Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Over the years, I’ve setup dozens of Synology Network Appliances for customers and friends. But I never thought of doing much writing in the NAS space, be it for ReadyNAS, Thecus, Buffalo, etc. The interfaces seemed to change too fast and my focus was always on the management and connectivity of Apple devices. Slowly, over the years, small business servers have gone from being something you could make a decent living to something that should probably be hosted in the cloud.

Unless you have a design requirement that just can’t work in the cloud. And for that, there are a ton of options. Today we’ll cover the basic setup of a Synology to fill one of those options. Synology has a number of models. There are those that have multiple drive bays that allow you to run a RAID 50 and there are those with just two drive bays, that allow you to run RAID 1, or 0. But most have a similar, and sleek setup process. Start by putting all the drives in the bays and then powering up your device.

When the device comes online, plug in your Ethernet cable (preferably to a gig or 10gig interface) and then open your web browser and go to You’ll see a pretty basic screen with details about the device. Click Connect.

When prompted, click Set Up.

When prompted, install the latest security updates (note: you want to do this before you start sending sensitive credentials over the wire. It’s fast. )

This is important. Those drives you put in that Synology were empty, right? ‘Cause if you proceed here, they better be. Or they will be after. If they are empty, check the box and click OK.

At the “Create your administrator account” screen enter the hostname you want to be given to your server, a username, password, password a second time to make sure, and blood type. Wait, blood type goes on the next screen, so click Next.

Sike! No blood type required. At the superfluous Congratulations screen, click next again!

At the maintenance window, select a time that the device can install updates and reboot. Also, it’s a good idea to check both of the boxes at the bottom – S.M.A.R.T. tests don’t always save you from catastrophic data loss, but it does save you way more than if you don’t use it. And bad sector warnings aren’t good either. Click Next.

A QuickConnect account allows you to access your server remotely. That’s a great thing to have. If you have one, provide it here; otherwise, give Synology an email address and password and they’ll make it simple to manage your device remotely (which includes grabbing files off it when you’re at work, etc).

Copy that link (although it’s kinda’ easy to remember as it’s<DEVICENAME>). 

I’m ok skipping the recommended packages, as I like to have more control of what’s installed on my devices, but if you’re just going to use a Synology as a basic file or Time Machine server and want as few steps as possible here, click Install. 

That’s it, click OK to be donezo. 

When you finally get into the main screen, notice that it’s kinda’ like a stripped down KDE interface. The main two things to know are Control Panel and Package Center. If you skipped installing some of the packages in the previous step, you’ll do that in Package Center. But first, let’s check out the global device settings by clicking on Control Panel.

At the Control Panel, the main things most users will want to do first are manage accounts and addresses (if you’re going to connect client computers to a file server, for example, you’re gonna’ want a static IP). So let’s click Network to configure a network interface. 

The General tab is for configuring your default gateway, upstream name servers, etc. Click Network Interface so we can enter a static address for a LAN interface. But before you do, take note that the Traffic Control tab provides the ability to do some basic traffic shaping if this box is going to run multiple services.
Let’s click on the LAN interface.

Here, you can enter the IP, subnet mask, gateway, and name server. Make sure the IP doesn’t overlap with an existing device or with a DHCP pool. I won’t go into configuring a Synology for VLAN tagging or to be a first class citizen on an 802.1x network, but note that both of those options are available here. Click OK to save your changes.

You didn’t pay good money for this thing for no reason. So next, let’s close these screens and go back to the main screen. Open Package Center. 

As you can see, there are a ton more services here than, for example, the built-in services on a macOS Server. And it’s as easy as clicking on the Install button to get started with each.

March 15th, 2018

Posted In: Network Infrastructure

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Last week, Apple finally shipped my new HomePod (and by finally, I mean exactly when they said they would). And setting it up couldn’t have been easier. Even easier than setting up my first Echos. So here’s the deal. Plug in the HomePod and then when it boots up you’ll see an overlay on an iOS device (iPhone, iPad, etc). You’ll want to use the device that has an AppleID you want to use on the HomePod (e.g. the one that your Apple Music account is using). When you see the Set Up button, tap it.

