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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Installing OS X has never been easier than it got in Yosemite, when the installers were moved to the App Store. And since then it’s just gotten easier, and easier. In this article, we’ll upgrade a Mac from OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) to macOS Sierra (10.12), the latest and greatest. The first thing you should do is clone your system (especially if you’re upgrading a server). The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. The fourth thing you should do is test that clone again…

Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading “Install macOS Sierra” from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install macOS Sierra sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

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Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install Sierra).

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At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Sierra for you).

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At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds (I’m sure it happens).

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At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot.

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And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff!

September 28th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Installing OS X has never been easier than in Yosemite. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.10 (Yosemite) to OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) to . The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X El Capitan from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X El Capitan sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.27.08 PM

Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X El Capitan).

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At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no El Capitan for you).

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At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

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At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot.

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And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff!

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October 11th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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The first Apple Watch update appeared a few days ago. This update brings with it “improved performance” for Siri, different elements of activity tracking, accessibility and third party support. 1.0.1 also brings Brazilian Portugese, Danish, Dutch, Swedish, Russian, Thai and Turkish language support. And a few minor security issues were addressed. In short, you might want to run this one… To do so, first make sure your phone is close (less than 20 feet in my opinion) and that the watch has at least half a charge.

To run the upgrade, start by opening the Apple Watch app on your iPhone. From the default screen (My Watch), tap on General and then tap on Software Update.

From the Software Update screen, tap on Download and Install and let the watch do it’s thing (note, you’ll be prompted for a passcode if you have one configured). The update usually takes around 15 minutes. Don’t reboot or get the phone more than 20 feet from the watch during the update. Enjoy your Brazilian Portuguese!

May 29th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

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Installing OS X has never been easier than in Yosemite. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) to OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

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Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite).

Install1

At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you).

Install2

At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

Install3

At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot.

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And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff!

Install5

November 5th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mass Deployment

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Setting up OS X Server has never been easier. Neither has upgrading OS X Server. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.8 or 10.9 running Server 2 or Server 3 to OS X 10.10 (Mavericks) running Server 4.

The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. The fourth thing you should do is repeat all that and triple check that your data is there!

Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. I would also purchase the Server app first while Yosemite is downloading. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.15.56 PM Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.09.18 PM

Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.46 PMAt the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.48 PMAt the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.52 PMAt the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot and do some installation fun stuff.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.54 PMOnce done and you’re looking at the desktop, download the latest version of the Server app you should have purchased previously, if you haven’t already. Then open it.

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If prompted that the Server app was replaced, click OK. Then open the app.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.52 PMAt the Update screen, click Continue (assuming this is the server you’re upgrading).

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.09 PMAt the Licensing screen, click Agree.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.12 PMWhen prompted for an administrator account, provide the username and password of an administrator and click OK.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.28.07 PMWhen the app opens, verify DNS (absolutely the most important element of this upgrade), etc and then check that configured services still operate as intended. If you end up deciding that you no longer need OS X Server, just delete the app and the contents of /Library/Server and you’re good. Handle with Care.

November 4th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure, Xsan

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In OS X you’ve always had this weird shroud of the “Classic” environment. This type of environment was used to facilitate running things in the previous incarnation of Apple’s operating systems. Many of these have disappeared over the years. In Mavericks we see  yet another go away in a very small an almost noticeable binary, bless. While this command conjures fears of getting excommunicated by a Borgia for many, for those of us in the Apple community, the bless command is used to define a folder to mount to boot to.

In 10.8 and below, there was an option to bless –folder9, used to define a OS 9/Classic system folder. Given that you can’t run those operating systems on hardware that runs 10.9 Mavericks, Apple has finally managed to rid even its most religious sounding binary of all traces of OS 9.

Hallelujah!

No, I’m not done yet. There’s one more thing. –bootBlockFile, –save9–saveX and –use9 are also gone now as they’re legacy (pretty much for OS 9) and no longer required.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Setting up OS X Server has never been easier. Neither has upgrading OS X Server. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.8 running Server 2 to OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) running Server 3.

The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Mavericks from the App Store. I would also purchase the Server app first while Mavericks is downloading. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Mavericks sitting in LaunchPad.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.32 PM

Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Mavericks).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.46 PMAt the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.48 PMAt the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.52 PMAt the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot and do some installation fun stuff.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.54 PMOnce done, download the latest version of the Server app, if you haven’t already.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.28 PMIf prompted that the Server app was replaced, click OK. Then open the app.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.52 PMAt the Update screen, click Continue (assuming this is the server you’re upgrading).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.54 PMAt the Licensing screen, click Agree.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.58 PMWhen prompted for an administrator account, provide the username and password of an administrator and click OK.

