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JAMF Nation User Conference

As the largest Apple IT gathering in the world rapidly approaches, we want to give you an early glimpse into the great presentations at the JAMF Nation User Conference (JNUC).

We are excited to announce that we’ve added the first ten JNUC sessions to our site. With sessions for education and commercial organizations, you’re sure to find presentations to meet your needs. Highlights include best practices for preparing Macs for online testing, ways to bring Apple’s Volume Purchase Program (VPP) and Device Enrollment Program (DEP) to life in your environment, and methods for mitigating and addressing Mac security threats.

Haven’t registered yet? There’s still time, but hurry. We’re nearing our capacity. 

Secure your spot and start making your travel plansand accommodations before it’s too late. We hope you can make it!

RSVP Today

August 26th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X

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Emacs (not eMacs) is an open source project, bundled with every version of OS X. And it can’t be altered. I wrote about the Cookies recipe that Richard Stallman bundled with Emacs long ago. He also has some somewhat sexist dating tips and a bunch of other weird rantings that he bundled in there. But perhaps the best contribution is the games that Emacs comes with. These include doctor, dunnet (which would have been a great MMPORG), pong, snake, solitaire, tetris and the ever-so-popular gomoku.

These games are located in the /usr/share/emacs/22.1/lisp/play directory. But you don’t access the games directly. Instead, you use the emacs command. To get started, fire up Terminal, then run the emacs command:

emacs

At the “Welcome to GNU Emacs” screen (see below), you’re going to need to be very specific about the keys you use. Hit the Escape key.
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At the screen with the red text (see below), hit the x key.

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At the M-x prompt, type the name of the game I listed above that you’d like to play.

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Here, we’ll type snake.

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Press the Enter key and then you will be in the game.

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When it’s over, hit escape, then x and then type the name of the next game if you’d like to, such as tetris.

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August 20th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X

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I’ve been underwhelmed (if that’s a word) by the list of common ports used on the Apple platform recently, so I started my own. It’s available at http://krypted.com/guides/common-apple-ports/ if you’re interested. It’s also under the Tools menu of the site. And yes, I’m aware that I can cat /etc/services; this includes some rudimentary notes.

August 17th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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Recently, I had a bit of a problem with some code I was sending back and forth through Messages. This was caused by smart quotes, which replace single and double quotation marks with directional quotation marks. This can cause a lot of problems. To disable smart quotes:

defaults write com.apple.messageshelper.MessageController SOInputLineSettings -dict-add "automaticQuoteSubstitutionEnabled" -bool false

August 16th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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We tend to use a lot of commands in the Terminal app. That is, after all, what it’s there fore. And there’s a nice history of what we do. There are also a number of ways to view and manage the bash history. The simplest of which is the history command, which will show the previous commands run. Here, we’ll simply run it:

history

Keep in mind that this shows the history based on context, so if you sudo bash, you’ll potentially see a different history. You can also use the bash built-in fc command, which has the additional awesomeness of being able to edit and re-run commands from the history. To start, we’ll simply look at showing the last 16 commands using the -l option:

fc -l

You can also constraint entries in the output by specific line numbers. For example, to see lines 12 through 18, simply use them as the first two positions of the command after fc:

fc 12 18

You can load the history into an editor and remove or add entries using fc without any options:

fc

To exit the editor, hit control-z. I’ve written in the past about using substitution. For example, sudo !! to run the last command. fc can do some basic substitution as well. For example, use the -s to start substation and then enter a string, which will append whatever you like before a command. So the following would put sudo in front and re-run the previous command:

fc -s sudo

And let’s say that you were doing a find for a string of krypted. To then swap that string with charles:

fc -s krypted=charles

Overall, the bash history can be incredibly useful. I frequently pipe the output of a series of lines into a new file with a .sh at the end as a starting point for scripts and use these substitution options to save myself a bunch of time not retyping longer commands. Enjoy.

August 14th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Ubuntu, Unix

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I missed posting this one back in November. I’m slow… It’s from an interview I did a little while back. http://tech.mn/news/2014/11/04/jamf-software-bushel-apple-device-management/

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Mostly, these are placeholders so I can find interviews I’ve done easily… #bushel

August 11th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel, Interviewing, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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There’s a quick and easy IT Business Edge slideshow at http://www.itbusinessedge.com/slideshows/the-5-mobile-apps-you-really-need-for-smb-success.html that I helped with about 5 Mobile Apps You Really Need for SMB Success.

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Hope you enjoy!

August 10th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel, iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure

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Little article I/Bushel contributed to from Tech Republic covering considerations for small businesses looking to move to the Apple platform. It’s available at http://www.techrepublic.com/article/5-considerations-for-smbs-that-want-to-move-to-apple/#ftag=RSS56d97e7.

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August 9th, 2015

Posted In: Articles and Books, Interviewing, iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I’ve always found the easiest way to script the volume of an OS X computer (and when I say volume I mean sound level, not a logical volume created from partitioning a hard drive – but I have articles for scripting those as well) is using the osascript command to invoke an Applescript command that sets the volume to zero. To put some syntax around this:

osascript -e "set volume 0"

August 6th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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You can query whether a process is running by name. You can do this with ps and pipe the output to grep. It’s not hard, but you can do this more quickly with pgrep. You can also kill that process with pkill. Which includes the ability to send a signal.

So, let’s look at closing down iTunes with pkill:

pkill iTunes

Or we can send it with a signal (9):

pkill -9 iTunes

Or you could just grab the pid of a process by name:

pgrep Safari

It might display:

797

And that’s it. Easy Peasy.

August 2nd, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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