krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

In order to use the Apple Volume Purchase Program, you will need an MDM solution (Profile Manager, Casper, MobileIron, Meraki, FileWave, etc). Also, token options were traditionally for one to one (1:1) environments until iOS 9, which marked a change where you can now leverage per-device licensing. This removes the requirement that you need an Apple ID running on each device that you choose to install apps on. Suddenly, VPP is for multi-tenant environments. You can also use codes and options for iOS 7 and up as well as OS X 10.9 and up, but those will use Apple IDs. Also, if you install your vpptoken on OS X Server and you’re running that same vpptoken elsewhere, OS X Server will take all of the codes that have been issued for itself (feature or bug, you decide).

But this article isn’t about the fine print details of the new VPP. Instead, this article is about making Profile Manager work with your new VPP token. Before you get started, know that when you install your vpptoken, if it’s in use by another MDM, Profile Manager will unlicensed all apps with your other MDM. To get started, log into your VPP account. Once logged in, click on your account email address and then select Account Summary.

vpp1

Then, click on the Download Token link and your token will be downloaded to your ~/Downloads (or wherever you download stuff).

vpp2

Once you have your token, open the Server app and click on the Profile Manager service.

ProfileManager

Click on the checkbox for Distribute apps and books from the Volume Purchase Program.

VPP

At the VPP Managed Distribution screen, drag the .vpptoken file downloaded earlier into the screen.

token

Click Continue. The VPP code email address will appear in the screen. Click Done.

Back at the profile manager screen, you should then see that the checkbox is filled and you can now setup Profile Manager.

The rest of the configuration of Profile Manager is covered in a previous article.

Note: The account used to configure the VPP information is not tracked in any serveradmin settings.

September 27th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I’ve been light on posting here, mostly because I’ve been swamped with work, selling my old house, buying a new house, doing some crazy taxes, wrapping production on a new book and updating the Take Control of OS X Server book to Yosemite Server. Well, earlier this week I sold my house, got the next version of Bushel ready to rock and filed my taxes. Aaaaannnnnndddddd, the Yosemite version of Take Control Of OS X Server is now available at http://tid.bl.it/1xuCJUC.

Screen Shot 2015-02-05 at 2.24.54 PM

Boom. Will get back to my normally scheduled postings shortly!

February 5th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Thanks to all the awesome work from Adam and Tanya Engst, Tidbits announced today that my Take Control of OS X Server is now available! To quote some of the Tidbits writeup:

Some projects turn out to be harder than expected, and while Charles Edge’s “Take Control of OS X Server” was one of them, we’re extremely pleased to announce that the full 235-page book is now available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobipocket versions to help anyone in a home or small office environment looking to get started with Apple’s OS X Server.

As you’ll likely remember, we published this book chapter by chapter for TidBITS members, finishing it in early September (see “‘Take Control of OS X Server’ Streaming in TidBITS,” 12 May 2014). Doing so got the information out more quickly, broke up the writing and editing effort, and elicited reader comments that helped us refine the text.

Normally, we would have moved right into final editing and published the book quickly, but from mid-September on, our attention has been focused on OS X 10.10 Yosemite, iOS 8, and our new Take Control Crash Course series. We were working non-stop, and while we wanted to release “Take Control of OS X Server,” we felt it was more important to finish the books about Apple’s new operating systems for the thousands of people who rely on Take Control for technical assistance.

During that time, we had the entire book copyedited by Caroline Rose, who’s best known for writing and editing Inside Macintosh Volumes I through III at Apple and being the editor in chief at NeXT. Plus, we went over the book carefully to ensure that it used consistent terminology and examples, optimized the outline, and improved many of the screenshots.