You can then select a location for the HomePod. This is important mostly if you’re going to have multiple HomePods around. Select a location and then tap Continue.

At the Personal Requests screen, tap Enable Personal Requests if you want the device to allow access to your iCloud account for things like, sending a message (note: unintended consequences include but are not limited to children deleting bad report cards, adding weird items to the grocery list, and sending messages from one parent to the other).

At the Terms and Conditions screen, tap Agree if you agree to the terms; otherwise put the device back in the box and return it.

At the Accounts and Settings screen, you can transfer settings to the HomePad, which gives the HomePod access to the wi-fi password for your network (so your phone doesn’t have to be close to the HomePod for it to work).

Next, you need to ask Siri a question.

I recommend asking “Siri, how are you today?”

Once configured, you can go to Settings and AppleID to see the HomePod.

From there, you can see the model, version, serial, and if you happened to configure the HomePod to work with the wrong AppleID, you can tap Remove from Account to be able to configure the device with a different account.

And finally, open the Home device and you’ll see your device. 

From there, tap on the device and you’ll have a few more settings for how the HomePod works with the Home app. Here, you can change the room, change the AppleID, choose to include in the Favorites of your home screen, and disable access to Explicit Content. 

Scroll down and you can choose to share HomePod Analytics. Notice that this is opt-in and they’re clear about how they’ll use it if you enable it. 

So the setup is simple. I’ll have another article for configuring some home automations, so you can control them with the HomePod.

February 12th, 2018

Posted In: Home Automation, iPhone

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Getting started with Messages Server couldn’t really be easier. Messages Server in the macOS Server 5.2 version of the Server app uses the open source jabber project as their back-end code base. The jabber binary is located at /Applications/ directory and the autobuddy binary is at /Applications/ The actual jabberd binary is also stored at /Applications/, where there are a couple of perl scripts used to migrate the service between various versions as well. Setting up the Messages service is simple. Open the Server app and click on Messages in the Server app sidebar.  screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-11-03-18-am Click on the Edit… button for the Permissions. Here, define which users and interfaces are allowed to use the service. screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-11-03-45-am From Server app, click on the checkbox for “Enable server-to-server federation” if you have multiple iChat, er, I mean, Messages servers and provide the address for servers to federate to. screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-11-04-14-am Next, click on the checkbox for “Archive all chat messages” if you’d like transcripts of all Messages sessions that route through the server to be saved on the server. screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-11-04-47-am You should use an SSL certificate with the Messages service. If enabling federation so you can have multiple Messages servers, you have to. Before enabling the service, click on the name of the server in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Settings tab. From here, click on Edit for the SSL Certificate (which should be plural btw) entry to bring up a screen to select SSL Certificates. At the SSL Certificates screen (here it’s plural!), select the certificate the Messages service should use from the available list supplied beside that entry and click on the OK button. If you need to setup federation, click back on the Messages service in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Edit button. Then, click on the checkbox for Require server-to-server federation (making sure each server has the other’s SSL certificate installed) and then choose whether to allow any server to federate with yours or to restrict which servers are allowed. I have always restricted unless I was specifically setting up a server I wanted to be public (like public as in everyone in the world can federate to it, including the gorram reavers that want to wear your skin). screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-11-05-38-am To restrict the service, then provide a list of each server address capable of communicating with your server. Once all the servers are entered, click the OK button. Obviously, if you only have one server, you can skip that. Once the settings are as you wish them to be, click on the ON/OFF switch to light up the service. To see the status of the service, once started, use the fullstatus option with serveradmin followed by the jabber indicator: sudo serveradmin fullstatus jabber The output includes whether the service is running, the location of jabber log files, the name of the server as well as the time the service was started, as can be seen here: jabber:state = "RUNNING"
jabber:roomsState = "RUNNING"
jabber:logPaths:PROXY_LOG = "/private/var/jabberd/log/proxy65.log"
jabber:logPaths:MUC_STD_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:logPaths:JABBER_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:proxyState = "RUNNING"
jabber:currentConnections = "0"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort1 = "0"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort2 = "0"
jabber:pluginVersion = "10.8.211"
jabber:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
jabber:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "osxserver.krypted.lan"
jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "osxserver.krypted.lan"
jabber:setStateVersion = 1
jabber:startedTime = ""
jabber:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1 There are also a few settings not available in the Server app. One of these that can be important is the port used to communicate between the Messages client and the Messages service on the server. For example, to customize this to 8080, use serveradmin followed by settings and then jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080, as follows: sudo serveradmin settings jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080 To change the location of the saved Messages transcripts (here, we’ll set it to /Volumes/Pegasus/Book: sudo serveradmin settings jabber:savedChatsLocation = “/Volumes/Pegasus/Book” To see a full listing of the options, just run settings with the jabber service: sudo serveradmin settings jabber The output lists each setting configurable:
jabber:dataLocation = “/Library/Server/Messages” jabber:s2sRestrictDomains = no jabber:jabberdDatabasePath = “/Library/Server/Messages/Data/sqlite/jabberd2.db” jabber:sslCAFile = “/etc/certificates/” jabber:jabberdClientPortTLS = 5222 jabber:sslKeyFile = “/etc/certificates/” jabber:initialized = yes jabber:enableXMPP = yes jabber:savedChatsArchiveInterval = 7 jabber:authLevel = “STANDARD” jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = “” jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 5223 jabber:requireSecureS2S = yes jabber:savedChatsLocation = “/Library/Server/Messages/Data/message_archives” jabber:enableSavedChats = yes jabber:enableAutoBuddy = no jabber:s2sAllowedDomains = _empty_array jabber:logLevel = “ALL” jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = “” jabber:eventLogArchiveInterval = 7 jabber:jabberdS2SPort = 5269
To stop the service: sudo serveradmin stop jabber And to start it back up: sudo serveradmin start jabber It’s also worth noting something that’s completely missing in this whole thing: Apple Push Notifications… Why is that important? Well, you use the Messages application to communicate not only with Mac OS X and other jabber clients, but you can also use Messages to send text messages. Given that there’s nothing in the server that has anything to do with texts, push or anything of the sort, it’s worth noting that these messages don’t route through the server and therefore still require an iCloud account. Not a huge deal, but worth mentioning that Messages server doesn’t have the same updates built into the Messages app. Because messages don’t traverse the server, there’s no transcripts.

