krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Mail is one of the hardest services to manage. Actually, mail is pretty simple in and of itself: there’s protocols people use to access their mail (such as IMAP and POP), protocols used to communicate between mail servers and send mail (SMTP, SMTPS) and then there’s a database of mail and user information. In Mavericks Server, all of these are represented by a single ON button, so it really couldn’t be easier. But then there’s the ecoysystem and the evil spammers. As a systems administrator of a large number of mail servers, I firmly believe that there is a special kind of hell where only spam is served at every meal for spammers. Here, the evil spammers must also read every piece of spam ever sent for eternity. By the end (aka Ragnarok), they should have the chemically induced stamina of a 16 year old with the latest Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, enough pills of other types to not be able to use that stamina, plenty of African princes looking to donate large sums of money if only they can be helped out of their country (which should cost about 100,000 compared to a 5,000,000 payout, not a bad ROI, right?!?!?), have their conflicting stamina situation at the top of the search engines and of course, have lost all of the money made from their African princes due to getting their credit card hijacked by about 9,000 phishing scams. All in all, a special kind of hell…  But back to the point of the article, setting up mail. The things that mail administrators need to focus on to keep that mail server flowing mail to and from everyone else in the world:
  • Static IP address. The WAN (and LAN probably) address should be static.
  • Port Forwards. Port forwards need to be configured on the gateway for the SMTP port at a minimum and more than likely other ports used to access mail on client devices (25, 143, etc)
  • DNS records. An MX record and some kind of mail.domain.com type of record should definitely be configured for the DNS servers that are authoritative for the domain. There should also be reverse records for the address of the server, usually created by the Internet Services Provider, or ISP, that match that record.
  • Check the RBLs. If you have a new IP address you’ll be putting a DNS server on, check all the major Realtime BlackLists to make sure that some evil spammer hasn’t squatted on the IP before you got to it. This is true whether you’re in a colo, hosted on an IP you own or moving into space formerly occupied by a very standup company. A lot of IP addresses are blocked, as are blocks of IPs, so before moving mail to an IP, check it.
  • Mail filtration (message hygiene). OS X Server has a number of mail filters built in, including clam for viruses, the ability to leverage RBLs, block specific addresses and of course RBL checking. However, this is often not enough. Third party services such as MXLogic help to keep mail from coming into your network. You also end up with an external IP to send mail that can cache mail in the event the server is down and keep mail off your network in the event that it’s spam.
  • Backup. I am firmly of the belief that I’d rather not have data than not have that data backed up…
Once all of that is taken care of (I’ll add more as I think about it) then it’s time to enable the mail service in the Server app running on Yosemite. Actually, first let’s setup our SSL certificates. To do so, open the Server app and click on Certificates in the SERVER section of the sidebar. Here, use the “Secure services using” drop-down list and click on Custom… for each protocol to select the appropriate certificate to be used for the service. Mail1 Click OK when they’re all configure. Now let’s enable the mail service (or outsource mail). To do so, open the Server app and click on Mail in the SERVICES list in the sidebar. Mail2 At the configuration screen is a sparse number of settings:
  • Provide mail for: Configures all of the domains the mail server will listen for mail for. Each account on the server has a short name and each domain name will be available for each short name. For example, an account with a shortname of charles will be available for email addresses of charles@pretendco.com and charles@krypted.com per the Domain Name listing below.Mail3
  • Authentication: Click Edit for a list of sources that accounts can authenticate against (e.g. Active Directory, Open Directory, Custom, Local, etc) and in some cases the specific password algorithms used for mail.Mail4
  • Push Notifications: If Push is configured previously there’s no need to use this option. Otherwise, use your institutional APNS account to configure Push Notifications.Mail5
  • Relay outgoing mail through ISP: Provide a server that all mail will get routed through from the server. For example, this might be an account with your Internet Services Provider (ISP), an account on an appliance that you own (such as a Barracuda) or with an external filtering service (such as MXLogic).Mail6
  • Limit mail to: Configure the total amount of mail a user can have in the mail store, in Megabytes.
  • Edit Filtering Settings: Configure antivirus, spam assassin and junk mail filters. The “Enable virus filtering” checkbox enables clam. The “Enable blacklist filtering” checks the RBL (or RBLs) of your choice to check whether a given server is a “known” spammer and the “Enable junk mail filtering” option enables spam assassin on the host, configuring it to block based on a score as selected using the slider.
Once you’ve configured the settings for the Mail service, click on the ON slider to enable the service. At this point, you should be able to telnet into port 25 of the host to verify that SMTP is listening, preferably from another mail server: telnet mail.krypted.com 25 You can also check that the mail services are running using the serveradmin command along with the fullstatus option for the mail service: sudo serveradmin fullstatus mail Which returns with some pretty verbose information about the service, including state, connections, running protocols and the rest of the following: mail:startedTime = ""
mail:setStateVersion = 1
mail:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:protocol = "IMAP"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:service = "MailAccess"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:0:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:protocol = "POP3"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:service = "MailAccess"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:1:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:protocol = "SMTP"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:service = "MailTransferAgent"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:2:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:kind = "OUTGOING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:protocol = "SMTP"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:service = "MailTransferAgent"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:3:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:status = "OFF"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:protocol = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:service = "ListServer"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:4:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:protocol = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:service = "JunkMailFilter"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:5:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:protocol = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:service = "VirusScanner"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:6:error = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:status = "ON"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:kind = "INCOMING"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:protocol = ""
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:state = "STOPPED"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:service = "VirusDatabaseUpdater"
mail:protocolsArray:_array_index:7:error = ""
mail:logPaths:Server Error Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/mail-err.log"
mail:logPaths:IMAP Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/mail-info.log"
mail:logPaths:Server Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/mail-info.log"
mail:logPaths:POP Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/mail-info.log"
mail:logPaths:SMTP Log = "/var/log/mail.log"
mail:logPaths:List Server Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/listserver.log"
mail:logPaths:Migration Log = "/Library/Logs/MailMigration.log"
mail:logPaths:Virus Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/clamav.log"
mail:logPaths:Amavisd Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/amavis.log"
mail:logPaths:Virus DB Log = "/Library/Logs/Mail/freshclam.log"
mail:imapStartedTime = ""
mail:postfixStartedTime = ""
mail:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
mail:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
mail:connectionCount = 0
mail:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1
mail:serviceStatus = "DISABLED" To stop the service: sudo serveradmin stop mail And to start it back up: sudo serveradmin start mail To configure some of the settings no longer in the GUI from previous versions, let’s look at the full list of options: sudo serveradmin settings mail One that is commonly changed is the subject line added to messages that are marked as spam by spam assassin. This is stored in mail:postfix:spam_subject_tag, so changing would be: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:spam_subject_tag = "***DIEEVILSPAMMERSDIE*** " A number of admins also choose to disable greylisting, done using the mail:postfix:greylist_disable option: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:greylist_disable = no To configure an email address for quarantined mail to go, use mail:postfix:virus_quarantine: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:virus_quarantine = "diespammersdie@krypted.com" The administrator, by default, doesn’t get an email when an email containing a file infected with a virus is sent through the server. To enable this option: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:virus_notify_admin = yes I also find a lot of Mac environments want to accept email of pretty much any size. By default, message size limits are enabled. To disable: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:message_size_limit_enabled = yes Or even better, just set new limit: sudo serveradmin settings mail:postfix:message_size_limit = 10485760 And to configure the percentage of someone’s quota that kicks an alert (soft quota): sudo serveradmin settings mail:imap:quotawarn = 75 Additionally, the following arrays are pretty helpful, which used to have GUI options:
  • mail:postfix:mynetworks:_array_index:0 = “127.0.0.0/8″ – Add entries to this one to add “local” clients
  • mail:postfix:host_whitelist = _empty_array – Add whitelisted hosts
  • mail:postfix:blacklist_from = _empty_array – Add blacklisted hosts
  • mail:postfix:black_hole_domains:_array_index:0 = “zen.spamhaus.org” – Add additional RBL Servers
The client side of the mail service is straight forward enough. If you are wondering where in this article we discuss using webmail, er, that’s not installed by default any longer. But the open source project previously used, roundcube, is still available for download and easily installed (the pre-reqs are all there, already). Check out the roundcube wiki installation page here for more info on that. Also, mail groups. I hope to have a post about that soon enough. Unless, of course, I get sidetracked with having a life. Which is arguably not very likely…

