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macOS Server 5.2 (for Sierra)  comes with the /usr/sbin/serverinfo command (introduced in Mountain Lion Server). The serverinfo command is useful when programmatically obtaining information about the very basic state of an Apple Server.

The first option indicates whether the Server app has been downloaded from the app store, which is the –software option:

serverinfo --software

When used, this option reports the following if the Server.app can be found:

This system has server software installed.

Or if the software cannot be found, the following is indicated:

This system does NOT have server software installed.

The –productname option determines the name of the software app:

serverinfo --productname

If you change the name of the app from Server then the server info command won’t work any longer, so the output should always be the following:

Server

The –shortversion command returns the version of the Server app being used:

serverinfo --shortversion

The output will not indicate a build number, but instead the version of the app on the computer the command is run on:

5.2

To see the build number (which should iterate with each update to the Server app from the Mac App Store, use the –buildversion option:

serverinfo --buildversion

The output shows the build of server, which doesn’t necessarily match the OS X build number:

16S1195

Just because the Server app has been downloaded doesn’t mean the Server setup assistant has been run. To see if it has, use the –configured option:

serverinfo --configured

The output indicates whether the system is running as a server or just has the app installed (e.g. if you’re using it to connect to another server:

This system has server software configured.

You can also output all of the information into a single, easy to script against property list using the –plist option:

serverinfo --plist

The output is a list of each of the other options used:

<?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”UTF-8″?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC “-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN” “http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd”>
<plist version=”1.0″>
<dict>
<key>IsOSXServerVolume</key>
<true/>
<key>IsOSXServerVolumeConfigured</key>
<true/>
<key>IsServerHardware</key>
<false/>
<key>LocalizedServerProductName</key>
<string>Server</string>
<key>MinimumServerVersionAllowed</key>
<string>5.0.19</string>
<key>ServerBuildVersion</key>
<string>16S1195</string>
<key>ServerPerformanceModeEnabled</key>
<false/>
<key>ServerVersion</key>
<string>5.2</string>
</dict>
</plist>

The Server Root can reside in a number of places. To see the path (useful when scripting commands that are relative to the ServerRoot:

serverinfo –prefix

By default, the output is as follows, which is basically like a dirname of the ServerRoot:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot

You can also see whether the system is running on actual hardware desgnated by Apple for servers using the –hardware option:

serverinfo --hardware

The output simply indicates if the hardware shipped with OS X Server on it from Apple:

This system is NOT running on server hardware.

The –perfmode option indicates whether or not the performance mode has been enabled, dedicating resources to binaries within the Server app:

serverinfo --perfmode

If the performance mode has not been enabled then the output will be as such:

Server performance mode is NOT enabled.

To enable performance mode, you can also use serverinfo. This is the only task that the command does that can make any changes to the system and as such is the only time you need to elevate privileges:

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 1

Note: This isn’t really working for me right now, but I filed a radar and guessing it will shortly.

Or set the boolean value back to 0 to disable.

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 0

Note: This isn’t really working for me right now, but I filed a radar and guessing it will shortly.

October 2nd, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

OS X Mavericks Server (Server 3) comes with the /usr/sbin/serverinfo command (introduced in Mountain Lion Server). The serverinfo command is useful when programmatically obtaining information about the very basic state of an Apple Server.

The first option indicates whether the Server app has been downloaded from the app store, which is the –software option:

serverinfo --software

When used, this option reports the following if the Server.app can be found:

This system has server software installed.

Or if the software cannot be found, the following is indicated:

This system does NOT have server software installed.

The –productname option determines the name of the software app:

serverinfo --productname

If you change the name of the app from Server then the server info command won’t work any longer, so the output should always be the following:

Server

The –shortversion command returns the version of the Server app being used:

serverinfo --shortversion

The output will not indicate a build number, but instead the version of the app on the computer the command is run on:

2.2.67

To see the build number (which should iterate with each update to the Server app from the Mac App Store, use the –buildversion option:

serverinfo --buildversion

The output shows the build of server, which doesn’t necessarily match the OS X build number:

13S411

Just because the Server app has been downloaded doesn’t mean the Server setup assistant has been run. To see if it has, use the –configured option:

serverinfo --configured

The output indicates whether the system is running as a server or just has the app installed (e.g. if you’re using it to connect to another server:

This system has server software configured.

You can also output all of the information into a single, easy to script against property list using the –plist option:

serverinfo --plist

The output is a list of each of the other options used:



IsOSXServerVolume IsOSXServerVolumeConfigured IsServerHardware

LocalizedServerProductName
Server
ServerBuildVersion
13S411
ServerPerformanceModeEnabled

ServerVersion
2.2.67

The Server Root can reside in a number of places. To see the path (useful when scripting commands that are relative to the ServerRoot:

serverinfo –prefix

By default, the output is as follows, which is basically like a dirname of the ServerRoot:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot

You can also see whether the system is running on actual hardware desgnated by Apple for servers using the –hardware option:

serverinfo --hardware

The output simply indicates if the hardware shipped with OS X Server on it from Apple:

This system is NOT running on server hardware.

The –perfmode option indicates whether or not the performance mode has been enabled, dedicating resources to binaries within the Server app:

serverinfo --perfmode

If the performance mode has not been enabled then the output will be as such:

Server performance mode is NOT enabled.

To enable performance mode, you can also use serverinfo. This is the only task that the command does that can make any changes to the system and as such is the only time you need to elevate privileges:

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 1

Or set the boolean value back to 0 to disable.

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 0

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The traditional way to enable Apple Remote Desktop is using the kickstart command. But there’s a simpler way in OS X Mountain Lion Server. To do so, use the serveradmin command.

To enable ARD using the serveradmin command, use the settings option, with info:enableARD to set the payload to yes:

sudo serveradmin settings info:enableARD = yes

Once run, open System Preferences and click on Sharing. The Remote Management box is then checked and the local administrative user has access to ARD into the host.

The Server app will also have the “Enable screen sharing and remote management” option checked.

There are also a few other commands that can be used to control settings. To enable SSH for administrators:

sudo serveradmin settings info:enableSSH = yes

To enable SNMP:

sudo serveradmin settings info:enableSNMP = yes

To enable the dedication of resources to Server apps (aka Server Performance Mode):

sudo serveradmin settings info:enableServerPerformanceMode = yes

August 14th, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,