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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The first thing you’ll want to do on any server is setup the networking for the computer. To do this, open the System Preferences and click on Network. You usually want to use a wired Ethernet connection on a server, but in this case we’ll be using Wi-Fi. Here, click on the Wi-Fi interface and then click on the Advanced… button.

At the setup screen for the interface, provide a good static IP address. Your network administrator can provide this fairly easily. Here, make sure you have an IP address and a subnet mask. Since we need to install the Server app from the Mac App Store, and that’s on the Internet, you’ll also need to include a gateway, which provides access to the Internet and using the DNS tab, the name servers for your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
 
Once you have provided a static IP address, verify that you can route to the Internet (e.g. open Safari and visit a website). Provided you can, the first step to installing macOS Server onto High Sierra is to download the Server app from the Mac App Store. To do so, open the App Store app and search for Server. In the available apps, you’ll see the Server app from Apple. Here, click on Buy and let the app download. That was pretty easy, right. Well, the fun has just gotten started. Next, open the app.

When you first open the Server app, you’ll see the Server screen. Here, you can click on the following options:
  • Other Mac: Shows a list of Macs with the Server app that can be remotely configured. Choosing another system does not complete the setup process on the system you’re working on at the moment.
  • Cancel: Stops the Server app setup assistant and closes the Server App.
  • Continue: Continues installing the Server app on the computer you are using.
  • Help: Brings up the macOS Server manual.
 

Click Continue to setup macOS Server on the machine you’re currently using. You’ll then be prompted for the licensing agreement from Apple. Here, check the box to “Use Apple services to determine this server’s Internet reachability” and click on Agree (assuming of course that you agree to Apple’s terms in the license agreement).

Installing macOS Server must be done with elevated privileges. At the prompt, enter the credentials for an account with administrative access and click on the Allow button.

The services are then configured as needed and the command line tools are made accessible. This can take some time, so be patient. When the app is finished with the automation portion of the configuration, you will be placed into the Server app for the first time. Your first order of business is to make sure that the host names are good on the computer. Here, first check the Host Name. If the name doesn’t resolve properly (forward and reverse) then you will likely have problems with the server at some point. Therefore, go ahead and click on Edit Host Name… Here, enter the fully qualified address that the server should have. In the DNS article, we’ll look at configuring a good DNS server, but for now, keep in mind that you’ll want your DNS record that points to the server to match what you enter here. And users will use this address to access your server, so use something that is easy to communicate verbally, when needed.

 
At the Change Host Name screen, click Next. At the “Accessing your Server” screen, click on Internet and then click on the Next button.



At the “Connecting to your Server” screen, provide the Computer Name and the Host Name. The Computer Name is what you will see when you connect to the server over Bonjour and what will be listed in the Sharing System Preference pane. The Host Name is the fully qualified host name (fqdn) of the computer. I usually like to take the computer name and put it in front of the domain name. For example, in the following screen, I have osxserver as the name of the computer and osxserver.krypted.com as the host name.



Once you have entered the names, click on the Finish button. You are then prompted to Change Host Name. Click on Change Host Name at this screen.

Next, let’s open Terminal and run changeip with the -checkhostname option, to verify that the IP and hostname match:

sudo changeip -checkhostname


Provided that the IP address and hostname match, you’ll see the following response.

sudirserv:success = “success”

If the IP address and hostname do not match, then you might want to consider enabling the DNS server and configuring a record for the server. But at this point, you’ve finished setting up the initial server and are ready to start configuring whatever options you will need on the server.

September 28th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Every Mac by default has an application called Contacts. Every macOS Server 5.4, running on High Sierra, has a service called Contacts. While the names might imply very different things that they do, you’ll be super-surprised that the two are designed to work with one another. The Contacts service is based on CardDAV, a protocol for storing contact information on the web, retrievable and digestible by client computers. However, there is a layer of database-driven obfuscation between the Contacts service and CardDAV. The Contacts service is also a conduit with which to read information from LDAP and display that information in the Contacts client, which is in a way similar to how the Global Address List (GAL) works in Microsoft Exchange.