October 17th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Microsoft Exchange Server

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OS X Yosemite running the Server comes with the /usr/sbin/serverinfo command (introduced in Mountain Lion Server). The serverinfo command is useful when programmatically obtaining information about the very basic state of an Apple Server. The first option indicates whether the Server app has been downloaded from the app store, which is the –software option: serverinfo --software When used, this option reports the following if the Server.app can be found: This system has server software installed. Or if the software cannot be found, the following is indicated: This system does NOT have server software installed. The –productname option determines the name of the software app: serverinfo --productname If you change the name of the app from Server then the server info command won’t work any longer, so the output should always be the following: Server The –shortversion command returns the version of the Server app being used: serverinfo --shortversion The output will not indicate a build number, but instead the version of the app on the computer the command is run on: 3.5.5 To see the build number (which should iterate with each update to the Server app from the Mac App Store, use the –buildversion option: serverinfo --buildversion The output shows the build of server, which doesn’t necessarily match the OS X build number: 14S274j Just because the Server app has been downloaded doesn’t mean the Server setup assistant has been run. To see if it has, use the –configured option: serverinfo --configured The output indicates whether the system is running as a server or just has the app installed (e.g. if you’re using it to connect to another server: This system has server software configured. You can also output all of the information into a single, easy to script against property list using the –plist option: serverinfo --plist The output is a list of each of the other options used: IsOSXServerVolume IsOSXServerVolumeConfigured IsServerHardware LocalizedServerProductName Server ServerBuildVersion 14S274j ServerPerformanceModeEnabled ServerVersion 3.5.5 The Server Root can reside in a number of places. To see the path (useful when scripting commands that are relative to the ServerRoot: serverinfo —prefix By default, the output is as follows, which is basically like a dirname of the ServerRoot: /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot You can also see whether the system is running on actual hardware desgnated by Apple for servers using the –hardware option: serverinfo --hardware The output simply indicates if the hardware shipped with OS X Server on it from Apple: This system is NOT running on server hardware. The –perfmode option indicates whether or not the performance mode has been enabled, dedicating resources to binaries within the Server app: serverinfo --perfmode If the performance mode has not been enabled then the output will be as such: Server performance mode is NOT enabled. To enable performance mode, you can also use serverinfo. This is the only task that the command does that can make any changes to the system and as such is the only time you need to elevate privileges: sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 1 Or set the boolean value back to 0 to disable. sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 0

