krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Was interviewed by the most excellent guys from the Command Control Power podcast. Wetland everything from Bushel, to IBM, to Apple, to OS X Server, to Krypted, to Instagram nerdy and even a little reading It’s now available at http://commandcontrolpower.com/podcast/2015/9/12/117-charles-edge-of-jamf-software-and-kryptedcom-talks-about-the-response-to-bushel.

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I have tons of fun with these guys and look forward to getting a good excuse to hang out with them again! Maybe next time I’ll interview them!

September 17th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel, JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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May 31st, 2015

Posted In: Product Management

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You get requests for features. Lots of requests. What do you pick? Why? Sure, vote up, vote down, statistics, choosing people you respect, looking at potential new customers, and tons of other attributes go into this, but at the end of the day, there’s a judgement call. And some people hate what you pick. But sometimes, everyone is into it. Yup.

November 11th, 2014

Posted In: Product Management

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November 8th, 2014

Posted In: Product Management

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October 30th, 2014

Posted In: personal, Product Management

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d3u8k

October 15th, 2014

Posted In: personal, Product Management, public speaking

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I’m not going to lie to you, I’m a really crappy developer. And I have traditionally used OmniGraffle for prototyping web and mobile apps. But I recently found a cool little tool called Axure. The process of learning Azure was going pretty well. But there were a few things I couldn’t nail down exactly; so I got this handy little book called “Mobile Prototyping with Axure 7“.

Designing for mobile apps is different than web apps or even something like FileMaker, which is why prototyping instead of just building flat diagrams with a tool like OmniGraffle is so important. This book took me through Axure with an example-led, hands-on approach that basically did a lot of the work for me, allowing me to really quickly provide a team of developers with a vision of what something should look like and how it should behave. Especially since I’ve written a Packt book and am pretty familiar with the style and layout, it was a quick and easy read. And I realized I could do a few things with Axure I hadn’t even planned on doing when I bought the tool. Overall, great stuff and if you do a lot of prototyping, UX, product management or true design work, I couldn’t recommend it more.

The official description of the book:

Mobile app and website design are two of of the most popular areas of user experience design. Axure RP 7 allows you to design and build mobile prototypes and deploy them to real devices for testing and stakeholder review. It also allows you to create an interactive HTML website wireframe or UI mockup without coding. Axure 7 has new features such as new widget events, page events, adaptive views, and so on, that give you more flexibility while building mobile prototypes.

If you have experience with Axure but have never designed anything for mobile devices or responsive design, this book will get you started right away. This book contains working examples of how to complete some common mobile design tasks using Axure and focuses on creating rich, functional prototypes for mobiles, whether they are apps or websites.

Using this practical, example-oriented guide, you will learn how Axure RP 7 can be used by user experience designers to create and deploy mobile prototypes on smartphones and tablets.

You will also learn how Axure RP 7 can be used to create adaptive views for multi-device designs, sliding menus, mobile-friendly forms, drag and drop interactions, tool bars, and basic transitional animations common to mobile apps. You will get to know how to publish prototypes so that they can be tested or demonstrated on a real mobile device.

Anyway, love how you can get books on topics like this these days, so thought I’d share!

October 13th, 2014

Posted In: Product Management, Programming

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In technology, we often find a lot of cool stuff that, as developers, engineers and yes, even product managers, we think is just plain cool. In agile development, we create epics, where we lay out customer stories and tie them into a set of features; however, while we’re working towards our goals we often find those technical places where we discover we can do something super cool. And we sometimes want to weave those into our stories as features in products simply because we want to make stuff that we’re technically proud of. But should we?

Too often we don’t consider what the social ramifications are to features. Time and time again we hear stories of what seemed like a cool feature that got abused. When we’re creating software, we think of the art. We want to change the world after reading too much Guy Kawasaki. We want to build sometimes just for the sake of building. And sometimes we come to a place where we think we just have to add something into a product. Then we stop and think about it, and we come to a place where we’re just torn about whether that feature is something that should go back to the obscure place we found it. And in times like that, when we’re torn about what to do, we have to remember that “we are the goodpeople” and do what’s right.

That is all.

September 30th, 2014

Posted In: cloud, personal, Product Management

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May 27th, 2014

Posted In: Product Management

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May 21st, 2014

Posted In: personal

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