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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The default, self-signed certificate that comes on a SonicWALL causes alerts during a Nessus scan. This is because the device uses a certificate that comes on the device and isn’t signed by a valid CA. Chances are, there are limits around who can load the SonicWALL web interface in the first place. But, if you don’t want Nessus to continue alerting, or if you just want to use a certificate signed by a valid CA because it’s a good security practice, you might want to add a new certificate. The first step is to generate a new CSR. To do so, open the SonicWALL web interface and then click on System in the SonicWALL sidebar. Then click on Certificates and scroll to the bottom of the screen until you see the New Signing Request button. At the resultant Certificate Signing Request screen, fill out the fields with your information. Click on the Generate button to bring up the Export Certificate screen. Click Export and then choose where to save the CSR. Once you receive the certificate, you’ll want to install it. The easiest way to do so is to go back to the Certificates screen (under System in the SonicWALL sidebar) and then scroll down to the bottom, clicking on Import… Here, use Choose File to pick the cert, provide a name for it and the password for it and click on Import. Next, click on Administration (also under System in the SonicWALL sidebar). Scroll down to the Web Management Settings section of the screen and use the Certificate Selection field to select the newly installed certificate. And that’s it. I’ve had to restart the device to get it to work properly, but overall, a pretty straight forward process.

January 7th, 2012

Posted In: Network Infrastructure

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One-to-one NAT mapping per client if you really want this to work right…

October 8th, 2007

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security, Network Infrastructure

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So I’ve been working on getting us into a bunch of new partner programs recently.  Some companies get it, others not so much.  Companies I rather like working with: Cisco, IBM, SonicWALL, CheckPoint, PGP

February 4th, 2007

Posted In: Business

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I originally posted this at http://www.318.com/TechJournal Often, a single internet connection is all that is needed to allow a group of computers to access the internet for websites, email and chatting. DSL, Cable Modem or a single T1 can often provide enough bandwidth for a small group of users. As your company grows, there can come a point where the speed of the internet connection becomes a bottleneck, increasing the time for web pages to load and for emails to be sent and received. After you hit the limits of what a single connection is able to provide, one very cost effective way to address the issue is to add a second connection. Adding a second internet connection to your network is also highly recommended if your business relies heavily on the internet. In the event of a downed internet connection, the outage could cost companies thousands of dollars in lost productivity and client interaction. By utilizing a second internet connection from an alternate provider, businesses can ensure a higher level of availability and uptime. The equipment can be set up in one of two ways. When setup in a failover configuration, the second internet connection is used only when the primary fails. In typical configurations, the fast data connection such as a T1 is supplemented by the slower connection, such as DSL, to bear the burden of connectivity in the event of an outage. When setup with load balancing, both internet connections are used simultaneously, with the traffic load being split and routed to the more ‘available’ connection. In this configuration, both data circuits should be sufficiently fast to allow the load to be effectively shared between both circuits, typically T1’s. 318 is an expert in setting up and integrating Dual-WAN networks. It can be as simple as using a DSL line and a cable modem, or as robust as using two T1s from two different providers. Or even an mix of a T1 and WiMax link. If you think this is a situation that would suit your business, give 318 a call to discuss your options.

September 5th, 2006

Posted In: Network Infrastructure

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