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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Open Directory has never been so easy to setup for a basic environment as it is in OS X Yosemite Server (OS X 10.10, Server app 4). It’s also never been so annoyingly simple to use that to do anything cool requires a bunch of command line foo. No offense to the developers, but this whole idea that the screens that were being continually refined for a decade just need to be thrown out and started fresh seems to have led to a few babies thrown out along with them. Not often as I’m kinda’ digging most of the new config screens in OS X Yosemite Server, but with Open Directory, it’s just too easy. Features mean buttons. Buttons make things a tad bit more complicated to use than an ON/OFF switch… Anyway, rant over. Moving on. As with almost any previous version of OS X Server and Open Directory, once you’ve installed the Server app, run the changeip command along with the -checkhostname option to verify that the IP, DNS and hostname match. If (and only if as it will fail if you try anyway) you get an indication of “Success.” bash-3.2# changeip -checkhostname dirserv:success = "success" To set up the Open Directory Master, open the Server app and click on the Open Directory service (might need to Show under Advanced in the Server app sidebar). From here, click on the ON button. ODM1 For the purposes of this example, we’re setting up an entirely new Open Directory environment. At the “Configure Network Users and Groups” screen, click on “Create a new Open Directory Domain” and click on the Next button. ODM2 Note: If you are restoring an archive of an existing Open Directory domain, you would select the bottom option from this list. At the Directory Administrator screen, enter a username and password for the directory administrator account. The default account is sufficient, although it’s never a bad idea to use something a bit less generic. ODM3 Once you’ve entered the username and password, click on the Next button. Then we’re going to configure the SSL information. ODM4 At the Organization Information screen, enter a name for the organization in the Organization Name field and an Email Address to be used in the SSL certificate in the Admin Email Address field. Click on Next. ODM5 At the Confirm Settings screen, make sure these very few settings are OK with you and then click on the Set Up button to let slapconfig (the command that runs the OD setup in the background, kinda’ like a cooler dcpromo) do its thing. When the Open Directory master has been configured, there’s no need to reboot or anything, the indicator light for the Open Directory service should appear. If the promotion fails then look to the preflight options I wrote up awhile back. ODM6 Clicking on the minus (“-”) button while a server is highlighted runs a slapconfig -destroyldapserver on the server and destroys the Open Directory domain if it is the only server. All domain information is lost when this happens.

ODM7

Next, let’s bind a client. Binding clients can be done in a few different ways. You can use a script, a Profile, the Users & Groups System Preference pane or build binding into the imaging process. For the purpose of this example, we’ll use the System Preference pane. To get started, open up the System Preference pane and then click on Users & Groups. From here, click on Login Options and then unlock the lock in the lower left corner of the screen, providing a username and password when prompted. ODM8 Click on the Edit… button and then the plus sign (“+”).

ODM9

Then, enter the name of the Open Directory Master (the field will expand with options when you enter the host name. ODM10 It’s probably best not to use the IP address at this point as the master will have an SSL certificate tied to the name. Click OK to accept the certificate (if it’s self-signed) and then the system should finish binding. Once bound, I like to use either id or dscl to verify that directory accounts are properly resolving before I try logging in as an Open Directory user. Provided everything works that’s it. The devil is of course in the details. There is very little data worth having if it isn’t backed up. Notice that you can archive by clicking on the cog wheel icon in the Open Directory service pane, much like you could in Server Admin. Or, because this helps when it comes to automating backups (with a little expect), to run a backup from the command line, run the slapconfig command along with the -backupdb option followed by a path to a folder to back the data up to: sudo slapconfig -backupdb /odbackups The result will be a request for a password then a bunch of information about the backup: bash-3.2# sudo slapconfig -backupdb /odbackups 2014-09-23 00:26:01 +0000 slapconfig -backupdb Enter archive password: 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 1 Backing up LDAP database 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /usr/sbin/slapcat -l /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/backup.ldif, "r" 5420be1e bdb_monitor_db_open: monitoring disabled; configure monitor database to enable 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /usr/sbin/slapcat -b cn=authdata -l /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/authdata.ldif, "r" 5420be1e bdb_monitor_db_open: monitoring disabled; configure monitor database to enable 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp /var/db/openldap/openldap-data/DB_CONFIG /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/DB_CONFIG, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp /var/db/openldap/authdata//DB_CONFIG /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/authdata_DB_CONFIG, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp -r /etc/openldap /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/hostname > /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/hostname, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /usr/sbin/sso_util info -pr /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1 > /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/local_odkrb5realm, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /usr/bin/tar czpf /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/krb5backup.tar.gz /var/db/krb5kdc/kdc.conf /var/db/krb5kdc/acl_file.* /var/db/krb5kdc/m_key.* /etc/krb5.keytab , "r" tar: Removing leading '/' from member names 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 2 Backing up Kerberos database 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp /var/db/dslocal/nodes/Default/config/KerberosKDC.plist /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/KerberosKDC.plist, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp /Library/Preferences/com.apple.openldap.plist /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 3 Backing up configuration files 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /usr/bin/sw_vers > /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/version.txt, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 popen: /bin/cp -r /var/db/dslocal /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX/, "r" 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 Backed Up Keychain 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 4 Backing up CA certificates 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 5 Creating archive 2014-09-23 00:26:06 +0000 command: /usr/bin/hdiutil create -ov -plist -puppetstrings -layout UNIVERSAL CD -fs HFS+ -volname ldap_bk -srcfolder /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX -format SPARSE -encryption AES-256 -stdinpass /odbackups 2014-09-23 00:26:12 +0000 Removed directory at path /tmp/slapconfig_backup_stage57244NLmNnX. 2014-09-23 00:26:12 +0000 Removed file at path /var/run/slapconfig.lock. To restore a database (such as from a previous version of the operating system where such an important option was actually present) use the following command (which just swaps backupdb with -restoredb) sudo slapconfig -restoredb /odbackups Both commands ask you for a password to encrypt and decrypt the disk image created by them.

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , ,

The NetBoot service allows administrators of OS X computers to leverage images hosted on a server to boot computers to a central location and put a new image on them, upgrade them and perform automations based on upgrades and images. Since the very first versions of OS X, the service has been called NetBoot. In the Server app, Apple provides a number of options surrounding the NetInstall service, based on Automator-style actions, now calling the service NetInstall. The first step to configuring the NetInstall service is to decide what you want the service to do. There are three options available in System Image Utility (available under the Tools menu of the Server app in OS X Server):
  • Create a NetBoot Image: Allows Macs to boot over the network to a disk image hosted on a server.
  • Create a NetInstall Image: Leverage NetBoot as a boot disk so that an image hosted on a server can be used to run an OS X installer.
  • Create a NetRestore Image: Leverage NetBoot as a boot disk so that you can restore a computer that has been configured over a network. Use this option to restore an image that has been prepared.
For the purposes of this example, we’re going to use an OS X Yosemite (10.10) installer running Server 3 to boot an OS X computer over the network. The first step in doing so is to create a Network Disk Image of 10.10, or the 10.10 installation media (which is the Install OS X Yosemite bundle for this example). Before setting it up, download the Install OS X Yosemite installer app into the /Applications directory from the App Store. To then set up the NetBoot disk image (you can’t start the NetInstall service until you give it an image to serve), often referred to as the NetBoot set, open the Server app and then click on System Image Utility from the Tools menu of OS X. netinstall1 When System Image Utility opens, click on the Install OS X Yosemite entry in the list of available sources. Then, in the list of options, click on NetInstall Image and then click on the Continue button. netinstall2 At the Image Settings screen, enter the name the NetBoot set will have in the Network Disk field. Then, enter a description of what is on the NetBoot set in the Description field. If the image will be served from multiple servers, check the box for “Image will be served from more than one server.” Then provide an account name, short name and password in the Image Settings screen. Once provided, click Create to generate the Network Disk Image. netinstall3 When prompted, click on the Agree button to accept the licensing agreement. netinstall4 Then, when prompted, select a location to store the Disk Image, provide any tags to be applied to the files that comprise the image and click on Save. Netinstall5 The computer will then start creating the NetBoot set. Once finished, it’s time to set up the NetInstall service in OS X Yosemite Server. To get started, go back to the Server app. Netinstall6 First, define which disk will host NetBoot Images. To do so, click on the Edit Storage Settings button. At the Storage Settings overlay, select the volume that Images will be hosted as well as the volume that Client Data will be hosted. The Image is what you are creating and the Client Data is dynamic data stored in images. netinstall7 If you only have one disk, as in this example, click on “Images & Client Data” for that disk. Then click on the OK button. Once you’ve selected a disk to store your image, we need to copy the disk image into the Library/NetBoot/NetBootSP0 folder of the disk used for images. Once in the appropriate folder, click on the Edit button for the Enable NetInstall on: field netinstall8 Check the box for the interface you want to serve images over (if you only have one then it’s pretty obvious which interface this will be. Click on the OK button to save your settings. Then, click on the Images tab. netinstall9 Each server can host multiple images. The Images tab displays a list of NetBoot images stored in the Library/NetBoot/NetBootSP0 directory. By default, images have a red indicator light. This means they’re not being served over any specific protocol yet. Double-click on an image. netinstall10 At the image settings screen, check the box for “Make available over” and for many environments, select NFS as the protocol. Note, you can also restrict access to the image to certain models of Apple computers and/or certain MAC addresses by using the “Image is visible to” and “Restrict access to this images” options respectively. Additionally, use the Make this image available for diskless booting option to allow computers without hard drives to boot to the image. netinstall11 Click on the Done button and the image will appear as green in the list of images. Click on the image and then click on the cog-wheel icon. Click on “Use as Default Boot Image” to set an image to be the default images computers boot to when booting to NetBoot. Now, it’s as easy as clicking on the ON button. Do so to start the service. netinstall12 Once started, open a Terminal window. Here, let’s get a status of the service using the serveradmin fullstatus option (along with the service name, which is still netboot from the command line): sudo serveradmin fullstatus netboot The output of which shows the various components, logs and states of components: netboot:state = “RUNNING”
netboot:stateTFTP = “RUNNING”
netboot:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1
netboot:netBootConnectionsArray = _empty_array
netboot:logPaths:netBootLog = “/var/log/system.log”
netboot:dhcpLeasesArray = _empty_array
netboot:stateDHCP = “STOPPED”
netboot:stateHTTP = “RUNNING”
netboot:serviceCanStart = 0
netboot:timeOfSnapshot = “2014-10-07 18:39:33 +0000″
netboot:stateNFS = “RUNNING”
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:0:_array_index:0 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:0:_array_index:1 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:0:_array_index:2 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:0:_array_index:3 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:0:_array_index:4 = 2
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:1:_array_index:0 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:1:_array_index:1 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:1:_array_index:2 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:1:_array_index:3 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:1:_array_index:4 = 2
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:2:_array_index:0 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:2:_array_index:1 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:2:_array_index:2 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:2:_array_index:3 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:2:_array_index:4 = 2
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:3:_array_index:0 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:3:_array_index:1 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:3:_array_index:2 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:3:_array_index:3 = 0
netboot:stateImageArray:_array_index:3:_array_index:4 = 2
netboot:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
netboot:netBootClientsArray = _empty_array
netboot:servicePortsAreRestricted = “NO”
netboot:setStateVersion = 1
netboot:startedTime = “”
netboot:stateAFP = “RUNNING” And to start the service when not running: sudo serveradmin start netboot There are also a number of settings available at the command line that are not in the graphical interface. For example, to allow writing to the NetBoot share: sudo serveradmin settings netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:readOnlyShare = no Or to get more verbose logs: sudo serveradmin settings netboot:logging_level = “HIGH” To stop the service: sudo serveradmin stop netboot In the beginning of this article, I mentioned that ways to configure NetInstall images. I’ll cover NetInstall and NetRestore in later articles as they tend to be more involved workflow-wise than copying a volume into a Network Disk Image. But to end this one, many an old-school admin might wonder where all the settings went that used to be in the GUI. Well, serveradmin still maintains a lot of the older stuff. To see a list of all available settings, run serveradmin with the settings verb and then netboot: sudo serveradmin settings netboot If there was a feature you want to use (e.g. maximum users), you should see it in the resultant list: netboot:netBootFiltersRecordsArray = _empty_array
