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Hey look, there’s a new category on the Jamf Marketplace, available at https://marketplace.jamf.com/apps/#category=AppConfig,selecting the AppConfig category. The new AppConfig category gives administrators of any MDM that supports AppConfig access to a set of apps that support AppConfig. If you have an app that isn’t listed here, feel free to let me know. 

What does this mean? Well, AppConfig is a way of sending data into an app. App config allows a customer to deploy settings into applications on iOS devices in much the same way that settings can be sent into a Mac app via the defaults command. This means an end user could get an app installed on their device from the iOS App Store, a custom app, or a B2B app and that app would have any settings the user might need to connect to servers or configure the experience.

So what is Managed App Config? At it’s most basic, you identify a label and a value in XML and send it to an iOS device that’s running iOS 7 or later (e.g. via Jamf 9 and up). The vendor who makes the app has to basically define what those settings are. Which brings up an interesting problem never fully addressed with defaults domains: standardization and ease-of-use (although MCX was close). 


AppConfig.org  is a consortium of MDM vendors and software vendors that maintain the emerging AppConfig standards around Managed App Config (within the confines of what Apple gives vendors) and then makes a feed of settings for apps that conform to those standards. Jamf is a founding member of Appconfig.org, along with MobileIron and AirWatch. Examples of what you could put into the AppConfig.org feed include 
  • Enabling certain features of apps
  • Server URLs
  • Logos (if they’re pulled dynamically)
  • Text labels
  • Language packs

To see a list of apps that are available, check out http://www.appconfig.org. 

Managed App Config options are set by vendors at compile time within the code and then the XML sent with the app is parsed by the app at installation time. If you’re a software vendor who wants to get started with AppConfig, check out the Spec Creator from Jamf Research or get in touch with the developer relations team from any MDM vendor.

If you’re a customer of an app and would like to leverage Managed App Config and your vendor isn’t listed on the appconfig.org site, get in touch with them, as this is the future of app management and chances are that you won’t be the only organization looking to unlock this type of feature. 

Let’s look at how this actually works. The Managed App Config options per supported app are available on a feed. The feed is available at http://d2e3kgnhdeg083.cloudfront.net. Here, as follows, you’ll see a list of all of the apps supported.


You can then copy the path for an app, such as com.adobe.Adobe-Reaser/1/appconfig.xml and append it to the end of the URL to get the feed for that specific app. You can test this using http://d2e3kgnhdeg083.cloudfront.net/com.adobe.Adobe-Reader/1/appconfig.xml to see output as follows.


Here, note that most of these fields are key value pairs defined by Adobe (in this example at least). You can enable or disable features of Adobe Reader using these keys. The same is true with a tool like Box that might want a more granular collection of settings than a feature like Managed Open In. 

Once you have the XML, you can then copy it to the clipboard and paste it into the App Configuration tab of an app, as follows. 

Finally, Apple has sample code available at https://developer.apple.com/library/content/samplecode/sc2279/Introduction/Intro.html

March 13th, 2018

Posted In: iPhone, JAMF

Tags: , , , , , , ,

When building an MDM, you look for a lot of workflows to make the lives of end users easier. One of those is Managed App Config, which is a technology from Apple that allows an MDM to inject information into an app when the app is sent to a device. Because all apps are different, it’s up to the application developer to build in support both for the feature itself, as well as for any variables they’d like to make possible for an MDM to send to an app. For example, an app might make server and username available, so that when a user opens the app, they need only provide their password. Or based on an Active Directory group, you might have a location within the app to direct a user to, a different server, or even a different schema for the username. This is the simplest example, but there are hundreds of other things I wanted to do. And app vendors were actually very open to building these features. But they all asked “OK, so what do I do.” And the last thing I wanted to tell them was to use up some cockamamie naming convention that I made up off the top of my head. So, much smarter people than I have come up with all the conventions to help standardize this otherwise chaotic awesomeness. And they’ve created a website, with IBM, JAMF, MobileIron, and AirWatch as the founding members for, and published best practices. From the site:
A community focused on providing tools and best practices around native capabilities in mobile operating systems to enable a more consistent, open and simple way to configure and secure mobile apps in order to increase mobile adoption in business. Users benefit with instant mobile productivity and a seamless out-of-the box experience, and businesses benefit with secure work-ready apps with minimal setup required while leveraging existing investments in Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM), VPN, and identity solutions. Ultimately, your apps are simpler to configure, secure and deploy.
To learn more about standardizing Managed App Config, check out the AppConfig Community Site. Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 9.29.02 AM This goes a long way in making one of the coolest features for MDM much, much more useable. Hope you enjoy!

February 28th, 2016

Posted In: iPhone, JAMF, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , ,