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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Automating OS installations is going to eventually be about as easy on macOS as it is in iOS (er, if you have MDM that is). But in the meantime, it’s getting a bit more challenging. The obvious way Apple would prefer this to happen these days is via the startosinstall command that first shipped with El Capitan and with brtool getting moved around all the time, and becoming less of a thing, there’s one quick and easy thing you can do: sudo "/Applications/Install macOS Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall" --applicationpath "/Applications/Install macOS Sierra.app" --agreetolicense --nointeraction --volume /Volumes/Macintosh\ HD In the above command, we’ve dropped “Install macOS Sierra.app” on a machine. While you’d guess that it would find the application path based on its own surname, we went ahead and supplied it as that seems to basically be a thing. Basically, –agreetolicense keeps us from having to run some expect scripts to accept a license agreement, –nointeraction suppresses as many of the screens as possible, and –volume allows us to install to any volume we’d like. This isn’t fully automated, but I have been able to layer in some more logic to quit apps before the script fires and then expect out other items from the script to automate a restart, watching for osinstallersetupd as a key. This is all a bit bulkier than just using something like createOSXinstallPkg but it’s important to mention that there are a number of system components that are allowed for in SIP that use osinstallersetupd and so this blessed mechanism is likely the future until you can trigger an OS upgrade (and update I suppose) using an MDM command.

October 23rd, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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Time is a very important aspect of OS X Server, as it has been since the early days. Time is so important that if you see network time server, NTP or 5 minutes as the answer on an Apple exam, you should just pick that one, as it’s invariably correct. The traditional way to configure time zones and Network Time Servers is to use systemsetup command. Before you set a time zone, run the following to see a list of all available time zones, use the -listtimezones option in systemsetup: sudo systemsetup -listtimezones To set the time zone, pick one and use the -settimezone option in systemsetup: sudo systemsetup -settimezone "America/Chicago" To check the current time, then run -gettime: sudo systemsetup -gettime The -settime option can then be used to set the time, although it’s invariably better to set the time zone automatically with a network time protocol (NTP) server, using the -setnetworktimeserver option: sudo systemsetup -setnetworktimeserver time.krypted.com You would then need to turn using NTP servers on, using -setusingnetworktime option and setting the value there to on sudo systemsetup -setusingnetworktime on Now let’s look at a different way to do this. Run the following, in OS X Server: sudo serveradmin settings info:timeZone = "America/New_York" That shouldn’t work. Now ya’ know, OS X Server isn’t fully matured yet, so they’ll get around to it… But what does work is setting the NTP server and enabling NTP services. To enable NTP: sudo serveradmin settings info:ntpTimeServe = yes To set the NTP server: info:ntpServerName = "time.krypted.com" Note: The NTP server must be accessible when set.

August 18th, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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