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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

I have a new article for Thrive Global (another Arianna Huffington property) available at Thrive Global. This one is on “Tools and best practices on monitoring and teaching your kids responsible mobile device use.” It starts out like this:
My world changed when I awoke one day to find my 4-year-old daughter with a tablet in her hands, watching Transformers. The sight unleashed a handful of worries I hadn’t before experienced. Prior to that morning, I knew her to be fan of Star Wars figures, Legos and stuffed animals. And while I wasn’t displeased by her choice to watch a Michael Bay movie, I did start thinking about what else she could access on the device.
Click here to read more…
Screenshot of "Embracing (and managing) tech for your iGen child"

March 11th, 2018

Posted In: iPhone

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There’s a great website at https://macosxautomation.com that provides a lot of information on using Automator to build automations for the Mac. When you build automations, you can run them by double-clicking on apps or workflows. You can also invoke them with the automator command.

The automator command can, surprisingly, be used to run automator workflows. I know, it’s crazy. Located at /usr/bin/automator the automator command can be used to fire up workflows. In its most basic incantation, you can invoke a workflow without much fuss. Here, I’ll use a workflow that just fires up a specific screensaver:

/usr/bin/automator ~/Desktop/screensaver.workflow

In addition, you can run workflows in verbose mode for simple troubleshooting using -v:

/usr/bin/automator ~/Desktop/screensaver.workflow

Which shows you each thing that happens in a step-by-step:

Starting Automator…
Start Screen Saver is running
Start Screen Saver is finished
The Automator workflow has completed.

You can also send input into a workflow using -I and you can use -D to set multiple variables with values, which I’ll cover in a later article.

February 27th, 2018

Posted In: Mac OS X

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Been working on a new plugin to embed device details from Jamf Pro into Jira Service Desk. It looks a little like this:


To access the plugin, see the links below.

https://github.com/krypted/Jira-Device-Lookups-in-Jamf

February 13th, 2018

Posted In: JAMF

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Autopkgr is basically a small app that allows you to select some repositories of recipes and then watch and run them when they update. It’s a 5 minute or less installation, and at its simplest will put software packages into a folder of your choosing so you can test/upload/scope to users. Or you can integrate it with 3rd party tools like Munki, FileWave, or Jamf using the JSSImporter. Then if you exceed what it can do you can also dig under the hood and use Autopkg itself. It’s an app, and so it needs to run on a Mac. Preferably one that doesn’t do much else. 


Installing Autopkgr

You can obtain the latest release of Autopkgr at https://github.com/lindegroup/autopkgr. To install, drag the app to the Applications folder. 

When you open AutoPkgr for the first time, you’ll prompted for the user name and password to install the helper tool (think menu item). 

The menu item then looks like the following.

These are the most common tasks that administrators would run routinely. They involve checking Autopkg recipes to see if there are new versions of supported software titles, primarily. Opening the Autopkgr app once installed, though, shows us much more. Let’s go through this screen-by-screen in the following sections.


Moving AutoPkg Folders Around 

By default, when installed with Autopkgr, Autopkg stores its cache in ~/Library/AutoPkg/Cache and the repos are sync’d to ~/Library/AutoPkg/RecipeRepos. You can move these using the Choose… button in the Folders & Integration tab of Autopkgr, although it’s not necessary (unless, for example, you need to move the folders to another volume). 

Note: You can also click on the Configure AutoPkg button to add proxies, pre/post processing scripts, and GitHub tokens if needed. 


Keeping Autopkg and Git up-to-date

The Install tab is used to configure AutoPkg settings. If there is a new version of AutoPkg and Git, you’ll see an Install button for each (used to obtain the latest and greatest scripts); otherwise you’ll see a green button indicating it’s up-to-date. 

You can also configure AutoPkgr to be in your startup items by choosing to have it be available at login, and show/hide the Autopkgr menu item and Dock item. 


Configuring Repositories and Recipes

Repositories are where collections of recipes live. Recipes are how they’re built. Think of a recipe as a script that checks for a software update and then follows a known-good way of building that package. Recipes can then be shared (via GitHub) and consumed en masse. 

To configure a repository, click on the “Repos & Recipes” tab in Autopkgr. Then select the repos to use (they are sorted by stars so the most popular appear first). 

Note: There are specific recipes for Jamf Pro at https://github.com/autopkg/jss-recipes.git.

Then you’ll see a list of the recipes (which again, will make packages) that AutoPkgr has access to. Check the ones you want to build and click on the Run Recipes Now. 

If you don’t see a recipe for a title you need, use the search box at the bottom of the screen. That would show you a given entry for any repos that you’ve added. Again, all of the sharing of these repos typically happens through GitHub, but you can add any git url (e.g. if you wanted a repo of recipes in your organization. 

Once you’ve checked the boxes for all the recipes you want to automate, you can then use the “Run AutoPkg Now” option in the menu items to build, or rely on a routine run, as described in the next section.


Scheduling Routine Builds

Autopkgr can schedule a routine run to check recipes. This is often done at night after administrators leave the office. To configure, click on the schedule tab and then check the box for Enable scheduled AutoPkg runs. You can also choose to update your recipes from the repos by checking the “Update all recipes before each AutoPkg run” checkbox.


Getting Notified About New Updates To Packages

I know this sounds crazy. But people like to get notified when there’s a new thing showing up. To configure a variety of notification mechanisms, click on the Notifications tab in AutoPkgr.

Here, you can configure alerts via email, Slack, HipChat, macOS Notification Center, or via custom webhooks.


