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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

There are a number of ways to see information about what version of Linux that you’re running on different cat /etc/lsb-release Which returns the distribution information, parsed as follows: DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu DISTRIB_RELEASE=12.04.5 DISTRIB_CODENAME=precise DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS)" LSB_release can also be run as a command, as follows: lsb_release -a Which returns the following: No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu Description: Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (LTS) Release: 12.04.5 Codename: precise lab_release can be used as a command as well: cat /etc/issue.net Which returns: Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (development branch) In Debian, you can simply look at the version file: cat /etc/debian_version Which returns the following: wheezy/sid Or Red Hat Enterprise can also be located with /etc/issue.net: cat /etc/issue.net With many variants, including OS X, you can also use uname to determine kernel extensions, etc: uname -a The thing I’ve learned about Linux is that there’s always a better way to do things. So feel free to comment on your better way or favorite variant!

March 5th, 2015

Posted In: Ubuntu, Unix

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Merry Christmas ya’ll!
On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me one 32 gig iPad On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me two bash one-liners On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me three Red Hat servers On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me four email blasts On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me five retweets On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me six regular expressions On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me seven lines of perl On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me eight app store apps On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me nine AWS instances On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me ten Active Directory forests On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me 11 crappy python scripts On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me 12 craft brews
xmas-ornament-computer-ram

December 25th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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RPM is a package manager available for most versions of Linux. The rpm command is used to install and uninstall software from the command line. Once software is installed, you can use the -q option to query for installed packages. The -a option shows all. So to see a list of all packages installed, use both: rpm -qa When you locate the name of a package you’d like to know more about, use the -i to get more information, along with the -q to query, followed by the name of the package: rpm -qi libcap This shows a list of all the files installed as part of the package.

September 19th, 2013

Posted In: Ubuntu, Unix

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Using CentOS or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5, install and run Wireshark over the command line.  To install Wireshark, use yum:
yum install wireshark
Run a capture:
tethereal -i eth1 -w ~/mycapture.pcap
This command will run a Wireshark capture on the eth1 interface and output the data to a file called mycapture.pcap in your home directory.  You can then view this file in the X11 interface for Wireshark or grep it for specific information.

April 14th, 2007

Posted In: Ubuntu, Unix

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