Tag Archives: Servers

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

MacVoices Podcast With Chuck Joiner About The New Take Control Of OS X Server Book!

Yay, podcasts! Chuck Joiner was kind enough to have me on MacVoices. We did a show, now available at http://www.macvoices.com/macvoices-14223-charles-edge-helps-take-control-os-x-server

Or if you’d like to watch on YouTube or inline:

http://youtu.be/AeccoRqIrgc

Active Directory Windows Server

Use Windows Backup To Back Up Windows Server 2012

WIndows Server’s ntbackup tools have become easier and easier to use over time. But there’s no more ntbackup. Well, there’s wbadmin, which is very similar. You can still restore data by downloading ntbackups restore tool at http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=974674. 

Windows Backup is now capable of backing up a system with the same ease of use that Apple brought to automated backups with Time Machine and Time Machine Server. In fact, providing access to only a few more options Microsoft’s tools provide access to some pretty nice options, easily configured.

To get started, you’ll first need to install the Windows Backup Role. To do so, use the Add Roles and Features Wizard in Windows Server 2012 to add the Windows Backup role. Once added, open Server Manager and then click on the Tools menu, selecting Windows Server Backup.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.02.23 PM

From Windows Server backup, you can enter the name of an Azure account to configure cloud based backups. However, in this walkthrough we’re going to choose local backups, which really for us means to a network share rather than the cloud, although we could back up to a USB drive or some other internal drive as well. Click Local Backup, then click Configure. Click on Backup Schedule… to bring up the Backup Schedule Wizard. At the Getting Started screen, click on the Next button.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.02.56 PM

At the Server Backup Configuration screen of the Backup Schedule Wizard, choose whether to back up all the data or perform a custom backup, which allows you to define only certain files to back up. I like to back up all the data for the most part, so we’re going to go with the full server and click Next.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.03.11 PM

At the Specify Backup Time screen, choose the appropriate times of the day to back the server up and click on the Next button.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.03.52 PM

At the Specify Destination Type screen, choose where you’d like to back your data up to and then click on the Next button. As mentioned, we’re going to back data up to a network share.

Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.04.07 PM

At the Specify Remote Shared Folder screen, provide a path to the network path that you’d like to back your files up to.

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The backups should then be tested and validated before putting a system into long-term production. The command line tool used to manage backups is wbadmin. The wbadmin has the following verbs available to it:

  • enable backup – modifies existing backups or makes new schedules
  • disable backup – disables a backup schedule
  • start backup – starts a one-time backup job
  • stop job – stops running recovery or backup jobs that are currently in progress
  • get versions – shows the details of backups for recovery
  • get items – lists the contents of a backup
  • start recovery – runs a recovery job
  • get disks – shows online disks
  • get virtualmachines – shows Hyper-V VMs
  • start systemstaterecovery – recovers the system state backup from a valid system state backup
  • start systemstatebackup – makes a system state backup
  • delete systemstatebackup – deletes a system state backup
  • delete backup – deletes a backup
  • delete catalog – used if a catalog gets corrupt usually, to delete a catalog of backups
  • restore catalog – only use this option to attempt to fix corrupted catalogs, restores a catalog

Note: In addition to these options, there are even more commands available to Powershell. These are pretty well documented at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee706683.aspx.

So while you will still need a 3rd party tool if you wish to backup to tape or you need very complex features, there’s now a very easy to use tool, that integrates cloud and local storage backups for Windows Server and is just about as easy to manage and configure as Apple’s Time Machine is on OS X or OS X Server.

certifications Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Apple Pro Training Series for ACTC

Arek Dreyer and Ben Greisler have been at it again. The latest editions of the Apple Training Series books are now out, providing a guide to getting certified with OS X Server. I haven’t gotten mine yet, but I suspect that the book, as with the previous books, will be excellent.

To quote the book description:

The only Apple-certified book on OS X Server on Mountain Lion, this comprehensive reference takes support technicians and ardent Mac users deep inside the server for the latest operating system, covering everything from networking technologies to service administration, customizing users and groups, and more. Aligned to the learning objectives of the Apple Certified Technical Coordinator certification exam, the lessons in this self-paced volume serves as a perfect supplement to Apple’s own training class and a first-rate primer for computer support personnel who need to support and maintain OS X Server on Mountain Lion as part of their jobs. Step-by-step exercises reinforce the concepts taught through practical application. Quizzes summarize and reinforce acquired knowledge. The Newest version of OS X is more business-friendly than ever, making it simple to get a network up and running quickly, and IT professionals will need Server Essentials to integrate Macs into their organizations.

The Apple Pro Training Series serves as both a self-paced learning tool and the official curriculum for the OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Server on Mountain Lion certification programs.

The Apple Support Essentials book is out as well (thanks, Mr. White!). Its description is as follows:

The only Apple-certified book on OS X Mountain Lion, this revised best-seller will take you deep inside the latest big-cat operating system–covering everything from installation and configuration, customizing the operating system, supporting applications, setting up peripherals, and more. Whether you’re a support technician or simply an ardent Mac user, you’ll quickly learn and master the new features in OS X Mountain Lion. Following the learning objectives of the Apple Certified Support Professional exam, this self-paced book is a perfect guide for Apple’s training and a first-rate primer for computer support personnel who need to troubleshoot and optimize OS X Mountain Lion as part of their jobs. Step-by-step exercises reinforce the concepts taught through practical application. Chapter review sections and quizzes summarize and reinforce acquired knowledge.

The Apple Pro Training Series serves as both a self-paced learning tool and the official curriculum for OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Mountain Lion Server certification programs.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Updating Firmware on Servers

I’m often asked what I think of upgrading the firmware on servers and storage.  My answer there, if it’s a production box and it isn’t broken then don’t fix it…  What if you’re upgrading the firmware on a RAID or RAID card and the device becomes unresponsive?  There’s usually a reason to upgrade, but if you are not experiencing problems then why risk a potential outage if you do not need to?

Mac OS X Server

Updating Firmware on Servers