Articles and Books

2 New Take Control Books

From Take Control:

Apple Mail. It’s hard to get by on a Mac or iOS device without it. But living with Mail can be a recipe for hair-pulling frustration, whether because of connection failures caused by Mail’s mysteriously unreliable automatic settings detection or trying to figure out the difference between long and short swipes in the iOS version. No one knows more about Mail than Joe Kissell, and he has distilled his most important advice into the second edition of “Take Control of Apple Mail,” now completely revised and updated to explain Mail in 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8. 183 pages of goodness is only $15.

Point others here > http://tid.bl.it/tco-apple-mail

Apple’s Pages word processor built a loyal following because it wasn’t Microsoft Word, but Apple threw us a curveball with the release of Pages 5 for the Mac and Pages 2 for iOS, removing numerous features and shuffling the interface around. Michael Cohen has spent the last year spelunking through the depths of Pages on the Mac, in iOS, and in iCloud to ferret out what has changed, how to accomplish both everyday and complex word processing and layout tasks, and the best ways to work back and forth in all three versions of Pages via iCloud Drive in Yosemite and iOS 8. At 266 pages, “Take Control of Pages” comprehensively documents what you want to do in Pages for $20.

Point others here > http://tid.bl.it/tco-pages-info

Thank you for your support of the Take Control series, and may all your wishes comes true this holiday season!

Bushel

Mass Entroll iOS Devices Into Bushel

When you add a bunch of devices to an MDM, we call it mass enrolling. Adding iPads, iPhones and iPods to your Bushel can be done through Apple Configurator. Apple Configurator automates the enrollment process, but when working with Bushel the enrollment profile has the username and email address, if you’re using email. This means that you would only want to use a mass enrollment option with Bushel if you are not using email, if all of your users will have the same generic email address or if your users will enter their own email information.

As mentioned, an enrollment profile automatically adds your devices to your Bushel. To obtain the enrollment profile:

  • Log into your Bushel.
  • Click on Devices.
  • Click on Enroll for Enroll This Device.
  • Click on Enroll This Device.Bushel Enroll iPhone, iPad or iPod touch.
  • Once the profile is downloaded, it will automatically attempt to enroll the computer you are downloading it from in the Profiles System Preferences pane.

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.05.41 AM

  • Click on Cancel.
  • Click on the downloads link in Safari.
  • Click on your Downloads folder.

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.08.55 AM

  • You have now downloaded the .mobileconfig file that will enroll devices into your Bushel

Add the Profile To Apple Configurator:

To deploy the profile through Apple Configurator:

  • Open Apple Configurator.
  • Click on Supervise in the row of icons along the top of the screen.
  • Drag the profile (by default currently called MDM-iOS5.mobileconfig) from the Finder into the list of Profiles.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.21.09 AM
  • The profile then appears in Apple Configurator (in this example, called jasper Bushel Profile but would be called your organization’s name followed by Bushel Profile for you).

Deploy The Bushel Enrollment Profile Through Apple Configurator

Once the profile is installed in Apple Configurator, let’s deploy it. In this example, don’t configure any other options. To deploy:

  • Open Apple Configurator.
  • Click on Prepare.
  • Click on the Install Profiles button in the Profiles section of the Settings pane.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.24.37 AM
  • Click Next.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.25.02 AM
  • Check the box for the enrollment profile.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 11.25.48 AM
  • Click Next.
  • Follow the prompts on the screen of the device to install the profile.

