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Blueprints are a new option in Apple Configurator 2. Blueprints allow you setup a template of settings, options, apps, and restore data, and then apply those Blueprints on iOS devices. For example, if you have 1,000 iOS devices, you can create a Blueprint with a restore item, an enrollment profile, a default wallpaper, skip all of the activation steps, install 4 apps, and then enabling encrypted backups. The Blueprint will provide all of these features to any device that the Blueprint is applied to. But then why not call it a group? Why call it a Blueprint? Because the word template is boring. And you’re not dynamically making changes to devices over the air. Instead you’re making changes to devices when you apply that Blueprint, or template to the device. And you’re building a device out based on the items in the Blueprint, so not entirely a template. But whatever on semantics. To get started, open Apple Configurator 2. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.00.24 PM Click on the Blueprints button and click on Edit Blueprints. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.00.33 PM Notice that when you’re working on Blueprints, you’ll always have a blue bar towards the bottom of the screen. Blueprints are tiled on the screen, although as you get more and more of them, you can view them in a list. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.00.47 PM Right-click on the Blueprint. Here, you’ll have a number of options. As you can see below, you can then Add Apps. For more on adding Apps, see this page. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.00.55 PM You can also change the name of devices en masse, using variables, which I explore in this article. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.01.11 PM For supervised devices, you can also use your Blueprints to change the wallpaper of devices, which I explore here. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.01.21 PM Blueprints also support using Profiles that you save to your drive and then apply to the Blueprints. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.01.29 PM Blueprints also support restoring saved backups onto devices, as I explore here. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.01.39 PM For kiosk and single purpose systems, you can also enter into Single App Mode programmatically. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 1.02.25 PM   You can also configure automated enrollment, as described here. Overall, Blueprints make a great new option in Apple Configurator 2. These allow you to more easily save a collection of settings that were previously manually configured in Apple Configurator 1. Manually configuring settings left room for error, so Blueprints should keep that from happening.

November 11th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Configurator, Mac OS X, Mass Deployment

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Terminal screens can use backgrounds in OS X Lion. To configure these settings, open Terminal and choose Preferences from the Terminal menu. Then click on the Window tab. Use the Image drop down to select Choose. This brings up a browse dialog box that you can use to choose an image. Browse to the image and then click on Open. Choose images that are pretty much all dark or all light as your font should be the opposite color.

August 9th, 2011

Posted In: Mac OS X

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