I know I’ve said this about other services in macOS Server, but the Contacts service couldn’t be easier to configure. First, you should be running Open Directory and you should also have configured Apple Push Notifications. To setup Push Notifications, have an Apple ID handy and click on the Contacts entry in the SERVICES section of Server app.

Click the Edit Notifications button to configure the Apple Push Notification settings for the computer. When prompted, click on Enable Notifications.

If prompted, provide the username and password for the Apple ID and then click on Finish. To enable the Contacts service, open the Server app and then click on Contacts in the SERVICES section of the List Pane. From here, use the “Include directory contacts in search” checkbox to publish LDAP contacts through the service, or leave this option unchecked and click on the ON button to enable the service.

The Contacts service then starts and once complete, a green light appears beside the Contacts entry in the List Pane. To configure a client open the Contacts application on a client computer and use the Preferences entry in the Contacts menu to bring up the Preferences screen. From here, click the Accounts menu and then click on Add Accounts.

At the Add Account screen, scroll down and click Add Other Account… to bring up an expanded menu of account types. Click “CardDAV account”.

At the “Add a Contacts Account” screen, enter the email address and password of the user. Auto discovery doesn’t always work, so you might end up using the manual button to add the account using the server’s address. Alternatively, if you’ve mapped CardDAV to custom ports, you may use the advanced option to have paths and ports available.

When the account is finished creating, you can click on the account again to see the settings used. Otherwise, close the Preferences/Accounts screen and then view the list of Contacts. Click on View and then Show Groups. This will show you the name of the servers that you’re connected to in the sidebar. There won’t be any contacts yet, so click on the plus sign to verify you have write access to the server.
 
Next, let’s get access to the LDAP-based contacts. To do so, bring up the Add Account screen again and this time select LDAP Account from the Account Type field.

Provide the name or IP address of the server and then the port that LDAP contacts are available over (the defaults, 389 and 636 with SSL are more than likely the settings that you’ll use. Then click on the Continue button.

At the Account Settings screen, provide the name that will appear in the Contacts app for the account in the Description field and then enter the search base in the Search base field. To determine the search base, use the serveradmin command. The following command will output the search base:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings dirserv:LDAPSettings:LDAPSearchBase

Then set Authentication to simple and provide the username and password to access the server for the account you are configuring. The list then appears.

The default port for the Contacts service is 8443, as seen earlier in the configuration of the client. To customize the port, use the serveradmin command to set addressbook settings for BindSSLPorts to edit the initial array entry, as follows:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings addressbook:SSLPort = 8443

The default location for the files used by the Contacts service is in the /Library/Server/Calendar and Contacts directory. To change that to a folder called /Volumes/Pegasys/CardDAV, use the following command:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings addressbook:ServerRoot = "/Volumes/Pegasys/CardDAV"

When changing the ServerRoot, you’ll likely need to change the DataRoot, which is usually the Data directory immediately underneath the ServerRoot. To do so, run serveradmin and put the DataRoot entry under the addressbook settings:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings addressbook:DataRoot = "/Volumes/Pegasys/CardDAV/Data"

The service is then stopped with the serveradmin command:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin stop addressbook

And started with the serveradmin command:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin start addressbook

And whether the service is running, along with the paths to the logs can be obtained using the fullstatus command with serveradmin:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin fullstatus addressbook

The output of which should be as follows:

status addressbook
addressbook:state = “RUNNING”
addressbook:setStateVersion = 1
addressbook:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1

If you’re easily amused, run the serveradmin settings for calendar and compare them to the serveradmin settings for addressbook:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings calendar

By default, the Contacts server allows basic authentication. We’ll just turn that off real quick:

sudo /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings addressbook:Authentication:Basic:Enabled = no

And then let’s see what it is in addressbook:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/sbin/serveradmin settings addressbook:Authentication:Basic:Enabled