The main problem with this delay was that Apple has now updated OS X Server from version 3.2.2 (Mavericks Server, which is what we used when writing the book) to 4.0 (Yosemite Server, which is all that works in Yosemite). Updating the book for Yosemite Server would delay it even longer. Luckily for us, veteran system administrators say that you should never upgrade OS X Server on a production machine right away. And even luckier, the changes in Yosemite Server turn out to be extremely minor (a sidebar in the Introduction outlines them), so those who want to get started now can use the instructions in the book with no problem. It’s also still possible to buy Mavericks Server and install it on a Mac running Mavericks, as long as you have the right Mac App Store link from the book. We are planning to update the book for Yosemite Server (which mostly involves retaking screenshots and changing the “mavserver” name used in examples) in early 2015 — it will be a free update for all purchasers.

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 7.59.44 PM

You can find out more about the book at http://www.takecontrolbooks.com/osx-server. An update will be due out in early 2015, so stay tuned for more!

November 24th, 2014

Posted In: Articles and Books, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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OS X Yosemite, running the Server app comes complete with lots of awesome features to help you get up and running, started and owning the configuration of Apple Servers. One such is the built-in options to help manage your servers. Open Server, click Help, then click Server Help. You can then search and browse for information about things you’d like to accomplish using the Help Center.

Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 9.53.11 PM

Now, click the arrow for each service for information about configuring that service. You will see an arrow for each service.

Click the arrow for more information on that specific service.

And just like that, simple and easy-to-use documentation, available live on OS X Server. You will, of course, need to be online to use it effectively.

November 3rd, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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Yosemite brings Xsan 4, which brings a new way to add clients to an Xsan. Xsan Admin is gone. From now on, instead of scanning the network using Xsan Admin. we’ll be adding clients using a Configuration Profile. This is actually a much more similar process to adding Xsan clients to a StorNext environment than it is to adding clients to Metadata Controllers running Xsan 3 and below. But instead of making a fsnameservers file, we’re plugging that information into a profile, which will do that work on the client on our behalf. To make the Xsan configuration profile, we’re going to use Profile Manager.

To get started, open the Profile Manager web interface and click on a device or device group (note, these are scoped to systems so cannot be used with users and user groups). Then click on the Settings tab for the object you’re configuring Xsan for.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.37.14 AM

Click Edit for the profile listed (Settings for <objectname>) and scroll down until you see the entry for Xsan.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.37.32 AM

From the Xsan screen, click Configure.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.37.41 AM

This next screen should look a little similar, in terms of the information you’ve plugged into the Xsan 4 setup screen. Simply enter the name of the Xsan in the Xsan Name field, the IP address or host names of your metadata controllers in the File System Name Servers field and the Authentication Secret from the Xsan screen in the Server app into the Authentication Secret field. Click OK to close the dialog.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.38.29 AM

Click Save to save your changes. Then you’ll see the Download button become clickable.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.44.15 AM

The profile will download to your ~/Downloads directory as Settings_for_<OBJECTNAME>.mobileconfig. So this was called test and will result in a name of Settings_for_test.mobileconfig. That profile will automatically attempt to install. If this is an MDC where you’re just using Profile Manager to bake a quick profile, or if you don’t actually want to install the profile yet, click Cancel.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.43.43 AM

If you haven’t worked with profiles that much, note that when you click Show Profile, it will show you what is in the profile and what the profile can do.

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 11.43.59 AM

Simply open this file on each client (once you test it of course) and once installed, they’ll automatically configure to join your Xsan. If you don’t have a Profile Manager server, you can customize this file for your environment (YMMV): Settings_for_test.mobileconfig

October 30th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server, Xsan

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OS X Yosemite running the Server app has a lot of scripts used for enabling services, setting states, changing hostnames and the like. Once upon a time there was a script for OS X Server called server setup. It was a beautiful but too simplistic kind of script. Today, much of that logic has been moved out into more granular scripts, kept in /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/ServerSetup, used by the server to perform all kinds of tasks. These scripts are, like a lot of other things in Yosemite Server. Some of these include the configuration of amavisd, docecot and alerts. These scripts can also be used for migrating services and data. Sometimes the scripts are in bash, sometimes ruby, sometimes perl and other times even python. And the scripts tend to change year over year/release over release.

