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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

macOS 10.13 brings changes to sysadminctl. You know those dscl scripts we used to use to create users? No longer supposed to be necessary (luckily they do still work). Now you can create a user with a one-liner, and do other forms of user management, such as enabling FileVault for a given user, or managing the guest accounts. However, you can’t do these tasks as root or via sudo. You have to do so with other admin accounts per Apple kbase HT208171 (in fact, this article has been in my queue waiting for that issue to be fixed – but keep in mind I’m not prefacing these with sudo in the below commands). In the below command, we’ll pass the -addUser option and then use -fullName to fill in the displayed name of the user, -password to send a password to the account and -hint so we can get a password hint into that attribute:

sysadminctl -addUser krypted2 -fullName "Charles Edge" -password testinguser -hint hi

The result would be as follows:

No clear text password or interactive option was specified (adduser, change/reset password will not allow user to use FDE) !
Creating user record…
Assigning UID: 503
Creating home directory at /Users/krypted2


Notice that in the above, the system automatically selected a home directory and UID. We could have passed those as well, using Now let’s use dscl to view the user we just created:

dscl . -read /Users/krypted2

Here’s a snippet of the dscl output:

NFSHomeDirectory: /Users/krypted2
Password: ********
Picture: /Library/User Pictures/Fun/Ying-Yang.png
PrimaryGroupID: 20
RealName: Charles Edge
RecordName: krypted2
RecordType: dsRecTypeStandard:Users
UniqueID: 503
UserShell: /bin/bash


Notice that the above is not the whole record you’d typically find with dscl. But if it were, you would not have the AuthenticationAuthority attribute. To see if it can unlock FileVault we can use the -secureTokenStatus operator built into sysadminctl. Simply pass the RecordName and you’ll get an indication if it’s on or off:

sysadminctl -secureTokenStatus krypted2

The response should be as follows:

Secure token is ENABLED for user Charles Edge

To just get the ENABLED response we’ll just use awk to grab that position (also note that we have to redirect stderr to stdout):

sysadminctl -secureTokenStatus charles.edge 2>&1 | awk '{print$7}'

We could append the AuthenticationAuthority attribute with dscl, as we would need a SecureToken. To get a SecureToken, we’ll use the -secureTokenOn verb:

sysadminctl -secureTokenOn krypted mysupersecretpassword

To disable, we’ll use -secureTokenOff

sysadminctl -secureTokenOff krypted mysupersecretpassword

Given that we like to rotate management passwords, we can do so using-resetPasswordFor which takes a username and a password as -newPassword and -passwordHint respectively:

sysadminctl -resetPasswordFor krypted -newPassword newsupersecretpassword -passwordHint "That was then this is now"

Note: In the above, we quoted the hint, which is supplied using the -passwordHint option. If it was one word we wouldn’t have needed to do so. 

Next, let’s check guest access. You can have guest enabled for logging in, afp, or smb. To check if guest is enabled for one of these use the -guestAccount, -afpGuestAccess, or -smbGuestAccess options. Each has an on, off, and status verb that can be used to manage that account type. So for example, if you wanted to check the status of the guest account, you could use -guestAccount as follows (also note that we have to redirect stderr to stdout):

sysadminctl -guestAccount status 2>&1 | awk '{print$5}'

To then disable if it isn’t already disabled:

sysadminctl -guestAccount Off

You can also use sysadminctl to do a quick check of the encryption state of the boot volume using the -filesystem option (although there’s no on and off verb for this option just yet):

bash-3.2# sysadminctl -filesystem status

2017-12-07 10:37:26.401 sysadminctl[8534:466661] Boot volume CS FDE: NO

2017-12-07 10:37:26.434 sysadminctl[8534:466661] Boot volume APFS FDE: YES

The help page is as follows:

Usage: sysadminctl [[interactive] || [-adminUser -adminPassword ]] -deleteUser [-secure || -keepHome] -newPassword -oldPassword [-passwordHint ] -resetPasswordFor -newPassword [-passwordHint ] -addUser [-fullName ] [-UID ] [-shell ] [-password ] [-hint ] [-home ] [-admin] [-picture ] -secureTokenStatus -secureTokenOn -password -secureTokenOff -password -guestAccount -afpGuestAccess -smbGuestAccess -automaticTime -filesystem status Pass '-' instead of password in commands above to request prompt.

Why should you switch to sysadminctl for scripts? Entitlements and I’m sure this is how mdmclient will pass management commands in the future… Why should you not? You can’t run most of it as root…

December 7th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , ,

Server comes with a command called RoomsAdminTool located at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/bin/RoomsAdminTool. This tool can list available rooms using a -l flag: RoomsAdminTool -l You can also create new rooms, using the following format, where krypted is the name of the room, the persistent option means the room is, er, persistent. The description option indicates a description used for the room. RoomsAdminTool -n krypted -c persistent yes description "This room is for friends of krypted only” To then delete the room, use the -d option: RoomsAdminTool -n krypted -d Add the -v to do it all verbosely. There are lots of other options as well, as follows (from the man page): Valid Configuration Keys and Values:
KEYVALID VALUESDESCRIPTION
descriptionstringA short description for the room
passwordstringDefine a password for room entry. An empty string implies no password required.
membersOnlyyes | noOnly room members are allowed to enter the room.
subjectLockedyes | noAre non-moderators and non-admins prevented from setting the room subject
logFormatDisabled | Text | XHTMLDisable room logging, or enable it using Text or XHTML.
maxUsersinteger; 0 for unlimitedSet the maximum allowed occupants for the room.
moderatedyes | no Make the room "moderated".
nonAnonymousyes | noIf "yes", only moderators/owners can discover occupants' real JIDs.
persistentyes | noPersistent rooms stay open until they are explicitly destroyed and their configuration survives service restarts, unlike non-persistent rooms.
privateMessagesAllowedyes | no Whether or not occupants can exchange private messages within the room.
roomPublicyes | no Defines whether the room be discovered by anyone
subjectstringSet a room subject/topic
usersCanInviteyes | no Defines whether occupants can invite other users to enter the room
addOwnervalid JabberIDMake the specified user a room owner (ex.: admin@krypted.com). Rooms can have multiple owners.
removeOwnervalid JabberIDRemove the specified user from the room owner list
addAdminvalid JabberIDMake the specified user a room admin
removeAdminvalid JabberIDRemove the specified user from the room admin list
addMembervalid JabberIDMake the specified user a room member
removeMembervalid JabberIDRemove the specified user from the room member list
addOutcastvalid JabberIDMake the specified user a room outcast (banned from public rooms)
removeOutcastvalid JabberIDRemove the specified user from the room outcast list
Ultimately, if you’d like to do Student Information System (SIS) integration, or wait for an AD/OD group and then programmatically generate rooms, this is how you’d do it.

November 7th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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There is a little tool in OS X called opendiff. This command can be used to bring up a quick and dirty graphical view of changes in a file. For example, if you run opendiff followed by two file names, you’ll see what’s different in the two files and what’s the same: opendiff test test1 The result then looks as follows. Screen Shot 2016-08-26 at 1.03.16 PM Note that in the above screenshot, a and b are in white lines and the others are grey, as those are consistent in the two files and the c has been removed and replaced with the four lines on the left. In larger files, this is pretty useful as it provides quick insight into what is different between two files, like what changed in a script between two different versions.

August 27th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Programming

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Posted a new swift command line tool to accept serial number data from an Apple device and respond with warranty information about a device at https://github.com/krypted/swiftwarrantylookup. This is based on pyMacWarranty, at https://github.com/pudquick/pyMacWarranty. Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 10.34.41 PM

March 16th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Swift

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,