation through MacTech. I was lucky enough to sit in on the previous version of this, so thought I’d push out the information on it. It’s attached to the MacTech Pro Events that MacTech has been running:

MacTech_Pro_Events-150

As you know, Microsoft released a public preview of Office 2016 for Mac. MacTech and Microsoft have created a new accreditation for Apple techs called “Microsoft Office for Mac and iOS Accredited Support Professional, 2015.” Prior to the public Office 2016 announcement, we did a preview of this new course under NDA in Seattle earlier this month.

We’re now announcing the new accreditation — which covers not only Office for Mac (2011 and 2016), but also Office for iOS and Office 365. In short, anyone that supports others using Microsoft Offie on OS X or iOS should get attend and get this accreditation.

If you’re interested, check it out here http://pro.mactech.com/microsoft-office-accreditation/

PS – You can actually hear Neal’s voice when you read it! ;)

Bushel Interviewing Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Part 1: Interviewing Pepijn Bruienne

I count myself very lucky that I got to interview Pepijn Bruienne, who interviewed me some time ago. Both, on the AFP548 podcast. Here’s the first part of me interviewing Pepijn!

personal

Mac Admin Meets Jägermeister

Charles corrupts all the admins (click for the animation – it’s beautiful).

Allister

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

X World: See You At The Sydney Mac Conference

I’ll be doing a couple of presentations in Sydney on July 9th and 10th at X World. Judging from the sessions in past years, it looks to be a great time that’s sure to make you smarter!

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If you’re able, check it out at http://auc.edu.au/xworld/about/.

Windows Server

Get Hyperion Enterprise to Run on Windows 2008 64 bit

Hyperion Enterprise is still a 32-bit app. So to get it to run in IIS, you’ll need to make sure that 32 bit apps can run in those containers. To enable 32-bit apps in IIS, run the following command (assuming that IIS is installed in the default location and that your Windows directory is C:\Windows:

C:\Windows\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config - section:applicationPools - applicationPoolDefaults.enable32BitAppOnWin64:true

If you need to undo this for any reason, simply run the following from a Windows command prompt:

C:\Windows\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config - section:applicationPools - applicationPoolDefaults.enable32BitAppOnWin64:true

Note: You’ll obviously need to be an admin (or elevate your privileges) to run these commands.

Ubuntu Unix

See Version Information In Linux

There are a number of ways to see information about what version of Linux that you’re running on different

cat /etc/lsb-release

Which returns the distribution information, parsed as follows:

DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=12.04.5
DISTRIB_CODENAME=precise
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS)"

LSB_release can also be run as a command, as follows:

lsb_release -a

Which returns the following:

No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS)
Release: 12.04.5
Codename: precise

lab_release can be used as a command as well:

cat /etc/issue.net

Which returns:

Ubuntu Precise Pangolin
(development branch)

In Debian, you can simply look at the version file:

cat /etc/debian_version

Which returns the following:

wheezy/sid

Or Red Hat Enterprise can also be located with /etc/issue.net:

cat /etc/issue.net

With many variants, including OS X, you can also use uname to determine kernel extensions, etc:

uname -a

The thing I’ve learned about Linux is that there’s always a better way to do things. So feel free to comment on your better way or favorite variant!

Articles and Books iPhone

Learning iOS Security Now Shipping

The latest book, Learning iOS Security is now available on Amazon, Packt, etc. One of my better writing experiences, so thanks to all for making it so! Buy it here, if you’re into iOS Security and all that kind of fun stuff.

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Uncategorized

Yet Another Awesome Kickstarter

$8,782,571 funded from a $10,000 goal. Sweet.

Windows Server Windows XP

Package Manager Like apt-get For Windows 10

In Windows 10, Microsoft has finally baked a package manager called OneGet into Windows. It works similarly to apt-get and other package managers that have been around for decades in the Linux world; just works in PowerShell, rather than bash. So let’s take a quick peak. First, import it as a module from a PowerShell prompt:

Import-Module -Name OneGet

Next, use Get-Command to see the options for the OneGet Module:

Get-Command -Module OneGet

This will show you the following options:

Find-Package
Get-Package
Get-PackageProvider
Get-PackageSource
Install-Package
Register-PackageSource
Save-Package
Set-PackageSource
Uninstall-Package
Unregister-PackageSource

Next, look at the repositories of package sources you have:

Get-PackageSource

You can then add a repo to look at, using Register-PackageSource. Or, we’ll just fire away at locating our first package, Acrobat:

Find-Package -Name AdobeReader

Or you could pipe that output to the Install-Package option:

Find-Package -Name AdobeReader | Install-Package

Or Firefox, verbosely:

Install-Package -Name Firefox -Verbose

Or ASP.NET MVC silently (using -Force):

Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc -Force

In some cases, you can also use the -Version option to define a specific version, which is why I ended up writing this in the first place – swapping between versions of asp has been a bit of a pain since the introduction of its first update, it seems…
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