Tag Archives: MAC

Apple Watch

Take A Screenshot On Apple Watch

Just like with an iPhone, it’s simple to take a screenshot on your Apple Watch. It’s a similar process as on other Apple devices. To take a screenshot from an Apple Watch, go to the screen to take a screen capture of and then press and hold the digital crown (the round button that spins) while you press the side button down (the little button below the digital crown).

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The screen will flash for just a second and you’ll hear the camera sound. If you wait a couple of minutes, the screenshot will automatically show up on your phone in the photo library.

Mac OS X Ubuntu Unix WordPress

Resolve InnoDB Errors In MySQL

Database won’t start? InnoDB errors are a pain. Where was krypted for a month? Did everything finally get to me and I gave up blogging? No, the site ended up having some problems with corruption in some rows of the InnoDB tables. But, I was able to get the site back up by putting the database into recovery mode. How did I do this? It’s pretty straight forward. Open my.cnf and paste these lines in there:

innodb_force_recovery=3
innodb_purge_threads=0

Once the corruption is resolved, bring up empty databases and import your mysqldump into the new databases and link your site back up. But, the InnoDB force recovery puts the database into recovery mode, which is read only. So I wasn’t actually able to use the site, just look at it. At least the content was available, right? When MySQL isn’t writeable, you can’t log in as an admin, etc. The rest is one of the bigger pains I’ve encountered that didn’t result in an all nighter at a customer. I’ll write that up when I have time some day. In the meantime, next time someone changes my root password and breaks my backup scripts so I can’t just bring in a mysqldump, I’m breaking their arms. You’ve been warned.

Apple Watch

Apple Watch Vs. Pebble DeathMatch (Comparison)

When I started to write this, I had this idea that I’d write an article that looked at the features and the usability of the Pebble and those of the Apple Watch. Both have the ability to load custom apps, both have app stores, both do many of the same other tasks, etc.

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The problem with that premise for this article is that they simply aren’t even remotely comparable. Let’s look at why:

