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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The codesign command is used to sign apps and check the signature of apps. Apps need to be signed more and more and more these days. So, you might need to loop through your apps and verify that they’re signed. You might also choose to stop trusting given signing authorities if one is compromised. To check signing authorities, you can use

codesign -dv --verbose=4 /Applications/Firefox.app/ 2>&1 | sed -n '/Authority/p'

The options in the above command:

  • -d is used to display information about the app (as opposed to a -s which would actually sign the app)
  • -v increases the verbosity level (without the v’s we won’t see the signing “Authority”)
  • –verbose=4 indicates the level of verbosity
  • 2>&1 redirects stderr to stdout
  • /Applications/Firefox.app/ – the path to the app we’re checking (or signing if you’re signing)

Then we pipe the output into a simple sed and get the signing chain. Or don’t. For example, if you’re scripting don’t forget a sanity check for whether an object isn’t signed. For example, if we just run the following for a non-signed app:

codesign -dv --verbose=4 /Applications/Utilities/XQuartz.app/

The output would be as follows:

/Applications/Utilities/XQuartz.app/: code object is not signed at all

January 12th, 2017

Posted In: Apps, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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Prepare for your network administrators to cringe… I’ve spoken on these commands but never really put them together in this way, exactly. So I wanted to find a coworker on a network. So one way to find people is to use a ping sweep. Here I’m going to royally piss off my switch admins and ping sweep the subnet:

ping 255.255.255.255

Next, I’m going to run arp to translate:

arp -a

Finally, if a machine is ipv6, it wouldn’t show up. So I’m going to run:

ndp -a

Now, I find the hostname, then look at the MAC address, copy that to my clipboard, find for that to get the IP and then I can flood that host with all the things. Or you could use nmap… :-/

January 7th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Network Infrastructure

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macOS has keychains. Sometimes they’re a thing. When they are you might want to delete them. Let’s say you have an admin account. You want to keep the keychains for that account, but remove all the others. For this, you could do a shell operator to extglob. Or you could do a quick while loop as follows:

ls /Users | grep -v "admin" | while read USERNAME do; rm -Rf "/Users/$USERNAME/Library/Keychains/*" done;

If you borrow this, be careful.

December 1st, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security

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November 29th, 2016

Posted In: MacAdmins Podcast

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November 22nd, 2016

Posted In: JAMF, MacAdmins Podcast

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The MacAD.UK (aka macaduck) is coming up in February. The schedule and lineups are coming together nicely and I really like the sessions that have been announced thus far (turns out our friends at Amsys have their finger on the pulse!). Soooo, you should join us! And for a limited time, you can join us at a sweet, sweet discounted price! The code is 2017sp10 and is valid for a 10% discount! Sign up at http://www.macad.uk.

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November 19th, 2016

Posted In: public speaking

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You work for weeks, months, or years to build a business that is killing it. Then you get a huge new customer. You feel like you’ve been put on the map. But then the reality sets in. Maybe you won the business because you’re innovative, less expensive, faster, etc. But now you start getting completely destroyed by the overhead of making those sweet, sweet dollars from that new customer. Wouldn’t it have been great to have known about a few things to ask about? My response includes a few tips on how to work with them, that just might save you some serious margin!. Check it out at http://www.inc.com/charles-edge/how-to-work-with-big-companies-without-getting-caught-in-red-tape.html.

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November 18th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books

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OK, I don’t talk politics, about personal stuff, etc on this site usually. And I’m not gonna’ start now. But with Give To The Max Day in Minnesota today, I did write an article on the meaning of Compassion on Huffington Post. It can be found at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/charles-edge/what-does-compassion-mean_b_12999974.html if you’re interested in such things; if not, hope you have a wonderful day!

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November 17th, 2016

Posted In: Tamarisk

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I thought there might be an easier way to do this. So there’s this binary called serverrails that I assumed would install rails – no wait, actually it’s a ruby script that tells me to ‘gem install rails’ – which fails:

cat `which serverrails`
#!/usr/bin/ruby
# Stub rails command to load rails from Gems or print an error if not installed.
require 'rubygems'

version = ">= 0"
if ARGV.first =~ /^_(.*)_$/ and Gem::Version.correct? $1 then
version = $1
ARGV.shift
end

begin
gem 'railties', version or raise
rescue Exception
puts 'Rails is not currently installed on this system. To get the latest version, simply type:'
puts
puts ' $ sudo gem install rails'
puts
puts 'You can then rerun your "rails" command.'
exit 0
end

load Gem.bin_path('railties', 'rails', version)

Given that doesn’t work, we can just do this the old fashioned way… First let’s update rails to 2.2 or 2.2.4 using rvm, so grab the latest rvm and install it into /usr/local/rvm:

sudo curl -sSL https://get.rvm.io | bash -s stable --ruby

Then fire it up:

sudo source /etc/profile.d/rvm.sh

Then install the latest ruby:

sudo rvm install 2.2

Set it as default:

sudo rvm use 2.2 –default

Then run your gem install:

gem install rails

#thingsthatshouldbeautomatedandoddlyarenot

November 14th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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Recently, I got a strange message when trying to run a command:

You have exceeded the maximum number of shell sessions.

I’d seen a series of commands but never really needed to use them, so I ran:

shell_session_delete_expired

And viola, life was good. My command run. Of course, the next time I went to close the terminal correctly using the exit command. Upon doing so, I noticed:

logout
Saving session…
…copying shared history…
…saving history…truncating history files…
…completed.

[Process completed]

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So, I opened a new shell and ran:

shell_session_update

And go the same result. Same with:

shell_session_save

Fun.

November 8th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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