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The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted):

smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted

When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported. Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares:

smbutil statshares -a

You’ll then see the SHARE, ATTRIBUTE TYPE, and VALUE for each share mounted. Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb to the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow.

September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted): smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported. Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares: smbutil statshares -a Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb for the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow. Other verbs for smbutil include lookup, status, view, and identity. All are very helpful in troubleshooting connections to smb targets.

November 7th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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I wrote about using the smbutil for DFS in Lion awhile back. I haven’t needed to write anything else as it hadn’t changed since. But in OS X 10.9 Mavericks, a new option for smbutil appears: statshares. The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted): smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported. Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares: smbutil statshares -a Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb to the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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DFS stands for Distributed File Sharing. DFS is most commonly used to virtualize the way with which storage is presented to users. Once virtualized, mounts are able to replicate to one another or be moved between servers without impacting the end user experience. While many who have never used DFS will wonder why enterprises actually care about it, those of us who have used it extensively will be stoked that this new feature has been incorporated into OS X Lion. Using DFS in OS X is similar to using DFS in Windows, simply connect to a share and the work on the back end to locate where the share is actually stored is done on the server. Use Command-K (or Connect to Server from the Go menu) to bring up the Connect to Server dialog box. Enter the name of the server. You’ll be presented with a list of shares. Pick one and viola, you’re using DFS. The ease of use is why people like it. Well, that and the replication… Now, connecting to DFS is sure to be rife with problems. For troubleshooting, Apple has provided the wonderful smbutil from Valentines Day 2000 (ya’, it’s that old). smbutil comes complete with a dfs command that can be used to lookup dfs referrals. Use smbutil followed by the dfs command and then a url to check roots and links. For example, let’s say we have a box called myDFSbox.krypted.com. And let’s say that myDFSbox has a root called losangeles and a link called engineering. The command to check the referrals would be: smbutil dfs smb://myDFSbox.krypted.com/losangeles/engineering You can also inject the username and password for the domain between the protocol (smb://) and the host name (myDFSbox.krypted.com). While smbutil is helpful, I haven’t yet run into any issues where OS X didn’t enumerate the DFS environment on its own. But then, it is new and so there’s plenty of time to find issues.

July 20th, 2011

Posted In: Active Directory, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mass Deployment, Windows Server

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