  • Apps: The Apple Watch can support apps and glances from apps. You can load as many as the thing can take, you can get different types of apps and there are already hundreds (if not thousands – I don’t have the patience to count) of apps that have support for the Apple Watch. The Pebble on the other hand is limited to 8 concurrent apps and I have never actually found more than 5 that I wanted to use that didn’t involve a watch face.
  • Watch faces: I don’t change watch faces really. Most of the apps on a Pebble are all about custom watch faces. Pick your favorite school, your favorite Disney character, etc. The watch faces available for the Apple Watch are great and all, but the default face, with instant access to the calendar, your exercise stats, the weather, and of course the time, are is really what the device is about and the best usability option, something Apple has always excelled at. It would be great if the other time zone option on the Apple Watch had some really cool stuff you could swap it out with. If you force tap on the screen, you can certainly select other things, but all the cool stuff is placed in other areas of the default watch face.
  • The screen: The screen on the Apple Watch is just a beautiful screen, with full color, lots of pixels, etc. The screen on the Pebble more closely resembles options from an Atari 2600. So, think Wii vs 2600 (aka e-paper)…
  • The app that manages the wearable: The Apple Watch app has in app controls for what’s available on phones, can configure which apps/glances are shown, unpair/re-pair, configure notifications, manage Do Not Disturb, put the device into Do Not Disturb mode, configure passcodes, manage sounds and vibrations, configure brightness and size. It’s pretty robust. The app for the Pebble does much less, but is on par given the features available on the device in general.
  • Light: The type of light emitted by the Pebble actually makes it a little easier to see in sunlight to me. But if you have sunglasses on then forget about it. Which I usually do when there’s a lot of sunlight. But this is a showstopper for some. Like those who (legitimately) still look for raised keyboards on phones…
  • Battery life: The Pebble kicks the crap out the Apple Watch when it comes to battery life. I’ve not charged my Pebble once in a week and it was happily camping straight into the next week. My Apple Watch must be charged daily.
  • Older iPhones: The Pebble can work on any iOS 6 compatible device (and up). The Apple Watch needs an iOS 8 device. So if you have an older phone, you’ll likely want a Pebble. Or take this as the opportunity to stop listening to 90s era Brittany Spears and upgrade your phone when you buy a watch.
  • App security: There are apps that can muck up a Pebble. This ranges from screen distortion to apps crashing. I tend to think that if an app can cause a device to crash then it could be intentionally designed to do more worser (yes, that was on purpose) things to the device as well. I could be wrong and haven’t spent any real time doing security research on the device, but it seems like a bad thing. Meanwhile, apps that go to an Apple Watch go through the App Store and so have at least some semblance of review.
  • Music Control: I like the Pebble more in this respect. It instantly sends commands to music on your phone. The Apple Watch always seems to be just a little bit delayed (not bad, but I can notice the delay). Having said that, the Apple Watch also has a Remote app, so you can also control music streaming out of computers onto Apple TVs.
  • Instant Messaging: The Pebble can show you messages. The Apple Watch can as well, but goes a step or 10 further and actually allows you to send voice messages, text messages, animated Emoji and even your heartbeat (which people keep creepily sending me – except that one guy who has none – but we all knew he was a lich so whatever on that).
  • Fitness: The fitness options on the Pebble are mostly from apps. The apps are a bit limited, but you can do a few pretty cool things. There are more built-in options on the Apple Watch; however, the 3rd party apps for Fitness tracking are pretty considerable and growing daily.
  • Pay for all the stuffs: Apple Pay isn’t the most widely accepted form of payment around, but it is gaining in popularity and pretty cool. Not sure if NFC is really going to be changing the world, but it might, and a wearable that isn’t specifically a fitness tracker is likely going to need it over the coming year.
  • Price: The Pebble can be $89. The Apple Watch starts at $350 and goes up to thousands (10 of ’em actually).

Overall, the Pebble is inexpensive. At 4 times the cost is the Apple Watch, which has less battery power but way more features. So it’s not Apples to Apples (no pun intended) to compare these. If you’re interested in a really inexpensive wearable and not worried about all the crazy features that come on them, check out the Pebble. But, the Apple Watch, as with many an Apple product, is very much worth the price tag. Unless you’re getting a gold one…

Articles and Books public speaking

Part 2 of the AFP548 Podcast Interview with Pepijn

Love interviewing this guy! Who wants to be next?

Bushel Interviewing Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Part 1: Interviewing Pepijn Bruienne

I count myself very lucky that I got to interview Pepijn Bruienne, who interviewed me some time ago. Both, on the AFP548 podcast. Here’s the first part of me interviewing Pepijn!

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

X World: See You At The Sydney Mac Conference

I’ll be doing a couple of presentations in Sydney on July 9th and 10th at X World. Judging from the sessions in past years, it looks to be a great time that’s sure to make you smarter!

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If you’re able, check it out at http://auc.edu.au/xworld/about/.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Take Control Of OS X Server (Yosemite) Now Available

I’ve been light on posting here, mostly because I’ve been swamped with work, selling my old house, buying a new house, doing some crazy taxes, wrapping production on a new book and updating the Take Control of OS X Server book to Yosemite Server. Well, earlier this week I sold my house, got the next version of Bushel ready to rock and filed my taxes. Aaaaannnnnndddddd, the Yosemite version of Take Control Of OS X Server is now available at http://tid.bl.it/1xuCJUC.

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Boom. Will get back to my normally scheduled postings shortly!