October 12th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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Sometimes you need to write a record into a table in a SQL database. The INSERT INTO statement creates new records in a table and can work in one of two ways. The first form does not specify the column names where the data will be inserted, only their values. When doing so, each value needs to be inserted in the columned order they appear, here the table being the name of the table you’re adding a record into and each value would be replaced with the contents of your value (don’t insert the string ‘value’ into each!): INSERT INTO table VALUES (value,value,value,...); If you don’t have every value to insert, you can also list the columns to insert data in and then include the values in the same order that the columns are listed in. The second form specifies both the column names and the values to insert: INSERT INTO table (column,column,column,...) VALUES (value,value,value,...); Below is a selection from the “Customers” table that I put in the first article. We will use it to run some SQL statements using the INSERT keyword so that we can add data to our little database: ID Site Contact Address City Zip Country 1 Krypted Charles Edge my house Minneapolis 55418 US 2 Apple Tim Cook spaceship Cupertino 95014 US 3 Microsoft Satya Nadella campus Redmond 98053 US 4 Facebook Mark Zuckerberg foodhall Menlo Park 94025 US 5 JAMF Dean Hager Grain Exchange Minneapolis 55418 US To insert a new row in the “Customers” table, we’ll add a row for Huffington Post with Arianna Huffington as the owner, her address as “The Library, with a city of Los Angeles, a zip of 90077, and a country of the US. INSERT INTO Customers (Site, Contact, Address, City, Zip, Country) VALUES ('Huffington Post','Arianna Huffington','The Library','Los Angeles','90077','US'); The selection from the “Customers” table will now look like this, after the ID record incremented on its own, taking the next available integer: ID Site Contact Address City Zip Country 1 Krypted Charles Edge my house Minneapolis 55418 US 2 Apple Tim Cook spaceship Cupertino 95014 US 3 Microsoft Satya Nadella campus Redmond 98053 US 4 Facebook Mark Zuckerberg foodhall Menlo Park 94025 US 5 JAMF Dean Hager Grain Exchange Minneapolis 55418 US 6 Huffington Post Arianna Huffington The Library Los Angeles 90077 US As mentioned, you can also Insert Data Only in Specified Columns It is also possible to only insert data in specific columns. The following SQL statement will insert a new row, but only insert data in the Site, Contact, and Country columns: INSERT INTO Customers (Site, Contact, Country) VALUES ('Spotify', 'Daniel Elk', 'SE'); The selection from the “Customers” table will now look like this: ID Site Contact Address City Zip Country 1 Krypted Charles Edge my house Minneapolis 55418 US 2 Apple Tim Cook spaceship Cupertino 95014 US 3 Microsoft Satya Nadella campus Redmond 98053 US 4 Facebook Mark Zuckerberg foodhall Menlo Park 94025 US 5 JAMF Dean Hager Grain Exchange Minneapolis 55418 US 6 Huffington Post Arianna Huffington The Library Los Angeles 90077 US 7 Spotify Daniel Elk SE Overall, adding rows to SQL tables is really straight forward. I mean, you’re not replacing anything… Yet…