One of the things that can can be useful about the scripts scattered throughout the Server app is to learn how the developers of OS X Server intend for certain tasks to occur.

Looking At Services

This is also where I learned that Apple had put an Open Directory backup script in /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/server_backup/opendirectorybackup (that still requires a password). But what I haven’t seen in all of these logs is bumping up the logging level for services before performing tasks, so that you can see a verbose output of what’s going on. To do this, it looks like we’re going service-by-service. So let’s look alphabetically, starting with Address Book:

sudo serveradmin settings addressbook:DefaultLogLevel = “warn”

This by defualt logs to /var/log/caldavd/error.log, which is built based on the following, which sets the base:

sudo serveradmin settings addressbook:LogRoot=/var/log/caldavd

And the following, which sets the file name in that directory:

sudo serveradmin settings addressbook:ErrorLogFile=error.log

You can change either by changing what comes after the = sign. Next is afp. This service logs output to two places. The first is with errors to the service, using /Library/Logs/AppleFileService/AppleFileServiceError.log, the path designated in the following:

sudo serveradmin settings afp:errorLogPath = “/Library/Logs/AppleFileService/AppleFileServiceError.log”

The second location logs activities (open file, delete file, etc) rather than errors and is /Library/Logs/AppleFileService/AppleFileServiceAccess.log, defined using:

sudo serveradmin settings afp:activityLogPath = “/Library/Logs/AppleFileService/AppleFileServiceAccess.log”

The activity log is disabled by default and enabled using the command:

sudo serveradmin settings afp:activityLog = yes

The events that trigger log entries are in the afp:loggingAttributes array and are all enabled by default. There are no further controls for the verbosity of the afp logs. The next service is calendar. Similar to address book, the caldav server uses DefaultLogLevel to set how much data gets placed into logs:

sudo serveradmin settings calendar:DefaultLogLevel = “warn”

This by defualt logs to /var/log/caldavd/error.log, which is built based on the following, which sets the base:

sudo serveradmin settings calendar:LogRoot=/var/log/caldavd

And the following, which sets the file name in that directory:

sudo serveradmin settings calendar:ErrorLogFile=error.log

You can changing either by changing what comes after the = sign.
Profile Manager is called devicemgr in the serveradmin interface and I’ve found no way to augment the logging levels. Nor does its migration script ( /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/ServerSetup/MigrationExtras/80-devicemgrmigration.sh ) point to any increased logging during migration.

The dirserv (aka Open Directory) uses the slapconfig back-end, so I use slapconfig to increase logging:

sudo slapconfig -enableslapdlog

The DNS service uses named.conf, located in /etc to set log levels and has no serveradmin settings for doing so. Here, use the logging section and look for both the file setting (by default /Library/Logs/named.log) for where the log is stored as well as the severity setting, which can set the logging levels higher or lower.

By default Messages, or iChat Server, logs a lot. See the following for what is logged:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber:logLevel = “ALL”

Adding the -D option to the LaunchDaemon that invokes jabber will increase the logs. Logging long-term is handled in each of the xml files that make up the features of jabber. See the Logconfiguration section of the c2s file via:

cat /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/private/etc/jabberd/c2s.xml

The mail service has a number of options for logging, much of which has to do with the fact that it’s a patchy solution made up of postfix, etc. Global log locations are controlled using the mail:global:service_data_path key, which indicates a path that logs are stored in (as usual many of these are in /Library/Server):

sudo serveradmin settings mail:global:service_data_path = "/Library/Server/Mail"

To see the virus database logging levels (which should usually be set to warn):

sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:virus_db_log_level

To see the spamassassin logging levels:

sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:spam_log_level

To see the actual postfix logging level:

sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:log_level

To enable timestamps on logs:

sudo serveradmin settings mail:imap:logtimestamps = yes

To set the dovecot logging to info:

sudo serveradmin settings mail:imap:log_level = “info”

To set increased logging per function that dovecot performs, see the config files in /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/private/etc/dovecot/default/conf.d, each of which has a logging section to do so.