Screen Shot 2013-10-05 at 9.39.23 PMWhen the app opens, verify DNS, etc and then check that configured services still operate as intended. If you end up deciding that you no longer need OS X Server, just delete the app and the contents of /Library/Server and you’re good. Handle with Care.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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Now that we’ve looked at what you get and what you don’t get in Mountain Lion Server, let’s take a little while to look at what the upgrade path itself looks like. Before we start, let’s just say that upgrading to Mountain Lion Server is probably one of the fastest, easiest and most boring upgrades you’ll ever get to do. And I say this more to the credit of the engineers that made the process so simple. Apparently there are bonuses to your Server just being an app. There is a catch, some of the services are gone. Another catch, you’re gonna’ need to have a system that meets the following specs:

  • Capable of booting a 64-bit kernel, means a 64-bit Intel Core 2 Duo or better
  • The graphics just keep getting better, so you’ll need an Advanced GPU chipset
  • The more memory the better, although 2GB is the bare minimum
  • The more CPU the better, although 8GB of space is required
  • An Internet connection, or a cached Install Mac OS X Mountain Lion, Server app and Server package – much easier to just have a connection to the Internet…
  • You should plan on using an Apple ID, although if you don’t supply it at install time, the server can still run
  • The source computer needs 10.6.8 or 10.7.x

Apple’s official specs are here, outlining the models that Mountain Lion can run on. If Mountain Lion can run, OS X Server can run on it. Next, make a clone of your computer. I use Carbon Copy Cloner, like most sane people, but YMMV with other tools that you may be in love with. Once your clone is done, I personally like to do both an archive and an export of user accounts from Workgroup Manager as a final safety net. You should also have a book. Preferably one of mine, although given that the merging of two such boring topics can create a black hole of boringness (which is similar to turning a bag of holding inside out, btw), you might choose to bring something a bit livelier than either of the two, like some Dostoyevsky or the Chem 111 textbook I used in college.

Next, let’s go to the App Store. Search for Mountain Lion or OS X and then click the Install button for the Mountain Lion app. The button will then say Downloading, as follows:

Buy OS X Mountain Lion from the App Store

Buy OS X Mountain Lion from the App Store

Once downloaded, make sure your users won’t chase after you with pitchforks for being down for a couple of hours and then run the installer, following the defaults until the download begins and the system reboots. The installation will take a little while. From the time you start the download to the time that the files are unpacked and replaced on the system can be about an hour or two. This is a good time to grab that book, a bag of Doritos and a Dr. Pepper. Once the Doritos are gone, wash your hands and check the progress of the installation. Read some more. Once that’s done, check the progress again. If you think about a second bag of Doritos, stop – it’s not worth it… A second Dr. Pepper is fine though, I hear it helps you write articles about upgrading to Mountain Lion Server in a way that makes optimal sense.

Once the system reboots again, you should be ready to open Server app. Except for the fact that it isn’t there, which is obvious by the fact that it’s got a big annoying white circle over it in the Dock. Remove the Server app (and Workgroup Manager or Server Admin if they’re in there) and then it’s time to install Server itself.

Go back to the App Store and search for & buy Mountain Lion Server (or install these from Purchases if you’ve already purchased them). Once installed, Server appears in the Dock. Use the following command to verify that the IP address and hostname match:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/changeip -checkhostname

Provided that the name of the server checks out clean, click on the Server app in the Dock to be guided through the installation process.

Set Up Your Server Screen When Installing Mountain Lion Server

Set Up Your Server Screen When Installing Mountain Lion Server

At the Setup Your Server screen, click on Continue.

Agree to the Mountain Lion Server Licensing Agreement

Agree to the Mountain Lion Server Licensing Agreement

Agree to the licensing terms (assuming you do agree) by clicking on the Agree button.

Provide Administrative Credentials When Installing Mountain Lion Server

Provide Administrative Credentials When Installing Mountain Lion Server

Provide the administrative username and password to give Server and services permission upon installation and then click on the Allow button.

Configure The AppleID for Push Notifications

Configure The AppleID for Push Notifications

At the Apple Push Notifications screen, provide the Apple ID and password for a valid Apple ID and then click on the Continue button.

Congrats, You're A SysAdmin!

Congrats, You’re A SysAdmin!

After a time, you should see a Congratulations screen. Click on Finish and the Server app should automatically open (or the process fails but Server opens anyway, just without some of the stuff working out of the gate).

At this point, you should see the services that were running prior to the upgrade running. Check the logs to verify that there’s nothing out of the ordinary. If you were running a firewall then the rules will be migrated and continue running. To disable if you’re going to move your rules to pf, then use the following command to disable the rules and reboot:

sudo mv /etc/ipfilter /etc/ipfilter.OLD

You don’t need to disable these immediately, although a lack of control over them might cause you to want to… Next, install Workgroup Manager, available at http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1567. You’ve now got a functional server, provided that the entire process went smoothly. In my experience so far (there hasn’t been a ton of this at this point), the service migration is far smoother than from within the Lion Server point releases (e.g. 10.7.2 to 10.7.3, etc). Profile Manager, for example, worked like a charm on upgrade, as did Calendar and Contacts services, which had been a bit persnickety at times previously.

Now, you can get back to that book and instead of a 3rd Dr. Pepper, switch to Jägermeister!

July 28th, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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If you’re planning or preparing for an upgrade to Snow Leopard then there is likely to still be a little software not yet ready. There is a nice little compatibility matrix for software here: http://snowleopard.wikidot.com/

September 23rd, 2009

Posted In: Mac OS X

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