krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

A number of environments need to disable the Notification Center and Action Center features in Windows 10. This can be done using the registry editor or using a Group Policy Object (GPO).

First let’s look at doing so with the registry. As with any mucking around with the registry, when editing, I strongly recommend backing up the registry and/or creating a restore point first. Once done, click Run, enter regedit and hit Enter to open the Registry Editor.

Next, right-click on the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Explorer registry key and create a new DWORD (32-bit) key. Call the key DisableNotificationCenter and provide the number 1 as the value. Then quit the Registry Editor and restart. Notification Center and Action Center should then be disabled. Simply delete that key and reboot in order to go back.

If the Group Policy Editor is available, click Run and enter gpedit.msc. Then open the User Configuration, navigate to Administrative Templates, click on Start Menu and then choose Taskbar. Open Remove Notifications and Action Center, and move the Enabled option to Disable (if disabling of course). You can then run gpupdate or reboot to see the change.

January 2nd, 2017

Posted In: Windows Server, Windows XP

Tags: , ,

Leave a Comment

In Windows 10, Microsoft has finally baked a package manager called OneGet into Windows. It works similarly to apt-get and other package managers that have been around for decades in the Linux world; just works in PowerShell, rather than bash. So let’s take a quick peak. First, import it as a module from a PowerShell prompt:

Import-Module -Name OneGet

Next, use Get-Command to see the options for the OneGet Module:

Get-Command -Module OneGet

This will show you the following options:

Find-Package
Get-Package
Get-PackageProvider
Get-PackageSource
Install-Package
Register-PackageSource
Save-Package
Set-PackageSource
Uninstall-Package
Unregister-PackageSource

Next, look at the repositories of package sources you have:

Get-PackageSource

You can then add a repo to look at, using Register-PackageSource. Or, we’ll just fire away at locating our first package, Acrobat:

Find-Package -Name AdobeReader

Or you could pipe that output to the Install-Package option:

Find-Package -Name AdobeReader | Install-Package

Or Firefox, verbosely:

Install-Package -Name Firefox -Verbose

Or ASP.NET MVC silently (using -Force):

Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc -Force

In some cases, you can also use the -Version option to define a specific version, which is why I ended up writing this in the first place – swapping between versions of asp has been a bit of a pain since the introduction of its first update, it seems…
PowerShell logo

February 26th, 2015

Posted In: Windows Server, Windows XP

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,