February 3rd, 2016

Posted In: SQL

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Apple Configurator 2 is a great new evolution in iOS initial and configuration management. And there are lots of great options. And to help you wrap your head around all this new fun stuff, I’ve written up a quick and dirty guide for using Apple Configurator 2. Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 10.02.03 PM It’s not completely done, but it will be shortly. Hope this help someone. Enjoy!

November 14th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Configurator, iPhone, Mass Deployment

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The new fourth generation Apple TV is everything I hoped the third generation would be. We have a touch remote with a Mic, great video, USB-C, and most importantly, an App Store! And while I have security concerns around the setup process, I am sure Apple has thought through the myriad of questions I have surrounding sharing Apple ID keys over bluetooth from a phone to the Apple TV to streamline the setup process. So about that setup process. Configuring the new Apple TV is pretty straight forward. To get started, get your phone out. Yes, your phone. Then unwrap the Apple TV and plug it into the HDMI port on your TV and the AC adapter (which is the same as the second and third generation Apple TVs). IMG_6014 Once plugged in, boot up your Apple TV. When prompted, click Set Up with Device on the fancy  new remote. IMG_6015 At the Set Up Your Apple TV prompt, make sure that Bluetooth is enabled on your phone and then wait for it, the TV will see your phone! Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 8.03.45 PM When prompted on your phone, tap Continue. IMG_6017 When the TV tells you to enter the Apple ID on your phone, make sure your phone is unlocked and then provide that information. IMG_6018 You’re then prompted for whether you’d like the Apple TV to retain your password. Obviously, if you have kids that love to buy in app purchases, this might be a bad idea. If you live alone, maybe a good idea. IMG_6019 Make your selection and then you’ll be prompted for whether you’d like to send data to Apple. I usually tap OK here, as I prefer my experience to get better with products (and usually don’t go in for all the tin foil hat stuffs). IMG_6020 Back on the TV, choose whether or not to enable Location Services. If you travel with Apple TV, this might be helpful. If not, then it’s likely not a biggee. IMG_6021 One of the great new features is the new Siri integration with Apple TV. While Siri on my TV doesn’t seem to like me much, I’m sure it’s my fault, so I’d still click that Use Siri option. IMG_6022 I loved the photos on the previous generation of Apple TV, so decided to let Apple give me some more. You may not want to use their background for a screensaver. Click Automatically Download if you’d like to use theirs, or Not Now if not. IMG_6023 You’re then prompted for whether or not to send Diagnostics and Usage Data to Apple again. Choose if you’d like to do so. IMG_6024 If you want your apps to get better, click Share with App Developers. IMG_6025 Click Agree to agree to the warranty. IMG_6026 Click Agree to agree to Apple’s Terms and Conditions (for these, you can’t proceed unless you agree to them; otherwise you can return the device). IMG_6027 Now you’re at the Main Apple TV screen. If you’re used to using Netflix, the next thing you’ll want to do is head over to the App Store and install some apps. You can also go ahead and start buying media, etc. Enjoy!  