September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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The Time Machine service in macOS Server 5.2 hasn’t changed much from the service in previous operating systems. To enable the Time Machine service, open the Server app, click on Time Machine in the SERVICES sidebar. If the service hasn’t been enabled to date, the ON/OFF switch will be in the OFF position and no “Backup destination” will be shown in the Settings pane. screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-8-56-29-pm Click on the ON button to see the New Destination screen, used to configure a list of volumes as a destinations for Time Machine backups. The selection volume should be large enough to have space for all of the users that can potentially use the Time Machine service hosted on the server. When you click the Choose button, a list of volumes appears in a standard Finder selection screen. screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-8-57-19-pm Here, click on the volume to save your backups to in the sidebar. In most cases the Backup destination will be a mass storage device and not the boot volume of the computer. Once selected, click Choose and then if desired, limit the amount of storage on the volume to be used for backups. Click Create and a share called Backups is created and the service will start. Don’t touch anything until the service starts. Once started, add a backup destination at any time using the plus sign button (“+”) and defining another destination. screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-8-57-40-pm Time Machine Server works via Bonjour. Open the Time Machine System Preference pane and then click on the Select Backup Disk button from a client to see the server in the list of available targets, much as you would do with an Apple Time Capsule. screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-8-58-33-pm Under the hood, a backup share is creating in the file sharing service. To see the attributes of this share, use the serveradmin command followed by the settings option and then the sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:, so for a path of /Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups use: sudo serveradmin settings sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups The output indicates the options configured for the share, including how locking is handled, guest access disabled, generated identifiers and the protocols the backups share listens as:
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:name = "Backups"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbName = "Backups"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:nfsExportRecord = _empty_array
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpIsGuestAccessEnabled = no
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:isTimeMachineBackup = yes
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:dsAttrTypeNative\:sharepoint_group_id = "F4610C2C-70CD-47CF-A75B-3BAFB26D9EF3"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:isIndexingEnabled = yes
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:mountedOnPath = "/Volumes/New Volume 1"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:dsAttrTypeStandard\:GeneratedUID = "FAB13586-2A2A-4DB2-97C7-FDD2D747A0CD"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:path = "/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbIsShared = no
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbIsGuestAccessEnabled = no
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpName = "Backups"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbDirectoryMask = "755"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpIsShared = yes
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbCreateMask = "644"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:ftpName = "Backups"
sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:timeMachineBackupUUID = "844A1C43-61C9-4F99-91DE-C105EA95BD45"
Once the service is running, administrators frequently fill up the target volume. To move data to another location, first stop the service and then move the folder (e.g. using mv). Once moved, use the serveradmin command to send settings to the new backup path. For example, to change the target to /Volumes/bighonkindisk, use the following command: sudo serveradmin settings sharing:sharePointList:_array_id:/Shared Items/Backups:path = "/Volumes/bighonkindisk" Another way to see the share and attributes of the share is through the sharing command: sharing -l Which should show output similar to the following: List of Share Points
name: Backups
path: /Shared Items/Backups
afp: {
name: Backups
shared: 1
guest access: 0
inherit perms: 0
}
ftp: {
name: Backups
shared: 0
guest access: 0
}
smb: {
name: Backups
shared: 0
guest access: 0
} There’s also a Bonjour service published that announces to other clients on the same subnet that the server can be used as a backup destination (the same technology used in a Time Capsule). One major update from back in Mavericks Server is the addition of the timemachine service in the severadmin command line interface. To see the command line settings for Time Machine: sudo serveradmin settings timemachine The output shows that share info is displayed as with the sharing service, but you can also see the GUID assigned to each share that is a part of the backup pool of storage:
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:dsAttrTypeStandard\:GeneratedUID = "FAB13586-2A2A-4DB2-97C7-FDD2D747A0CD"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbName = "Backups"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpIsGuestAccessEnabled = no
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbDirectoryMask = "755"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpName = "Backups"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbCreateMask = "644"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:nfsExportRecord = _empty_array
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:path = "/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbIsGuestAccessEnabled = no
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:name = "Backups"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:ftpName = "Backups"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:smbIsShared = no
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:afpIsShared = yes
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:timeMachineBackupUUID = "844A1C43-61C9-4F99-91DE-C105EA95BD45"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:isTimeMachineBackup = yes
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:backupQuota = 0
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:dsAttrTypeNative\:sharepoint_group_id = "F4610C2C-70CD-47CF-A75B-3BAFB26D9EF3"
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:isIndexingEnabled = yes
timemachine:sharePointList:_array_id:/Volumes/New Volume 1/Shared Items/Backups:mountedOnPath = "/Volumes/New Volume 1" Additionally you can also query for the service to verify it’s running using full status: sudo serveradmin fullstatus timemachine Which outputs something similar to the following: timemachine:command = "getState"
timemachine:state = "RUNNING"
While I found plenty to ramble on about in this article, Mass deployment is still the same, as is client side configuration.

