Bushel iPhone

Ground Control + Bushel = A Comprehensive iOS Management Solution

Bushel is a Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution. We can manage all kinds of cool things, but there are a few things we can’t do. These include:

  • Controlling where app badges are on screens
  • Enrolling without first entering a wi-fi password
  • Supervising devices that aren’t managed using Apple’s Device Enrollment Program (DEP)
  • Updating iOS devices (iPads, iPhones, iPod Touches) to the latest operating system

Apple Configurator can do many of these tasks, but has limitations. There’s a tool out there called GroundControl. GroundControl is super-simple to use, like Bushel. GroundControl can deploy a backup to a device, which is how it controls where badges are on screens. GroundControl can also provide the wi-fi credentials to get on a network, places devices into supervision (so Bushel can easily manage Activation Lock Bypass on non-DEP enabled devices), and can erase and update devices. In short, GroundControl closes a lot of the gaps we have. On the flip side, GroundControl cannot manage settings over the air, which is what Mobile Device Management is all about.

So let’s look at what all this looks like. Before we get started, if you’re going to follow along, know that you’ll need to wipe an iOS device in order to supervise the device, which GroundControl will want to do by default. And when we’re done, if you want to unsupervise your test device, you’ll need to wipe it as well. So, get a GroundControl account and login. Once logged in, we’ll create a Payload, associate it with a Launchpad and create a Policy to deploy it. The payload is a collection of all the tasks you’ll perform on a device. Click Payloads and then New Payload, to create your first payload. When prompted, use the “Add an item…” button to add tasks to what a given payload will do.

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In this example, we’ve uploaded a Backup. and will now add a Restore from Backup task.

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Then choose an image to restore or use the Upload new Restore Image option to upload a new one.

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Next, we’re going to add a Wi-Fi payload so that our devices will automatically join our wireless networks. To do so, use the Add WiFi button in the “Add an Item…” menu. When prompted, provide the information for your wireless network, or upload a profile with the information in it.

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When you have entered all of the required information for your wireless network, click Save. Then let’s add an enrollment profile, which will automatically enroll devices into Bushel. To do so, open your Bushel account and click on Enroll this device. When prompted, provide a name and email address and then click on the button to Download Configuration Profile.

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When the profile downloads, use the “Add an Item…” menu back in the GroundControl web interface and select “Add Configuration Profile.” Here, choose Upload new Configuration Profile in the Add Configuration Profiles screen.

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When prompted, select the profile you just downloaded.

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Back at the Configuration Profiles screen, click on Save. Then, click Save Payload to save the changes you just made to your payload. Next, click LAUNCHPADS in the top menu bar. Here, click Download LaunchPad Mac 1.7.1 (or whatever version you see once a new one is released). Once downloaded, run and click on the button to Start Service.

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Once started, you’ll see the LaunchPad listed in the web interface.

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Click on your LaunchPad.

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Click on Edit LaunchPad. At the Edit Launchpad screen, choose the appropriate timezone and provide any tags that might be needed. You can also use the Name field to define which station that a given launchpad might run on.

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Click Save and then click on Policies. The policy binds the payload to the launchpad. Here, we’ll use the default. click on it to

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At the Select a Default Payload screen, select the payload you just created and then click Save.

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With the GroundControl Launchpad screen open, make sure the service is started and then plug in an iPad that is wiped and not yet activated into the system.

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The device should skip activation, install your backup (aka image) and then apply the payloads you’ve configured. The end result should be a device enrolled into Bushel, complete with email, security settings and more.

Overall, we find that Bushel is perfectly useable as a standalone tool. And we find that Apple Configurator can be a great tool according to what you need. But as Bushel makes it easier to own devices for Non-IT device administrators than does Profile Manager, GroundControl makes it easier to setup a lot of devices than does its free alternative. If you’ll be working with a lot of iOS devices, then we couldn’t recommend GroundControl more!

Uncategorized

Ant-Man

So looking forward to Paul Rudd as an Avenger…

Articles and Books public speaking

Session On The Changing World Of Publishing At MinneBar

I’ve long been an attendee and supporter of MinneBar, a Barcamp in Minneapolis. This year, I’ll be doing a presentation on publishing in the tech world. If you live here in town, I’d love to see you there!

http://sessions.minnestar.org/sessions/187

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Also, JAMF Software is a sponsor, so if you’d like to talk JAMF or Bushel, I’m of course always excited to discuss both!