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:sharepoint = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:clients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:volType = “hfs”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:okToDeleteSharepoint = no
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:readOnlyShare = no
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:path = “/”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:okToDeleteClients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:0:volName = “Yos”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:sharepoint = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:clients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:volType = “hfs”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:okToDeleteSharepoint = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:readOnlyShare = no
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:path = “/Volumes/Base_Image”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:okToDeleteClients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:1:volName = “Base_Image”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:sharepoint = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:clients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:volType = “hfs”
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:okToDeleteSharepoint = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:readOnlyShare = no
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:path = “/Volumes/New Volume 1″
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:okToDeleteClients = yes
netboot:netBootStorageRecordsArray:_array_index:2:volName = “New Volume”
netboot:netBootPortsRecordsArray:_array_index:0:deviceAtIndex = “en3″
netboot:netBootPortsRecordsArray:_array_index:0:isEnabledAtIndex = yes
netboot:netBootPortsRecordsArray:_array_index:0:nameAtIndex = “USB Ethernet”
netboot:logging_level = “MEDIUM”
netboot:filterEnabled = no
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:imageType = “netboot”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:IsInstall = no
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Kind = “1”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:0 = “iMac10,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:1 = “iMac11,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:2 = “iMac11,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:3 = “iMac11,3″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:4 = “iMac12,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:5 = “iMac12,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:6 = “iMac13,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:7 = “iMac13,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:8 = “iMac13,3″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:9 = “iMac7,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:10 = “iMac8,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:11 = “iMac9,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:12 = “Mac-031B6874CF7F642A”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:13 = “Mac-27ADBB7B4CEE8E61″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:14 = “Mac-50619A408DB004DA”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:15 = “Mac-77EB7D7DAF985301″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:16 = “MacBook5,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:17 = “MacBook5,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:18 = “MacBook6,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:19 = “MacBook7,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:20 = “MacBookAir2,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:21 = “MacBookAir3,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:22 = “MacBookAir3,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:23 = “MacBookAir4,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:24 = “MacBookAir4,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:25 = “MacBookAir5,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:26 = “MacBookAir5,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:27 = “MacBookAir6,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:28 = “MacBookAir6,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:29 = “MacBookPro10,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:30 = “MacBookPro10,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:31 = “MacBookPro3,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:32 = “MacBookPro4,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:33 = “MacBookPro5,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:34 = “MacBookPro5,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:35 = “MacBookPro5,3″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:36 = “MacBookPro5,4″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:37 = “MacBookPro5,5″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:38 = “MacBookPro6,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:39 = “MacBookPro6,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:40 = “MacBookPro7,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:41 = “MacBookPro8,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:42 = “MacBookPro8,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:43 = “MacBookPro8,3″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:44 = “MacBookPro9,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:45 = “MacBookPro9,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:46 = “Macmini3,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:47 = “Macmini4,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:48 = “Macmini5,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:49 = “Macmini5,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:50 = “Macmini5,3″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:51 = “Macmini6,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:52 = “Macmini6,2″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:53 = “MacPro3,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:54 = “MacPro4,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:55 = “MacPro5,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:DisabledSystemIdentifiers:_array_index:56 = “Xserve3,1″
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Description = “NetBoot of OS X 10.10 (13A598) Install (7.14 GB).”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Name = “NetBoot of Install OS X Yosemite”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:pathToImage = “/Library/NetBoot/NetBootSP0/NetBoot of Install OS X Yosemite.nbi/NBImageInfo.plist”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Index = 1280
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:osVersion = “10.10”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:BackwardCompatible = no
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:SupportsDiskless = no
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:EnabledSystemIdentifiers = _empty_array
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Language = “Default”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:BootFile = “booter”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:IsDefault = no
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Type = “HTTP”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:Architectures = “4”
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:IsEnabled = yes
netboot:netBootImagesRecordsArray:_array_index:0:RootPath = “NetBoot.dmg”
netboot:afpUsersMax = “50”