October 15th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Time Machine

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We covered using Time Machine Server previously. Here, we’re going to look at backing up the settings of an OS X Server. To do so, we’re going to install a little app called Bender from the great folks at Robot Cloud. You can download that from http://robotcloud.screenstepslive.com/s/2459/m/5322/l/94467-bender-automated-backup-of-os-x-server-settings. Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.51.00 PM Once downloaded, run the package installer. Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.49.32 PM At the Welcome to Bender screen, click Continue. Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.52.03 PM Agree to the licensing agreement by clicking the Continue button. Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.52.22 PM Click Agree again (assuming of course that you agree to the license). Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.52.57 PM Choose who you wish to install the software for and click Continue. Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 10.53.52 PM I’d go ahead and install Bender at the default location, so click Install. Once the installer is complete, you can view the installed LaunchDaemon at /Library/LaunchDaemons/net.robotcloud.bender.plist. Note that it calls the /usr/local/robotcloud/bin/bender binary when run at 22:00 every day. If you edit this file, the following settings are available: host=$(hostname) macOS=$(sw_vers | awk ‘/ProductVersion/{print substr($2,1,5)}’ | tr -d “.”) macSN=$(system_profiler SPHardwareDataType | awk ‘/Serial Number/{print $4}’) date=$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H%M) pass=$(system_profiler SPHardwareDataType | awk ‘/Hardware UUID/{print $3}’) logPath=”/usr/local/robotcloud/logs/bender.log” pipPath=”/usr/local/robotcloud/bin/scroobiuspip” pipTitle=”Bender Backup Error on: $macSN” backupDestination=”/Backups/$date” keepUntil=”14″ version=”2.3″ versionCheck=”$1″ The most important of these is the backupDestination. You can set this to be the /Backups folder as it is above, or set it to be an external drive. Either should be backed up using your standard backup software.

October 8th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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There’s a quick and easy IT Business Edge slideshow at http://www.itbusinessedge.com/slideshows/the-5-mobile-apps-you-really-need-for-smb-success.html that I helped with about 5 Mobile Apps You Really Need for SMB Success. Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 2.55.35 PM Hope you enjoy!

August 10th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel, iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure

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Yay, podcasts! Chuck Joiner was kind enough to have me on MacVoices. We did a show, now available at http://www.macvoices.com/macvoices-14223-charles-edge-helps-take-control-os-x-server Or if you’d like to watch on YouTube or inline: http://youtu.be/AeccoRqIrgc