November 3rd, 2015

Posted In: Apple TV

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I’ve written a couple of articles about the Caching service in OS X Server 5 for El Capitan. As of OS X Server 5, the Caching service now caches local copies on the computer running the Caching service of iCloud content. This allows you to cache content once and then have it accessed by multiple devices faster. I’m torn on this option. On the one hand, I love the fact that I can cache things and on the other hand I find it frightening that a random user can cache things I might not want them to cache on behalf of another user. I know, I know, they’re encrypted with a device key. But when you have data on disk, it can always be decrypted. I almost feel like there should be a plist on machines that whitelists allowed caching servers. Maybe I should make a feature request on that. Either way, as it stands now, I might be disabling this option in larger offices. To do so, I can write an AllowPersonalCaching key into the Config.plist file at /Library/Server/Caching/Config/. The most graceful way to do this is using the serveradmin command, followed by the settings verb and then caching:AllowPersonalCaching option, setting that equals no, as follows: sudo serveradmin settings caching:AllowPersonalCaching = no To turn it back on: sudo serveradmin settings caching:AllowPersonalCaching = yes This can also be done by dropping a Config.plist file into the correct location for new server installations. I’ll have an article out shortly on doing so, as you’d want to normalize a few options in the file before deploying en masse (e.g. if you have a large contingent of Caching servers to manage.

October 16th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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The first thing you’ll want to do on any server is setup the networking for the computer. To do this, open the System Preferences and click on Network. You usually want to use a wired Ethernet connection on a server, but in this case we’ll be using Wi-Fi. Here, click on the Wi-Fi interface and then click on the Advanced… button.

At the setup screen for the interface, provide a good static IP address. Your network administrator can provide this fairly easily. Here, make sure you have an IP address and a subnet mask. Since we need to install the Server app from the Mac App Store, and that’s on the Internet, you’ll also need to include a gateway, which provides access to the Internet and using the DNS tab, the name servers for your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
Once you have provided a static IP address, verify that you can route to the Internet (e.g. open Safari and visit a website). Provided you can, the first step to installing macOS Server onto High Sierra is to download the Server app from the Mac App Store. To do so, open the App Store app and search for Server. In the available apps, you’ll see the Server app from Apple. Here, click on Buy and let the app download. That was pretty easy, right. Well, the fun has just gotten started. Next, open the app. When you first open the Server app, you’ll see the Server screen. Here, you can click on the following options:
  • Other Mac: Shows a list of Macs with the Server app that can be remotely configured. Choosing another system does not complete the setup process on the system you’re working on at the moment.
  • Cancel: Stops the Server app setup assistant and closes the Server App.
  • Continue: Continues installing the Server app on the computer you are using.
  • Help: Brings up the macOS Server manual.

Click Continue to setup macOS Server on the machine you’re currently using. You’ll then be prompted for the licensing agreement from Apple. Here, check the box to “Use Apple services to determine this server’s Internet reachability” and click on Agree (assuming of course that you agree to Apple’s terms in the license agreement).

Installing macOS Server must be done with elevated privileges. At the prompt, enter the credentials for an account with administrative access and click on the Allow button.

The services are then configured as needed and the command line tools are made accessible. This can take some time, so be patient. When the app is finished with the automation portion of the configuration, you will be placed into the Server app for the first time. Your first order of business is to make sure that the host names are good on the computer. Here, first check the Host Name. If the name doesn’t resolve properly (forward and reverse) then you will likely have problems with the server at some point. Therefore, go ahead and click on Edit Host Name… Here, enter the fully qualified address that the server should have. In the DNS article, we’ll look at configuring a good DNS server, but for now, keep in mind that you’ll want your DNS record that points to the server to match what you enter here. And users will use this address to access your server, so use something that is easy to communicate verbally, when needed.

At the Change Host Name screen, click Next. At the “Accessing your Server” screen, click on Internet and then click on the Next button.