Mac OS X Programming Unix

Mac DevOps Conference

There’s another new conference in town! Well, not my town, but Vancouver. MacDev Ops is a hot topic. One that will only increase in the coming years. Thanks to Mat X and Brian Warsing for bringing about a brilliant conference.

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The conference will be held on June 19, 2015 and is an easy $99 if you sign up soon. Also, submit a talk if DevOps is your thing. They’re looking to bring the following topics to the table:

  • Puppet, Chef and other automation from Desktop to Cloud and back
  • Software deployment with Munki and AutoPkg: the app ecosystem surrounding it
  • Cool tools: demo of awesome Mac Admin projects from GitHub
  • DevOps: How to adopt Automation and Best practices in IT operations
  • Dev skills: workshops on Ruby, Git, Python, Javascript for Mac Admins
  • MDM: Profiles and Mac configuration management in the cloud

This is sure to be a good one. Check it out here!

certifications iPhone Mac OS X Microsoft Exchange Server

New Microsoft Office for Mac and iOS Accreditation via MacTech

I recently got the announcement of the new official Microsoft Office Accreditation through MacTech. I was lucky enough to sit in on the previous version of this, so thought I’d push out the information on it. It’s attached to the MacTech Pro Events that MacTech has been running:

MacTech_Pro_Events-150

As you know, Microsoft released a public preview of Office 2016 for Mac. MacTech and Microsoft have created a new accreditation for Apple techs called “Microsoft Office for Mac and iOS Accredited Support Professional, 2015.” Prior to the public Office 2016 announcement, we did a preview of this new course under NDA in Seattle earlier this month.

We’re now announcing the new accreditation — which covers not only Office for Mac (2011 and 2016), but also Office for iOS and Office 365. In short, anyone that supports others using Microsoft Offie on OS X or iOS should get attend and get this accreditation.

If you’re interested, check it out here http://pro.mactech.com/microsoft-office-accreditation/

PS – You can actually hear Neal’s voice when you read it! ;)

Bushel Interviewing Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Part 1: Interviewing Pepijn Bruienne

I count myself very lucky that I got to interview Pepijn Bruienne, who interviewed me some time ago. Both, on the AFP548 podcast. Here’s the first part of me interviewing Pepijn!

personal

Mac Admin Meets Jägermeister

Charles corrupts all the admins (click for the animation – it’s beautiful).

Allister

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

X World: See You At The Sydney Mac Conference

I’ll be doing a couple of presentations in Sydney on July 9th and 10th at X World. Judging from the sessions in past years, it looks to be a great time that’s sure to make you smarter!

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If you’re able, check it out at http://auc.edu.au/xworld/about/.

Windows Server

Get Hyperion Enterprise to Run on Windows 2008 64 bit

Hyperion Enterprise is still a 32-bit app. So to get it to run in IIS, you’ll need to make sure that 32 bit apps can run in those containers. To enable 32-bit apps in IIS, run the following command (assuming that IIS is installed in the default location and that your Windows directory is C:\Windows:

C:\Windows\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config - section:applicationPools - applicationPoolDefaults.enable32BitAppOnWin64:true

If you need to undo this for any reason, simply run the following from a Windows command prompt:

C:\Windows\system32\inetsrv\appcmd set config - section:applicationPools - applicationPoolDefaults.enable32BitAppOnWin64:true

Note: You’ll obviously need to be an admin (or elevate your privileges) to run these commands.

Ubuntu Unix

See Version Information In Linux

There are a number of ways to see information about what version of Linux that you’re running on different

cat /etc/lsb-release

Which returns the distribution information, parsed as follows:

DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=12.04.5
DISTRIB_CODENAME=precise
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS)"

LSB_release can also be run as a command, as follows:

lsb_release -a

Which returns the following:

No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS)
Release: 12.04.5
Codename: precise

lab_release can be used as a command as well:

cat /etc/issue.net

Which returns:

Ubuntu Precise Pangolin
(development branch)

In Debian, you can simply look at the version file:

cat /etc/debian_version

Which returns the following:

wheezy/sid

Or Red Hat Enterprise can also be located with /etc/issue.net:

cat /etc/issue.net

With many variants, including OS X, you can also use uname to determine kernel extensions, etc:

uname -a

The thing I’ve learned about Linux is that there’s always a better way to do things. So feel free to comment on your better way or favorite variant!