The NetBoot service is simple to configure logging for, simply set the netboot:logging_level to HIGH (by default it’s MEDIUM):

sudo serveradmin settings netboot:logging_level = “HIGH”

The Postgres service uses a log directory, configured with postgres:log_directory:

sudo serveradmin settings postgres:log_directory = “/Library/Logs/PostgreSQL”

The /private/etc/raddb/radiusd.conf has a section (log {}) dedicated to configuring how the radius service logs output.

The Xsan service logs output per volume to both the System Log and volume-based log files, stored in /Library/Preferences/Xsan/data.

The smb service has a file /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/com.apple.smb.server.plist with a key for log level that can be used for more verbose output of the service.

The PPTP VPN service logs output to the file specified in vpn:Servers, configured with these:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:LogFile = “/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log”
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LogFile = “/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log”
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:LogFile = “/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log”
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LogFile = “/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log”

By default, verbose logging is enabled, which you can see with:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:VerboseLogging
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:VerboseLogging
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:VerboseLogging
sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:VerboseLogging

The last service is web (Apache). The default access logs are per-site, with a key called customLogPath existing for each. The defaultSite uses the following for its logs:

sudo serveradmin settings web:defaultSite:customLogPath

Swap out the defaultSite with another site to see its log paths. There’s also a key for errorLogPath that shows errors. These are per-site so that administrators can provide access to logs for the owners of each site and not fear them having access to logs for other users. Global error logs are stored in /private/var/log/apache2/error_log as defined in /private/etc/apache2/httpd.conf. Find LogLevel in this file and set it to configure how in depth the logs will be, using debug for the most verbose and info, notice, warn, error, crit, alert, and emerg to get incrementally less information.

Additionally the log formats can be set in /private/etc/apache2/httpd.conf, allowing administrators to configure Yosemite Server’s built-in web service to conform to the standards of most modern web log analyzers.

Conclusion

Overall, there’s a lot of information in these logs and administrators can spend as much time reviewing logs as they want. But other than standard system logs, the output is typically configured on a service-by-service basis. Some services offer a lot of options and others offering only a few. Some services also offer options within the serveradmin environment while others use their traditional locations in their configuration files. I’ll end this with a warning. There can also be a lot of output in these logs. Therefore, if you set the logging facilities high, make sure to keep a watchful eye on the capacity of the location you’re writing logs out to. The reason I looked at paths to logs where applicable was because you might want to consider redirecting logs to an external volume when debugging so as not to fill up a boot volume and cause even more problems than what you’re likely parsing through logs looking to fix…

October 28th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Xsan

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The command to create and tear down an Open Directory environment is slapconfig. When you disable Open Directory from the Server app you aren’t actually removing users. To do so, you’d use slapconfig along with the -destroyldapserver. When run, you get a little insight into what’s happening behind the scenes. This results in the following:

bash-3.2# slapconfig -destroyldapserver

The logs are as follows:

