Tag Archives: reboot

Active Directory Windows Server

Rename a Windows 2012 Server Using PowerShell

When you are creating a bunch of Server 2012 Virtual Machines (or physical machines for that matter) it is helpful to programmatically change their names. To do so, use the Rename-Computer PowerShell cmdlet followed by the name you want the computer to have, as follows (assuming a name of 2012.krypted.com):

Rename-Computer 2012.krypted.com

Before you do anything else (e.g. bind to AD) you should then reboot the host, using the Restart-Computer cmdlet:

Restart-Computer

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Network Infrastructure

The Cumulus Command Line Interface

Cumulus comes with a number of commands installed in /usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server. The assets can be in a shared directory location, such as an NFS mount mapped to /cumulus or /Volumes/Cumulus. But in the /usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server directory there are a number of commands that can be pretty useful. For example, the stop-admin, stop-cumulus, start-cumulus and start-admin commands can be used to restart the Cumulus using a simple ARD template:

/usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server/stop-admin.sh
/usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server/stop-cumulus.sh
sleep 30
/usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server/start-cumulus.sh
/usr/local/Cumulus_Workgroup_Server/start-admin.sh

There are others, such as status.sh, which shows size of repository, PIDs, and the time running. The repair.sh can be used to repair the database and remove-admin.sh and remove-cumulus.sh can uninstall the admin console and cumulus servers respectively (danger, Will Robinson). The install-admin.sh and install-cumulus.sh scripts can also be used to install these items respectively. The bin directory contains daemons such as cumulusd and services information/cumulusrad.

If you want to work with assets, you’ll probably need the Java SE JDK to run and then query the Tomcat server. This web application environment leverages Cumulus Java classes to provide the API that can then be scripted into various workflows, such as providing a site that queries images in the DAM and displays those matching a given pattern on a website.

Overall, the scripting that can be done without the API is service control oriented, but with the API and a little SOAP you can pretty much grab or change almost anything you need to.

Mac OS X Mac Security

Core Dumps in Mac OS X

Every now and then, OS X has to drop some kids off at the pool. Usually it’s some developer that didn’t build a sanity check for every-single-possible-flippin’-thing-you-might-think-to-do-to-his/her-poor-flippin’-app-OMGYFI! And then, suddenly, out of nowhere, you get crap all over the system. Actually, as expected, Apple’s dumps are pretty well sequestered in the /cores directory. Each core file has a number appended behind it. For example, core.9901. When applications crash, they can save a lot of information about the state when they crashed into these files. For example, I have seen  cached passwords in there…

To disable core dumps, add the following line to /etc/sysctl.conf:

kern.coredump=0

After a restart core dumps will be disabled. You can also set the coredump setting to 0 to disable it live, using the sysctl command, but it will revert back to 1 at the next reboot:

sudo sysctl -w kern.coredump=0

Existing core files are removed using the following command:

sudo rm -f /cores/*

As core files actually serve a purpose, if an application or the system needs some good troubleshooting-foo, re-enable:

sudo sysctl -w kern.coredump=1

Football Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Time Machine

2012 Penn State MacAdmins Conference

Don’t let the theft of the Paternoville sign fool ya’, State College is as safe as ever. That is, until a bunch of Mac guys descend on the Nittany Lion Shrine. Yes, it’s that time of the year again when Mac guys from around the world (and yes, all of the speakers are male) descend upon Pennsylvania State University from throughout the Big 10 and beyond to discuss the Penn State mascot, the Nittany Lion. Actually, it’s a mountain lion, so we can’t discuss it quite yet at that point, but we can talk about a slightly bigger cat: Lion.

Lion deployment, scripted tools, Munki, InstaDMG, Puppet, migrations, “postPC,” PSU Blast, Dual Boot, NetBoot, reboot (just threw that in there because it sounded like it fit, but I’m sure much rebooting will be done anyway) and even iOS. Oh, and don’t forget lecture capture, launchd, monitoring, scripting, Boot Camp via BitTorrent (wait, what?), Damn Logs, Subversion (long live git), IPv6 (long live IPv4), DeployStudio (long live the French), Reposado (long live the mouse), Luggage, Casper (long live Minnesota!), ARD (long live the friggin’ App Store), troubleshooting, FileVault (long live Howard Hughes’ legacy), Tivoli (long live that 1984 video), Munki (crap, I already said that) and even iPad (which runs iOS I think).

Overall, the lineup is superb and looking at it, I am honored to be giving a session on Lion Server amidst all the cool stuff going on around me. I’m very impressed with the number and level of speakers and very excited to be a part of it. I’m also excited to be participating with Allister Banks, a cohort from 318, who will be giving talks on InstaDMG and Munki. Overall, it is sure to be a great conference and I look forward to hopefully seeing you all there if I don’t get arrested at the airport for wearing University of Minnesota socks.

Speaking of the Big 10. Did you know there are 12 teams in the Big 10? Did you know the Big East now has teams in Idaho and California? Did you know that the Big 12 has 10 teams? Did you know that the Pac 12 has 4 teams in 3 states that don’t touch the Pacific ocean? What does all this mean? No, it does not mean that we will discuss basic arithmetic and geography at the conference; however, we might show off some apps that can help the math professors at the member institutions of these higher education conferences teach these basic subjects a bit better. Disclaimer: I went to the University of Georgia and am required by having done so to poke fun at other conferences whenever it is possible. Having said that: how many Georgia programmers does it take to change a light bulb?


They can’t, it’s a hardware problem! OK, terrible joke. So here’s a picture of the Georgia mascot chomping down on an opposing (Auburn) player.

Seems like I’m going through football season withdrawals all of a sudden… Point of all this, go to the conference. It’s sure to be a hoot, and I’m sure there will be plenty of talk about football, er, I mean Mountain Lions, er, wait, I mean Mac OS X and iOS!