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Uncategorized

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

There are a number of ways to create groups in OS X Mavericks Server (Server 3). The first is using the Server app, the second is using Workgroup Manager (which could be running on an older operating system and connecting to the Mavericks Server in question), the third is using the Users & Groups System Preference pane and the fourth is using the command line. In this article we will look at creating groups in the Server app.

Once a server has been an Open Directory Master all user and group accounts created will be in the Local Network Group when created in Server app. Before that, all user and group objects are stored locally when created in Server app. Once promoted to an Open Directory server, local groups must be created in Workgroup Manager, the Users & Groups System Preference pane or using a command line tool appropriate for group management.

 To create a new group, open the Server app and then click on Groups in the ACCOUNTS list of the Server app sidebar. From here, you can switch between the various directory domains accessible to the server using the drop-down list available. Click on the plus sign to create a local network group.

Groups1

At the New Group screen, provide a name for the group in the Full Name field. This can have spaces. Then create a short name for the group in the Group Name field. This should not have spaces.

Groups2

Click Done when you have supplied the appropriate information and the group is created. Once done, double-click on the group to see more options.

Groups3

Here, use the plus sign (“+”) to add members to the group or highlight members and use the minus sign (“-”) to remove users from the group. You can also choose to use the following options:

  • Give this group a shared folder: Creates a shared directory for the group, or a group with an ACL that grants all group members access.
  • Make group members Messages buddies: Adds each group member to each other group members buddy list in the Messages client.
  • Enable group mailing list: Enables a list using the short name of the group where all members receive emails to that address.
  • Create Group Wiki: Opens the Wiki interface for creating a wiki for the group.
  • Keywords: Keywords/tags to help locate users.
  • Notes: Notes about users.

Once changes have been made, click Done to commit the changes.

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

DHCP, or Dynamic Host Control Protocol, is the service used to hand out IP addresses and other network settings by network appliances and servers. The DHCP Server built into OS X Server 3, installed on Yosemite running the Server app (aka Yosemite frickin’ server) is easy-to-use and fast. It’s pretty transparent, just as DHCP services should be. To install the service, open the Server app and then click on the Show button beside Advanced in the server sidebar. Then click on DHCP.

DHCP1

At the DHCP screen, you’ll see two tabs: Settings, used for managing the service and Clients, used to see DHCP leases in use by computers that obtain IP address information from the server. You’ll also see an ON and OFF switch, but we’re going to configure our scopes, or Networks as they appear in the Server app, before we enable the service. To configure a scope, double-click on the first entry in the Networks list.

DHCP2

Each scope, or Network, will have the following options:

  • Name: A name for the scope, used only on the server to keep track of things.
  • Lease Duration: Select an hour, a day, a week or 30 days. This is how long a lease that is provided to a client is valid before the lease expires and the client must find a new lease, either from the server you’re configuring or a different host.
  • Network Interface: The network interface you’d like to share IPs over. Keep in mind that you can tag multiple VLANs on a NIC, assign each an interface in OS X and therefore provide different scopes for different VLANs with the same physical computer and NIC.
  • Starting IP Address: The first IP address used. For example, if you configure a scope to go from 192.168.210.200 to 192.168.210.250 you would have 50 useable IP addresses.
  • Ending IP Address: The last IP address used in a scope.
  • Subnet Mask: The subnet mask used for the client configuration. This setting determines the size of the network.
  • Router: The default gateway, or router for the network. Often a .1 address for the subnet used in the Starting and Ending IP address fields. Note that while in DHCP you don’t actually have to use a gateway, OS X Server does force you to do so or you cannot save changes to each scope.
  • DNS: Use the Edit button for DNS to bring up a screen that allows you to configure the DNS settings provided as part of each DHCP scope you create, taking note that by default you will be handing out a server of 0.0.0.0 if you don’t configure this setting.

The DNS settings in the DHCP scope are really just the IP addresses to use for the DNS servers and the search domain. The search domain is the domain name appended to all otherwise incomplete Fully Qualified Domain Names. For example, if we use internal.krypted.lan and we have a DNS record for wiki.internal.krypted.lan then we could just type wiki into Safari to bring up the wiki server. Click the minus sign button to remove any data in these fields and then click on the plus sign to enter new values.