2014-09-18 14:42:02 +0000 slapconfig -destroyldapserver
2014-09-18 14:42:02 +0000 CopyReplicaArray: ldap_search_ext_s failed
2014-09-18 14:42:02 +0000 Error retrieving replica array
2014-09-18 14:42:02 +0000 Deleting Cert Authority related data
2014-09-18 14:42:03 +0000 Removed directory at path /var/root/Library/Application Support/Certificate Authority/Take Control Books Open Directory Certification Authority.
2014-09-18 14:42:03 +0000 command: /usr/sbin/xscertadmin add --reason 5 --issuer Take Control Books Open Directory Certification Authority --serial 2127185704
CopyCARecordByName: get ldapi node code = 2100 description = Connection failed to node '/LDAPv3/ldapi://%2Fvar%2Frun%2Fldapi'
No such issuer - failed to revoke certificate
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 command: /bin/launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertd.plist
/System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertd.plist: Could not find specified service
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 command: /bin/launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertd-helper.plist
/System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertd-helper.plist: Could not find specified service
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 command: /bin/launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertadmin.plist
/System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.xscertadmin.plist: Could not find specified service
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 void _destroyLDAPServer(const char *): Failed to find computer record named YosemiteSam.krypted.com$: 0 (null)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Updating ldapreplicas on primary master
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 CopyLdapReplicas: Unable to create DSLDAPContainer: 77014 Can't contact LDAP server (-1)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 CopyPrimaryMaster: CopyLdapReplicas failed
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Unable to locate primary master
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Primary master node is nil!
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Unable to locate ldapreplicas record: 0 (null)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Error setting read ldap replicas array: 0 (null)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Error setting write ldap replicas array: 0 (null)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 ODRecord *_getODRecord(ODNode *, NSString *, NSString *, NSArray *): ODNodeRef parameter error
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 int _removeReplicaFromConfigRecord(ODNode *, NSString *): ODRecord not found
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Error synchronizing ldapreplicas: 0 (null)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removing self from the database
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Stopping LDAP server (slapd)
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Stopping password server
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed all service principals from keytab for realm YOSEMITESAM.KRYPTED.COM
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.001.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.002.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.003.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.004.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.005.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/__db.006.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/altSecurityIdentities.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-config-realname.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-generateduid.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-group-memberguid.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-group-nestedgroup.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-group-realname.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/apple-hwuuid.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/cn.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/DB_CONFIG.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/dn2id.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/entryCSN.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/entryUUID.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/gidNumber.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/givenName.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/id2entry.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/ipHostNumber.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/log.0000000001.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/macAddress.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/mail.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/memberUid.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/objectClass.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/ou.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/sn.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/uid.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/uidNumber.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.001.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.002.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.003.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.004.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.005.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/__db.006.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/alock.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/authGUID.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/DB_CONFIG.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/dn2id.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/draft-krbPrincipalAliases.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/draft-krbPrincipalName.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/entryCSN.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/entryUUID.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/id2entry.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/log.0000000001.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /var/db/openldap/authdata/objectClass.bdb.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed directory at path /var/db/openldap/authdata.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/openldap/slapd_macosxserver.conf.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/openldap/slapd.conf.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/openldap/rootDSE.ldif.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed directory at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d/cn=config.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d/cn=config.ldif.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed directory at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed directory at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d.backup/cn=config.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d.backup/cn=config.ldif.
2014-09-18 14:42:23 +0000 Removed directory at path /etc/openldap/slapd.d.backup.
2014-09-18 14:42:26 +0000 Stopping password server
2014-09-18 14:42:26 +0000 Removed file at path /etc/ntp_opendirectory.conf.
2014-09-18 14:42:26 +0000 Removed file at path /Library/Preferences/com.apple.openldap.plist.

October 21st, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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There are three ways to create users in Yosemite Server (the Server app running on Yosemite if you’re so bored you feel the need to try and correct me). The first is using the Server app, the second is using the Users & Groups System Preference pane and the third is using the command line. In this article we will look at creating users in the Server app.

To do so, open the Server app and connect to your server. Then click on the Users entry in the ACCOUNTS list. The list of users is displayed, based on the directory domain(s) being browsed. A directory domain is a repository of account data, which can include local users, local network users and users in a shared directory service such as Open Directory and Active Directory.

Users1

The drop-down list allows you to see objects that are stored locally as well as on a shared directory server. Click on the plus sign to create a new account in the chosen Directory Domain.

