krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The latest version of macOS Server (5.4) is now available to be installed. To do so, first backup your server. Then, backup your server again, making sure you have a functional, bootable clone. Once you’re sure you have a solid backup of your server, open the App Store and search for Server. When you find the Server app, click on it.  

Once downloaded, you’ll be prompted that the Server app has been replaced.

Go into Applications and open the Server app. When prompted, click on Install (or Open if the server is already installed).

The download will begin. Once complete, you’ll see a notice that the “Server app replacement detected.” Click OK. Then, open the Server app. When the Server app opens, you’ll be prompted to update the server. Click Continue.  

At the Licensing Agreement screen, click Agree. At the screen to confirm your administrative access, provide a name and password for an account with administrative access and then click on Allow. Services are then upgraded. Once complete, the Server app will open and should have settings consistent with the settings prior to the upgrade. 

September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , ,

The latest version of the Apple Server app is out (macOS Server 5.4), and before you upgrade, there are a few points to review:
  • As always, make a clone of your computer before upgrading.
  • During the upgrade to High Sierra, if the operating system is running on a solid state drive, the drive will automatically upgrade to APFS. You cannot share APFS volumes over AFP, so if you’re running file services, make sure you’re aware of that. You can choose not to upgrade to APFS using the command line to upgrade a server. Even though the file sharing services are not in the Server app, you can still configure ACLs using the Storage tab under the server’s main screen.
  • The FTP Service is gone.
  • Time Machine service is gone, so if you were relying on that, rethink your backup strategy. Some options:
    • A third party backup tool.
    • A share that Time Machine on client systems can backup to.
    • Don’t upgrade.
  • Xcode Server is gone. You can still leverage third party tools to get build automations in place, but this is no longer a built-in component of macOS Server. 
  • Imaging is dead. But NetInstall still works. Because you need to run a firmware update for High Sierra (and APFS), there are caveats to imaging. You can run a NetInstall to install High Sierra onto clients (which does the firmware update). You can do a NetRestore (and Define NetRestore Sources for NetBoot) from a volume that’s already been converted to APFS to another volume that’s already been converted to APFS. But you can’t NetRestore an HFS+ volume onto an APFS volume or High Sierra on APFS onto a volume running HFS+. Long live DEP.
  • If you’re running Calendar, Contacts, and/or Mail, then you should consider moving to Google Apps or Office 365.
  • Running the Wiki service configures passwords to use a less secure way of storing passwords.
  • Alerts, Certificates, Logs, Stats, creating users, Calendar, Contacts, Mail, Messages, VPN, Websites, Wiki, DHCP, DNS, and Xsan haven’t changed in forevers, and remain pretty static in this version.
  • Open Directory and Software Update aren’t in the Services or Advanced area of the Server sidebar. You’ll access those through the View menu. The slapconfig and other binaries that comprise OD remain pretty much untouched where they are.
  • If you’re running software like anti-virus that has Kernel Extensions, those should work upon upgrade (provided they’re High Sierra compatible). If you reinstall software with Kernel Extensions, you may have to accept the installation of the Kernel Extension, due to a new and more secure way of interacting with Kernel Extensions.
  • There are new options in Profile Manager. 
Provided that you’re ok with all this, we can proceed with the upgrade!

September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Installing OS X has never been easier than it got in Yosemite, when the installers were moved to the App Store. And since then it’s just gotten easier, and easier. In this article, we’ll upgrade a Mac from OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) to macOS Sierra (10.12), the latest and greatest. The first thing you should do is clone your system (especially if you’re upgrading a server). The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. The fourth thing you should do is test that clone again… Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading “Install macOS Sierra” from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install macOS Sierra sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder. screen-shot-2016-09-25-at-4-46-14-pm Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install Sierra). screen-shot-2016-09-25-at-4-48-53-pm At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Sierra for you). screen-shot-2016-09-25-at-4-49-18-pm At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds (I’m sure it happens). screen-shot-2016-09-25-at-4-49-35-pm At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot. screen-shot-2016-09-25-at-4-49-39-pm And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff!