At the “Connecting to your Server” screen, provide the Computer Name and the Host Name. The Computer Name is what you will see when you connect to the server over Bonjour and what will be listed in the Sharing System Preference pane. The Host Name is the fully qualified host name (fqdn) of the computer. I usually like to take the computer name and put it in front of the domain name. For example, in the following screen, I have osxserver as the name of the computer and as the host name.

Once you have entered the names, click on the Finish button. You are then prompted to Change Host Name. Click on Change Host Name at this screen. Next, let’s open Terminal and run changeip with the -checkhostname option, to verify that the IP and hostname match:
sudo changeip -checkhostname
Provided that the IP address and hostname match, you’ll see the following response. sudirserv:success = “success” If the IP address and hostname do not match, then you might want to consider enabling the DNS server and configuring a record for the server. But at this point, you’ve finished setting up the initial server and are ready to start configuring whatever options you will need on the server.

October 4th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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You waited. And you tapped your fingers on the desk. And you sat and waited some more, for the UPS person. You stared at your mailbox. And then, after all of that, UPS showed up. And you signed. And then you had that box in your hands. The cardboard box, when opened, gave way to a sweet white box. You opened it by pulling the little tag off, and then you pulled the watch out of the box. You tried on the two bands. And you picked the one that fit you the best. So now what? Turn on the watch by hitting the button on the side and watch that beautiful Apple logo light up the screen. But now you need to pair the watch with your phone for it to be useable. So what to do? Well, first of all, make sure your phone is updated to the latest and greatest version of iOS. From there, open the Apple Watch app on the iPhone. IMG_3471 The app will prompt you to start pairing a watch with the phone. You can only pair one watch with an iPhone. Tap the Start Pairing button. When prompted, line up the screen on the watch with the image and the outline. IMG_3472 Wait for the watch to complete pairing and then tap the Set Up Apple Watch button. IMG_3473 You’ll then be prompted for which wrist to put the watch on. I used my dominant wrist, so right. IMG_3474 You’ll then be prompted to accept the Terms and Conditions (aka license agreement) from Apple. Tap Agree. IMG_3475 Tap Agree again. IMG_3476 Next, when prompted for the Apple ID to use, if you’d like to use an Apple ID with the watch, provide the password for that Apple ID using the Enter Password button, or use the Skip This Step option to skip the Apple ID. IMG_3477 At the Location Services screen, tap OK. This is really just informational to let you know that Location Services will be used. It’s kinda’ necessary to use the watch properly. IMG_3478 At the Siri screen, again, you’re informed that Siri will be used. Tap OK. IMG_3479 At the Diagnostics screen, same thing. You’re informed that diagnostics will be supplied to Apple. Tap OK. IMG_3480 At the Apple Watch Passcode screen, choose whether you’d like to use a passcode on the watch. I’m not a fan of using a passcode on the watch; however, you will have to use one if you want to use Apple Pay on the watch. Tap Create a Passcode to set one up now and then provide the passcode you’d like to use. IMG_3481 The Apple Watch will sync apps and show glances from apps that are on the phone. Tap Install All to go ahead and install any Apple Watch apps on the device. You can always turn them off later. Or you can tap Choose Later to go ahead and complete setup and wait until later to set up the watch and finish apps setup later. I’d recommend using Install All and then turn off the ones you don’t want later. IMG_3482 Then the watch will start syncing with your devices. At the Apple Watch Is Syncing screen, wait. Don’t do anything else or get the watch too far from the phone or you’ll have to start over from scratch. IMG_3483 The watch looks like this while it’s syncing. IMG_3484 Once the watch is finished syncing, use the My Watch app to sync apps, show glances, setup Apple Pay and configure which built-in apps are shown on the device. IMG_3508 The next and most important aspect of your new Apple Watch is to use it and love it. Go for a run, sync some apps, enjoy the hell out of your new watch. It’s great. Now, get to it!

May 9th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

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Bushel allows you to deploy settings for Wi-Fi networks to all of your users enrolled in Bushel. Bushel supports WEP, WPA, and WPA2. For More On Adding Wi-Fi configurations with Bushel, Click Here

April 6th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel

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