Users2

When prompted, provide the following information about the new user:

  • Full Name: Usually the first and last name of the user.
  • Account Name: A shorter representation of that name with no spaces or special characters.
  • Email addresses: The email address to use if the account is going over quotas, has calendar invitations sent, or used for email hosted on the server, etc.
  • Password: The password the user will use to access services on the server.
  • Verify: The password a second time to make sure there are no spelling errors.
  • Allow user to administer this server: Optional field that grants the user administrative access to the server.
  • Home Folder: Optional field that by default creates local home directories for users that use the account but that also allows you to select a directory shared using the File Sharing service as a location for home folders. Each user in OS X has a home folder, this option defines whether that folder will reside on their computer or on a central server.
  • Keywords: Tags to make it easier to find users (a new feature for the Server app in Yosemite Server, but an old feature in the old Workgroup Manager).
  • Disk Quota: Define the amount of space an account can take up on servers.
  • Notes: Any information you’d like to enter to remember things about the user.

Note: Optionally, you can also drag an image onto the image shown in the New User screen if you’d like the user to have an avatar as done in the above screenshot.

Once the account details are as you would like, click on the Done button. The account will then be displayed in the list of available accounts. If the server has not been made an Open Directory server then you can only create local users through the Server app.

Once the account is created, right-click click on the user to see the option to edit the account you just created, edit their access to services hosted on the server, configure email information and change their password.

Users3

Click Edit User. Here, you have two new features. You can add the user to groups and use the checkbox for “log in” to disable the account.

Users4

Click Cancel and then using the cog wheel menu while the user is highlighted, note that you can, click on Edit Access to Services. Here, uncheck each service that the user should not have access to. If the service isn’t running then it’s not a big deal. You can highlight multiple accounts concurrently and then use this option to disable services for users en masse. Here, you can also edit your user templates (which are settings inherited by new users who you select that template for) as well as edit advanced options, such as changing the UID, default group, short name, aliases, default shell and home directory path. As the screen indicates, only change this stuff if you know exactly what you’re doing.

Users5

October 20th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , ,

Getting started with Messages Server couldn’t really be easier. Messages Server in the OS X Yosemite version of the Server app uses the open source jabber project as their back-end code base (and going back, OS X has used jabber since the inception of iChat Server all the way through Server 3). The sqlite setup file is located at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/private/var/jabberd directory and the autobuddy binary is at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/bin/jabber_autobuddy. The actual jabberd binary is also stored at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/jabberd, where there are a couple of perl scripts used to migrate the service between various versions as well.

Setting up the Messages service is simple. Open the Server app and click on Messages in the Server app sidebar.

Messages1

Click on the Edit… button for the Permissions. Here, define which users and interfaces are allowed to use the service.

Once open, click on the checkbox for “Enable server-to-server federation” if you have multiple iChat, er, I mean, Messages servers and then click on the checkbox for “Archive all chat messages” if you’d like transcripts of all Messages sessions that route through the server to be saved on the server. You should use an SSL certificate with the Messages service. If enabling federation so you can have multiple Messages servers, you have to. Before enabling the service, click on the name of the server in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Settings tab. From here, click on Edit for the SSL Certificate (which should be plural btw) entry to bring up a screen to select SSL Certificates.

Messages2

At the SSL Certificates screen (here it’s plural!), select the certificate the Messages service should use from the available list supplied beside that entry and click on the OK button. If you need to setup federation, click back on the Messages service in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Edit button. Then, click on the checkbox for Require server-to-server federation (making sure each server has the other’s SSL certificate installed) and then choose whether to allow any server to federate with yours or to restrict which servers are allowed. I have always restricted unless I was specifically setting up a server I wanted to be public (like public as in everyone in the world can federate to it, including the gorram reavers that want to wear your skin).