Integrating Autopkg with Jamf (and other supported vendors)

When integrating with another tool, you’ll need to first install the integration. To configure the JSSImporter, we’ll open the “Folders & Integrations” tab in Autopkgr and then click on the Install JSSImporter button.

Once installed, configure the URL, username and password (for Customer API access) and configure any distribution points that need to have the resultant packages copied to. 


Once the JSSImporter is configured, software should show up in Jamf Pro scoped to a new group upon each build.  It is then up to the Jamf Administrator to complete the scoping tasks so software shows up on end user devices.


What the JSSImporter Does from Autopkg

This option doesn’t seem to work at this time. Using the following may make it work:

sudo easy_install pip && pip install -I --user pyopenssl

Note: The above command may error if you’re using macOS Server. If so, call easy_install directly via 

/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/Extras/lib/python/easy_install.py.

February 9th, 2018

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , ,

This New Years Day, Learn The Jot Command The jot command is one I haven’t used in awhile. But it’s still useful. Let’s take a look at a few of the things you can do with it. First, let’s just print lines into a new file called “century.txt” which we can do by running with the number of increments followed by the starting number, and then redirecting the output into the file name:

jot 100 1 > ~/Desktop/century.txt

Or to do integers instead, simply put the decimals:

jot 100 1.00 > ~/Desktop/century.txt

Or in descending order,

jot – 100 1 > ~/Desktop/century.txt

Now we could change the output to be just 50 to 100, by incrementing 50 (the first position) and starting at 50 (the second):

jot 50 50

The jot command is able to print sequential data, as we’ve seen. But we can also print random data, using the -r option. Following that option we have three important positions, the first is the number of iterations, but the next two are the lower and upper boundaries for the numbers, respectively. So in the below command we’ll grab 10 iterations (or ten random numbers) that are between 1 and 1000:

jot -r 10 1 1000

Now if we were to add a -c in there and use a and z as the upper and lower bounds, we’d get… letters (this time we’re just gonna’ ask for one letter)!

jot -r -c 1 a z

Something I find useful is just to shove random data into a file infinitely. And by useful I mean hopefully not left running overnight on my own computer (been there, done that). To do this, just use a 0 for the number of iterations:

jot -r -c 0

Something that is actually useful is the basic ASCII set:

jot -c 128 0

We can also append data to a word using -w. So let’s say we want to print the characters aa followed by a through z. In the below we’ll define that with -w and then we’ll list those two characters followed by %c which is where the character substitution goes and then the number of iterations followed by the lower bound:

jot -w aa%c 26 a

You can also do stuttering sequences, useful for the occasional tango dancer, so here we’ll do a 5/3 countdown:

jot – 100 0 -.5

Or we could create a one meg file by creating 1,024 bytes:

jot -b 0 1024 > onemegfile.txt

Oh wait, that file’s two megs. Get it? 😉

And running strings teaches you that you can’t bound random (a good lesson for the New Year). Anything you use jot for?

Happy New Years!

January 1st, 2018

Posted In: bash, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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December 29th, 2017

Posted In: MacAdmins Podcast

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December 9th, 2017

Posted In: MacAdmins Podcast

Tags: ,

November 19th, 2017

Posted In: JAMF, MacAdmins Podcast

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I’d written an efi version checker. But the lovely Andrew Seago texted me one that’s better than mine. So I present it here: current_efi_version=`/usr/libexec/efiupdater | grep "Raw" | cut -d ':' -f2 | sed 's/ //'`
echo "current_efi_version $current_efi_version"
latest_efi_version=`ls -La /usr/libexec/firmwarecheckers/eficheck/EFIAllowListShipping.bundle/allowlists/ | grep "$current_efi_version"`
echo "latest_efi_version $latest_efi_version"
if [ "$latest_efi_version" == "" ]; then
echo "EFI FAILED"
exit 1
else
echo "EFI PASSED"
exit 0
fi

November 2nd, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Uncategorized

Tags: , , ,

A bootable installer is one of the fastest ways to install a Mac. Rather than copy the installer to a local drive you can run it right off a USB disk (or Thunderbolt if you dare). Such a little USB drive would be similar to the sticks that came with the older MacBook Air, when we were all still sitting around wondering how you would ever install the OS on a computer with no optical media or Ethernet otherwise. Luckily, Apple loves us. To make a bootable USB/flash drive of High Sierra like the one that used to come with the MacBook Air, first name the USB drive. I’ll use hsinstall for the purposes of this article. The format should be Mac OS Extended Journaled, although the new system drive will be apfs on the target volume. The installer is called Install macOS Sierra and is by default located in the /Applications directory. Inside the app bundle, there’s a new binary called createinstallmedia (nested in Contents/Resources). Using this binary you can create an installation drive (similar to what we used to do with InstallESD). To do so, specify the –volume to create the drive on (note that the target volume will be erased), the path of the “Install macOS High Sierra” app bundle and then we’re going to select –nointeraction so it just runs through the whole thing

/Applications/Install\ macOS\High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/hsinstall --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app --nointeraction

Note: You’ll need to elevate your privileges for this to run.

Once run you’ll see that it erases the disk, copies the Installation materials (InstallESX, etc) and then makes the drive bootable, as follows:

Erasing Disk: 0%... 10%... 20%... 100%... Copying installer files to disk... Copy complete. Making disk bootable... Copying boot files... Copy complete.

Then you can either select the new volume in the Startup Disk System Preference pane or boot the computer holding down the option key to select the new volume.

Note: If you can do this on a system with a solid state drive it will be  faster. Although this took 17 minutes last I ran it even then so be patient for the files to copy.

September 28th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X

Tags: , , , ,

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