September 28th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , ,

Installing OS X has never been easier than in Yosemite. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.10 (Yosemite) to OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) to . The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X El Capitan from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X El Capitan sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder. Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.27.08 PM Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X El Capitan). Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.27.51 PM At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no El Capitan for you). Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.28.16 PM At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds. Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.28.35 PM At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot. Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.28.56 PM And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff! Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 11.29.43 PM

October 11th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , ,

The first Apple Watch update appeared a few days ago. This update brings with it “improved performance” for Siri, different elements of activity tracking, accessibility and third party support. 1.0.1 also brings Brazilian Portugese, Danish, Dutch, Swedish, Russian, Thai and Turkish language support. And a few minor security issues were addressed. In short, you might want to run this one… To do so, first make sure your phone is close (less than 20 feet in my opinion) and that the watch has at least half a charge. To run the upgrade, start by opening the Apple Watch app on your iPhone. From the default screen (My Watch), tap on General and then tap on Software Update. From the Software Update screen, tap on Download and Install and let the watch do it’s thing (note, you’ll be prompted for a passcode if you have one configured). The update usually takes around 15 minutes. Don’t reboot or get the phone more than 20 feet from the watch during the update. Enjoy your Brazilian Portuguese!

May 29th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

Tags: , , , , ,

Installing OS X has never been easier than in Yosemite. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) to OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.09.18 PM Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite). Install1 At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you). Install2 At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds. Install3 At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot. Install4 And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff! Install5

November 5th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , ,

Setting up OS X Server has never been easier. Neither has upgrading OS X Server. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.8 or 10.9 running Server 2 or Server 3 to OS X 10.10 (Mavericks) running Server 4. The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. The fourth thing you should do is repeat all that and triple check that your data is there! Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. I would also purchase the Server app first while Yosemite is downloading. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.15.56 PM Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.09.18 PM Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite). Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.46 PMAt the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you). Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.48 PMAt the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.52 PMAt the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot and do some installation fun stuff. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.54 PMOnce done and you’re looking at the desktop, download the latest version of the Server app you should have purchased previously, if you haven’t already. Then open it. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.05 PM If prompted that the Server app was replaced, click OK. Then open the app. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.52 PMAt the Update screen, click Continue (assuming this is the server you’re upgrading). Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.09 PMAt the Licensing screen, click Agree. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.12 PMWhen prompted for an administrator account, provide the username and password of an administrator and click OK. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.28.07 PMWhen the app opens, verify DNS (absolutely the most important element of this upgrade), etc and then check that configured services still operate as intended. If you end up deciding that you no longer need OS X Server, just delete the app and the contents of /Library/Server and you’re good. Handle with Care.

November 4th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure, Xsan

Tags: , , , , , ,

In OS X you’ve always had this weird shroud of the “Classic” environment. This type of environment was used to facilitate running things in the previous incarnation of Apple’s operating systems. Many of these have disappeared over the years. In Mavericks we see  yet another go away in a very small an almost noticeable binary, bless. While this command conjures fears of getting excommunicated by a Borgia for many, for those of us in the Apple community, the bless command is used to define a folder to mount to boot to. In 10.8 and below, there was an option to bless –folder9, used to define a OS 9/Classic system folder. Given that you can’t run those operating systems on hardware that runs 10.9 Mavericks, Apple has finally managed to rid even its most religious sounding binary of all traces of OS 9. Hallelujah! No, I’m not done yet. There’s one more thing. –bootBlockFile, –save9–saveX and –use9 are also gone now as they’re legacy (pretty much for OS 9) and no longer required.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Setting up OS X Server has never been easier. Neither has upgrading OS X Server. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.8 running Server 2 to OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) running Server 3. The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Mavericks from the App Store. I would also purchase the Server app first while Mavericks is downloading. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Mavericks sitting in LaunchPad. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.32 PM Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Mavericks). Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.46 PMAt the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you). Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.48 PMAt the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.52 PMAt the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot and do some installation fun stuff. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.54 PMOnce done, download the latest version of the Server app, if you haven’t already. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.28 PMIf prompted that the Server app was replaced, click OK. Then open the app. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.52 PMAt the Update screen, click Continue (assuming this is the server you’re upgrading). Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.54 PMAt the Licensing screen, click Agree. Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.58 PMWhen prompted for an administrator account, provide the username and password of an administrator and click OK. Screen Shot 2013-10-05 at 9.39.23 PMWhen the app opens, verify DNS, etc and then check that configured services still operate as intended. If you end up deciding that you no longer need OS X Server, just delete the app and the contents of /Library/Server and you’re good. Handle with Care.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , ,

Next Page »