November 26th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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WIndows Server’s ntbackup tools have become easier and easier to use over time. But there’s no more ntbackup. Well, there’s wbadmin, which is very similar. You can still restore data by downloading ntbackups restore tool at http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=974674.  Windows Backup is now capable of backing up a system with the same ease of use that Apple brought to automated backups with Time Machine and Time Machine Server. In fact, providing access to only a few more options Microsoft’s tools provide access to some pretty nice options, easily configured. To get started, you’ll first need to install the Windows Backup Role. To do so, use the Add Roles and Features Wizard in Windows Server 2012 to add the Windows Backup role. Once added, open Server Manager and then click on the Tools menu, selecting Windows Server Backup. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.02.23 PM From Windows Server backup, you can enter the name of an Azure account to configure cloud based backups. However, in this walkthrough we’re going to choose local backups, which really for us means to a network share rather than the cloud, although we could back up to a USB drive or some other internal drive as well. Click Local Backup, then click Configure. Click on Backup Schedule… to bring up the Backup Schedule Wizard. At the Getting Started screen, click on the Next button. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.02.56 PM At the Server Backup Configuration screen of the Backup Schedule Wizard, choose whether to back up all the data or perform a custom backup, which allows you to define only certain files to back up. I like to back up all the data for the most part, so we’re going to go with the full server and click Next. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.03.11 PM At the Specify Backup Time screen, choose the appropriate times of the day to back the server up and click on the Next button. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.03.52 PM At the Specify Destination Type screen, choose where you’d like to back your data up to and then click on the Next button. As mentioned, we’re going to back data up to a network share. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.04.07 PM At the Specify Remote Shared Folder screen, provide a path to the network path that you’d like to back your files up to. Screen Shot 2013-06-08 at 12.05.06 PM The backups should then be tested and validated before putting a system into long-term production. The command line tool used to manage backups is wbadmin. The wbadmin has the following verbs available to it:
  • enable backup – modifies existing backups or makes new schedules
  • disable backup – disables a backup schedule
  • start backup – starts a one-time backup job
  • stop job – stops running recovery or backup jobs that are currently in progress
  • get versions – shows the details of backups for recovery
  • get items – lists the contents of a backup
  • start recovery – runs a recovery job
  • get disks – shows online disks
  • get virtualmachines – shows Hyper-V VMs
  • start systemstaterecovery – recovers the system state backup from a valid system state backup
  • start systemstatebackup – makes a system state backup
  • delete systemstatebackup – deletes a system state backup
  • delete backup – deletes a backup
  • delete catalog – used if a catalog gets corrupt usually, to delete a catalog of backups
  • restore catalog – only use this option to attempt to fix corrupted catalogs, restores a catalog
Note: In addition to these options, there are even more commands available to Powershell. These are pretty well documented at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee706683.aspx. So while you will still need a 3rd party tool if you wish to backup to tape or you need very complex features, there’s now a very easy to use tool, that integrates cloud and local storage backups for Windows Server and is just about as easy to manage and configure as Apple’s Time Machine is on OS X or OS X Server.

June 13th, 2013

Posted In: Active Directory, Windows Server

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Arek Dreyer and Ben Greisler have been at it again. The latest editions of the Apple Training Series books are now out, providing a guide to getting certified with OS X Server. I haven’t gotten mine yet, but I suspect that the book, as with the previous books, will be excellent. To quote the book description:
The only Apple-certified book on OS X Server on Mountain Lion, this comprehensive reference takes support technicians and ardent Mac users deep inside the server for the latest operating system, covering everything from networking technologies to service administration, customizing users and groups, and more. Aligned to the learning objectives of the Apple Certified Technical Coordinator certification exam, the lessons in this self-paced volume serves as a perfect supplement to Apple’s own training class and a first-rate primer for computer support personnel who need to support and maintain OS X Server on Mountain Lion as part of their jobs. Step-by-step exercises reinforce the concepts taught through practical application. Quizzes summarize and reinforce acquired knowledge. The Newest version of OS X is more business-friendly than ever, making it simple to get a network up and running quickly, and IT professionals will need Server Essentials to integrate Macs into their organizations. The Apple Pro Training Series serves as both a self-paced learning tool and the official curriculum for the OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Server on Mountain Lion certification programs.
The Apple Support Essentials book is out as well (thanks, Mr. White!). Its description is as follows:
The only Apple-certified book on OS X Mountain Lion, this revised best-seller will take you deep inside the latest big-cat operating system–covering everything from installation and configuration, customizing the operating system, supporting applications, setting up peripherals, and more. Whether you’re a support technician or simply an ardent Mac user, you’ll quickly learn and master the new features in OS X Mountain Lion. Following the learning objectives of the Apple Certified Support Professional exam, this self-paced book is a perfect guide for Apple’s training and a first-rate primer for computer support personnel who need to troubleshoot and optimize OS X Mountain Lion as part of their jobs. Step-by-step exercises reinforce the concepts taught through practical application. Chapter review sections and quizzes summarize and reinforce acquired knowledge. The Apple Pro Training Series serves as both a self-paced learning tool and the official curriculum for OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Mountain Lion Server certification programs.

January 8th, 2013

Posted In: certifications, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I’m often asked what I think of upgrading the firmware on servers and storage.  My answer there, if it’s a production box and it isn’t broken then don’t fix it…  What if you’re upgrading the firmware on a RAID or RAID card and the device becomes unresponsive?  There’s usually a reason to upgrade, but if you are not experiencing problems then why risk a potential outage if you do not need to?

August 22nd, 2007

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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July 20th, 2007

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: ,