Messages3

To restrict the service, then provide a list of each server address capable of communicating with your server. Once all the servers are entered, click the OK button.
Obviously, if you only have one server, you can skip that. Once the settings are as you wish them to be, click on the ON/OFF switch to light up the service. To see the status of the service, once started, use the fullstatus option with serveradmin followed by the jabber indicator:

sudo serveradmin fullstatus jabber

The output includes whether the service is running, the location of jabber log files, the name of the server as well as the time the service was started, as can be seen here:

jabber:state = "RUNNING"
jabber:roomsState = "RUNNING"
jabber:logPaths:PROXY_LOG = "/private/var/jabberd/log/proxy65.log"
jabber:logPaths:MUC_STD_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:logPaths:JABBER_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:proxyState = "RUNNING"
jabber:currentConnections = "0"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort1 = "0"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort2 = "0"
jabber:pluginVersion = "10.8.211"
jabber:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
jabber:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "mavserver.pretendco.lan"
jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "mavserver.pretendco.lan"
jabber:setStateVersion = 1
jabber:startedTime = ""
jabber:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1

There are also a few settings not available in the Server app. One of these that can be important is the port used to communicate between the Messages client and the Messages service on the server. For example, to customize this to 8080, use serveradmin followed by settings and then jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080, as follows:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080

To change the location of the saved Messages transcripts (here, we’ll set it to /Volumes/Pegasus/Book:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber:savedChatsLocation = “/Volumes/Pegasus/Book”

To see a full listing of the options, just run settings with the jabber service:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber

The output lists each setting configurable:

jabber:dataLocation = "/Library/Server/Messages"
jabber:s2sRestrictDomains = no
jabber:jabberdDatabasePath = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/sqlite/jabberd2.db"
jabber:sslCAFile = "/etc/certificates/mavserver.pretendco.lan.10E6CDF9F6E84992B97360B6EE7BA159684DCB75.chain.pem"
jabber:jabberdClientPortTLS = 5222
jabber:sslKeyFile = "/etc/certificates/mavserver.pretendco.lan.10E6CDF9F6E84992B97360B6EE7BA159684DCB75.concat.pem"
jabber:initialized = yes
jabber:enableXMPP = no
jabber:savedChatsArchiveInterval = 7
jabber:authLevel = "STANDARD"
jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "mavserver.pretendco.lan"
jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 5223
jabber:requireSecureS2S = no
jabber:savedChatsLocation = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/message_archives"
jabber:enableSavedChats = no
jabber:enableAutoBuddy = no
jabber:s2sAllowedDomains = _empty_array
jabber:logLevel = "ALL"
jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "mavserver.pretendco.lan"
jabber:eventLogArchiveInterval = 7
jabber:jabberdS2SPort = 0

To stop the service:

sudo serveradmin stop jabber

And to start it back up:

sudo serveradmin start jabber

It’s also worth noting something that’s completely missing in this whole thing: Apple Push Notifications… Why is that important? Well, you use the Messages application to communicate not only with Mac OS X and other jabber clients, but you can also use Messages to send text messages. Given that there’s nothing in the server that has anything to do with texts, push or anything of the sort, it’s worth noting that these messages don’t route through the server and therefore still require an iCloud account. Not a huge deal, but worth mentioning that Messages server doesn’t have the same updates built into the Messages app. Because messages don’t traverse the server, there’s no transcripts.

October 19th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The logs in Xcode Server (Server 3) by default point to /Library/Server/XcodeLogs/credserver.log. This takes all of the output from xcscredd and xcscredhandler. If you’re doing a lot of debugging then logs can be pointed to another location, such as another drive. The path to the logs is defined in the /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/LogConfiguration directory. The file to edit is a standard property list, XCSCredentialServer.plist:

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″?>

<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC “-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN” “http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd”>

<plist version=”1.0″>

<dict>

<key>claimedFacilities</key>

<array>

<string>servermgrd</string>

<string>servermgr-listener</string>

<string>servermgr-notify</string>

</array>

<key>claimedSenders</key>

<array>

<string>servermgrd</string>

<string>servermgr-listener</string>

<string>servermgr-notify</string>

</array>

<key>logMaximumLevel</key>

<string>debug</string>

<key>logPath</key>

<string>/Library/Server/Logs/servermgrd.log</string>

</dict>

</plist>

Once open, look for a key called logPath. Change that to the desired path, such as /Volumes/MyDrive/Logs/credserver.log and then restart the service:

serveradmin stop xcode; serveradmin start xcode

October 18th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , ,

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