DHCP3

Click OK to save DNS settings and then OK to save each scope. Once you’ve build all required scopes, start the service. Once started, verify that a new client on the network gets an IP. Also, make sure that there are no overlapping scopes and that if you are moving a scope from one device to another (e.g. the server you’re setting up right now) that you renew all leases on client systems, most easily done using a quick reboot, or using “ipconfig /release” on a Windows computer. If you have problems with leases not renewing in OS X, check out this article I did awhile back.

So far, totally easy. Each time you make a change, the change updates a few different things. First, it updates the /etc/bootpd.plist property list, which looks something like this (note the correlation between these keys and the settings in the above screen shots.:





NetBoot

Subnets


allocate

dhcp_domain_name
no-dns-available.example.com
dhcp_domain_name_server

0.0.0.0

dhcp_domain_search

dhcp_router
192.168.210.1
lease_max
3600
name
192.168.210 Wi-Fi
net_address
192.168.210.0
net_mask
255.255.255.0
net_range

192.168.210.200
192.168.210.253

selected_port_name
en0
uuid
B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E


allow

bootp_enabled

deny

detect_other_dhcp_server

dhcp_enabled

old_netboot_enabled

relay_enabled

relay_ip_list




Settings from this file include:

  • dhcp_enabled – Used to enable dhcp for each network interface. Replace the immediately below with en0 . For additional entries, duplice the string line and enter each from ifconfig that you’d like to use dhcp on.
  • bootp_enabled – This can be left as Disabled or set to an array of the adapters that should be enabled if you wish to use the bootp protocol in addition to dhcp. Note that the server can do both bootp and dhcp simultaneously.
  • allocate – Use the allocate key for each subnet in the Subnets array to enable each subnet once the service is enabled.
  • Subnets – Use this array to create additional scopes or subnets that you will be serving up DHCP for. To do so, copy the entry in the array and paste it immediately below the existing entry. The entry is a dictionary so copy all of the data between and including the and immediately after the entry for the subnet itself.
  • lease_max and lease_min – Set these integers to the time for a client to retain its dhcp lease
  • name – If there are multiple subnet entries, this should be unique and reference a friendly name for the subnet itself.
  • net_address – The first octets of the subnet followed by a 0. For example, assuming a /24 and 172.16.25 as the first three octets the entry would be 172.16.25.0.
  • net_mask – The subnet mask clients should have
  • net_range – The first entry should have the first IP in the range and the last should have the last IP in the range. For example, in the following example the addressing is 172.16.25.2 to 172.16.25.253.
  • dhcp_domain_name_server – There should be a string for each DNS server supplied by dhcp in this array
  • dhcp_domain_search – Each domain in the domain search field should be suppled in a string within this array, if one is needed. If not, feel free to delete the key and the array if this isn’t needed.
  • dhcp_router – This entry should contain the router or default gateway used for clients on the subnet, if there is one. If not, you can delete the key and following string entries.

If you run the serveradmin command, followed by the settings verb and then the dhcp service, you’ll see the other place that gets updated:

serveradmin settings dhcp

The output indicates that:

dhcp:static_maps = _empty_array
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:WINS_secondary_server = ""
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:selected_port_name = "en0"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_router = "192.168.210.1"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_domain_name_server:_array_index:0 = "192.168.210.2"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:net_mask = "255.255.255.0"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:WINS_NBDD_server = ""
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:net_range_start = "192.168.210.200"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:lease_max = 3600
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_domain_search:_array_index:0 = "internal.krypted.lan"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:descriptive_name = "192.168.210 Wi-Fi"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:WINS_primary_server = ""
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:net_range_end = "192.168.210.253"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_ldap_url = _empty_array
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:WINS_node_type = "NOT_SET"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:net_address = "192.168.210.0"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_enabled = yes
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:dhcp_domain_name = "internal.krypted.lan"
dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:WINS_scope_id = ""
dhcp:subnet_defaults:logVerbosity = "MEDIUM"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type_list:_array_index:0 = "BROADCAST_B_NODE"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type_list:_array_index:1 = "HYBRID_H_NODE"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type_list:_array_index:2 = "NOT_SET"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type_list:_array_index:3 = "PEER_P_NODE"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type_list:_array_index:4 = "MIXED_M_NODE"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:dhcp_domain_name = "no-dns-available.example.com"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:WINS_node_type = "NOT_SET"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:routers = _empty_dictionary
dhcp:subnet_defaults:logVerbosityList:_array_index:0 = "LOW"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:logVerbosityList:_array_index:1 = "MEDIUM"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:logVerbosityList:_array_index:2 = "HIGH"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:dhcp_domain_name_server:_array_index:0 = "192.168.210.201"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:selected_port_key = "en0"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:selected_port_key_list:_array_index:0 = "bridge0"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:selected_port_key_list:_array_index:1 = "en0"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:selected_port_key_list:_array_index:2 = "p2p0"
dhcp:subnet_defaults:selected_port_key_list:_array_index:3 = "en1"
dhcp:logging_level = "MEDIUM"

Notice the correlation between the uuid string in /etc/bootp.plist and the arrayid entry for each subnet/network/scope (too many terms referring to the same thing, ahhhh!). Using the serveradmin command you can configure a lot more than you can configure in the Server app gui. For example, on a dedicated DHCP server, you could increase logging level to HIGH (as root/with sudo of course):

serveradmin settings dhcp:logging_level = "MEDIUM"