If you then wish to remove the device from your Bushel (aka unenroll), simply remove the enrollment profile by opening the Settings app, scrolling down to the Profiles section and tapping on the Remove button for the profile you just installed.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Roundcube for OS X Server

The latest Roundcube installer for OS X Server is now available at http://topicdesk.com/downloads/roundcube. This update, which provides a pretty awesome WebMail interface to OS X Server’s Mail Service provides the following:

  • One installer that supports all Mavericks and Yosemite
  • Roundcube WebMail 1.0.3 installed as a WebApp
  • Automatically Configured Plugins
  • Roundcube CardDav: Server-based address books
  • Roundcube Managesieve: Server-side mail filtering and vacation messages
  • PHP and Roundcube Config automatically configured for a typical Mac installation
  • sqllite database – we no longer use Postgres
  • Integration with the Mail Service running on OS X Server
personal

Max Max Returns

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Minneapolis

Reboot Your Own Machine At MacMiniColo

Even a Mac needs to be rebooted sometimes. If you host a computer at Mac Mini Colo, it’s pretty easy to reboot. To reboot your system, log into your account with MacMini Colo.
Screen Shot 2014-12-10 at 8.56.40 AM
Once logged in, click on Computers and then click on the computer that you’d like to reboot. Then click on the Reboot button and confirm the reboot.

Screen Shot 2014-10-03 at 8.55.54 AM

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure

Simple Preflight and Sanity Checking in Scripts

I was recently building some preflight scripts and was looking to record some information about a machine live, before proceeding with a script. I found the cheapest way to determine information about architectures and chipsets when scripting preflight scripts for OS X to be the arch and machine commands respectively. For example, to verify the architecture is i386, use the arch command with no options:

/usr/bin/arch

Which simply outputs “i386”:

i386

To check the machine type, simply use the machine command:

/usr/bin/machine

Which outputs as follows:

x86_64h

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Scripted Country Geolocations Using OS X’s Built-In ip2cc

Recently I was working on a project where we were isolating IP addresses by country. In the process, I found an easy little tool built right into OS X called ip2cc. Using ip2cc, you can lookup what country an IP is in. To do so, simply run ip2cc followed by a name or ip address. For example, to lookup apple.com you might run:

ip2cc apple.com

Or to lookup Much Music, you might run:

ip2cc muchmusic.ca

The output would be:

IP::Country modules (v2.28)
Copyright (c) 2002-13 Nigel Wetters Gourlay
Database updated Wed May 15 15:29:48 2013

Name: muchmusic.com
Address: 199.85.71.88
Country: CA (Canada)

You can just get the country line:

ip2cc apple.com | grep Country:

To just get the country code:

ip2cc apple.com | grep Country: | awk '{ print $2 }'

Finally, ip2cc is located at /usr/bin/ip2cc so we’ll complicate things just a tad by replacing the hostname with the current IP (note that private IPs can’t be looked up, so this would only work if you’re rocking on a wan ip or feeding it what a curl from a service like whatismyip brings back):

ip2cc `ipconfig getifaddr en0` | grep Country: | awk '{ print $2 }'

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure Programming Ubuntu Unix

Opposite Day: Reversing Lines In Files

The other day, my daughter said “it’s opposite day” when it was time to do a little homework, trying to get out of it! Which reminded me of a funny little command line tool called rev. Rev reads a file and reverses all the lines. So let’s touch a file called rev ~/Desktop/revtest and then populate it with the following lines:

123
321
123

Now run rev followed by the file name:

rev ~/Desktop/revtest

Now cat it:

cat !$

Now rev it again:

rev !$

You go go forward and back at will for fun, much more fun than homework… Enjoy!

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Refresh OS X CRLs

I recently found an existing image with a lot of stale crl information. We couldn’t rebuild the image, so we decided to instead refresh all of the crl information. This information is stored in /var/db/crls/crlcache.db. Deleting the file turned out to be problematic so we needed to clear items out of the tables instead. While this could be done using a few different tools, it turns out there’s a command built into os x to take care of this process for us called crlrefresh.

To use crlrefresh to clean up stale crlinformation and fetch new crlinformation for all CRL and certificates, use:

crlrefresh rpvv

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

See How Long The Active User Has Logged In On A Mac

The following will grab you an integer of the number of hours an active user has logged into a computer:

user=$( ls -l /dev/console | awk '{ print $3 }' ) ; ac users $user | awk '{ print $2 }'