You can also change settings within a scope. For example, if you realized that you were already using 192.168.210.200 and 201 for statically assigned IPs elsewhere you can go ahead and ssh into the server and change the first IP in a scope to 202 using the following (assuming the uuid of the domain is the same as in the previous examples):

serveradmin settings dhcp:subnets:_array_id:B03BAE3C-AB79-4108-9E5E-F0ABAF32179E:net_range_start = "192.168.210.202"

You can also obtain some really helpful information using the fullstatus verb with serveradmin:

serveradmin fullstatus dhcp

This output includes the number of active leases, path to log file (tailing that file is helpful when troubleshooting issues), static mappings (configured using the command line if needed), etc.

dhcp:state = "RUNNING"
dhcp:backendVersion = "10.5"
dhcp:timeOfModification = "2014-10-04 04:24:17 +0000"
dhcp:numDHCPActiveClients = 0
dhcp:timeOfSnapShot = "2014-10-04 04:24:19 +0000"
dhcp:dhcpLeasesArray = _empty_array
dhcp:logPaths:systemLog = "/var/log/system.log"
dhcp:numConfiguredStaticMaps = 1
dhcp:timeServiceStarted = "2014-10-04 04:24:17 +0000"
dhcp:setStateVersion = 1
dhcp:numDHCPLeases = 21
dhcp:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1

Once started, configure reservations using  the /etc/bootptab file. This file should have a column for the name of a computer, the hardware type (1), the hwaddr (the MAC address) and ipaddr for the desired IP address of each entry:

%%
# hostname hwtype hwaddr ipaddr bootfile
a.krypted.lan 1 00:00:00:aa:bb:cc 192.168.210.230
b.krypted.lan 1 00:00:00:aa:bb:cc 192.168.210.240

You can start and stop the service either using the serveradmin command:

serveradmin stop dhcp
serveradmin start dhcp

Or using the launchctl:

sudo /bin/launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/bootps.plist
sudo ; /bin/launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/bootps.plist

On the clients, you can then use ifconfig followed by the getpacket verb and then an interface connected to the same network as the DHCP server in order to see the information supplied by the dhcp service, including the system that provided the DHCP lease to the client computers.

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure

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OS X Server (Yosemite 10.10 running Server 3.5 has an adaptive firewall built in, or a firewall that controls incoming access based on clients attempting to abuse the server. The firewall automatically blocks incoming connections that it considers to be dangerous. For example, if a client attempts too many incorrect logins then a firewall rule restricts that user from attempting to communicate with the server for 15 minutes. If you’re troubleshooting and you accidentally tripped up one of these rules then it can be a bit frustrating. Which is why Apple gives us afctl, a tool that interacts with the adaptive firewall. The most basic task you can do with the firewall is to disable all of the existing rules. To do so, simply run afctl (all afctl options require sudo) with a -d option: afctl -d When run, the adaptive firewall’s rules are disabled. To re-enable them, use the -e option: afctl -e Turning off the rules seems a bit much for most troubleshooting tasks. To remove a specific IP address that has been blacklisted, use the -r option followed by the IP address (rules are enforced by IP): afctl -r 192.168.210.69 To add an IP to the blacklist, use the -a option, also followed by the IP: afctl -a 192.168.210.69 To permanently add a machine to the whitelist, use -w with the IP: afctl -w 192.168.210.69 To remove an IP from that whitelist, use -x: afctl -x 192.168.210.69 To straight up disable afctl, use -X: afctl -X To turn it back on, use -f: afctl -f You can also set the number of bad attempts before a host gets automatically added to the blacklist using -T: afctl -T 5 To understand what is going on under the hood, consider this. The blacklisted computers are stored in plain text in /var/db/af/blacklist and the whitelisted computers are stored in the same path in a file called whitelist. The afctl binary itself is stored in /usr/libexec/afctl and the service is enabled by /System/LIbrary/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.afctl.plist, meaning to stop the service outright, use launchctl: launchctl unload com.apple.afctl.plist The configuration file for afctl is at /etc/af.plist. Here you can change the path to the blacklist and whitelist files, change the interval with which it is run, etc. Overall, the adaptive firewall is a nice little tool for Mac OS X Server security, but also something a number of open source tools can do as well. But for something built-in and easy, worth using. There’s a nice little command called hb_summary located in /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/CoreServices/AdaptiveFirewall.bundle/Contents/MacOS that provides statistics for blocked hosts. To see statistics about how much the Adaptive Firewall is being used, just run the command with no options: /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/CoreServices/AdaptiveFirewall.bundle/Contents/MacOS/hb_summary The output provides the following information (helpful if plugging this information into a tool like Splunk): • Date • Date statistics start • Number of hosts blocked • Addresses blocked • Number of times each address was blocked • Last time a host was blocked • Total number of times a block was issued In the past 23 hours 59 minutes the following hosts were blocked by the Adaptive Firewall from 2014-09-13 06:10:54 +0000 to 2014-09-14 06:10:53 +0000 Address Count(Total) Last Block Time 0 unique hosts 0 total blocks 0 overall Count indicates the number of times a host was blocked during this reporting period. Total indicates the total number of times this host was blocked in the last week See the “Security:Firewall Service” section of http://help.apple.com/advancedserveradmin/ for more information about the Adaptive Firewall. You can also use the -v argument in order to run commands verbosely.

October 16th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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