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Ubuntu Unix WordPress

Install Pow for Rails Testing On OS X

Pow is a Rack server for OS X. It’s quick and easy to use and lets you skip that whole update an Apache file, then edit /etc/hosts, ethane move a file, then run an app type of process. To get started with Pow, curl it down and pipe it to a shell, then provide the password when prompted to do so:

odr:~ charlesedge$ curl get.pow.cx | sh
% Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time Current
Dload Upload Total Spent Left Speed
100 9039 100 9039 0 0 10995 0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 10996
*** Installing Pow 0.5.0...
*** Installing local configuration files...
/Users/charlesedge/Library/LaunchAgents/cx.pow.powd.plist
*** Installing system configuration files as root...
Password:
/Library/LaunchDaemons/cx.pow.firewall.plist
/etc/resolver/dev
*** Starting the Pow server...
*** Performing self-test...
*** Installed

For troubleshooting instructions, please see the Pow wiki:
https://github.com/basecamp/pow/wiki/Troubleshooting

To uninstall Pow, `curl get.pow.cx/uninstall.sh | sh`

To install an app into Pow, create a symlink to it using ln (assuming ~/.pow is your current working directory):

ln -s /path/to/myapp

Then just open the url, assuming my app is kryptedapp.com:

open http://kryptedapp.com

Pow can also use ~/Library/LaunchAgents/cx.pow.powd.plist to port proxy. This allows you to redirect different apps to different ports. When pow boots, it runs .powconfig, so there’s a lot you can do there, like export, etc. Once you’re done testing out pow, if you don’t decide it’s awesome, remove it with the following command:

curl get.pow.cx/uninstall.sh | sh

Articles and Books public speaking

Dead Tech Books

As an author of technical books, I’ve been very interested in the comings and goings of technical books for a long time. This new Instagram feed is an expedition into what once was and how quickly the times change. Feed is embedded into a page on krypted to make it easier to see. Curious how many of my books are now “Dead Tech Books”…

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Kerio Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Modern Mac Synchronization with ChronoSync

ChronoSync is one of those tools that’s been in the Mac community for a long time (rightfully so). It’s been a little while since I got the chance to really tinker around with ChronoSync so I thought I’d do a little article on what I got to find during my tinkerations. To get started with ChronoSync, go to their website at http://www.econtechnologies.com/chronosync/overview.html. Next, we’re going to walk through the most basic of setups (and you can get all kinds of complicated from there if you’d like!).

Once you’ve downloaded, ChronoSync, run the installer from the disk image that was downloaded.

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Then walk through the installer, basically following the defaults (unless you’d like to install to a volume other than your boot volume).

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Once the installer is finished, open the app and register the product.

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Once registered, you’ll see a nice screen giving you a few options. We’re going to create a single plan (synchronizer document) to backup a single source to a single target. To do so, click on the option to “Create a new synchronizer document”.

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At the Setup screen, you have a right and left column. When I used to do a lot of manual migrations, I would always always  always line up my source on the left and my target on the right (or invariably you risk data loss by copying in the wrong direction), so the workflow in ChronoSync has always made sense to me. Because a lot of the data I use needs root access, I’m going to select “Local Volumes (Admin access)” in the “Connect to” field and then use the Choose button to select my actual source. Repeat that process in the Right Target section of the screen.

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The default action that will be performed is to backup from the left to the right targets (the term target referring to the folder, not that it’s a source or target in the backup operation). Click into the Operation field to bring up a list of the options that can be performed between your left and right targets.

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The option I’m selecting is “Synchronize Bidirectional” as this is an article about syncing data. The other options are pretty well defined in the manual, but it’s worth mentioning that the Bootable Mirror options are especially useful. Once you’ve set the type of sync, you can also use the Options menu to define some pretty granular settings for your sync. For the purposes of this sync, which brings over server shares, I’m going to leave Conflict resolution set to Ask User and use the custom option under the Special File/Folder Handling section to enable the “Verify copied data” option and “Preserve Comments” option. Note that if you’re doing this on servers and would like to stop a service (such as postgres) before a sync and start it after, you can use the scripts section of this screen. You can also configure notifications, sending emails when syncs have errors, or every time there’s a sync.

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Click Rules to build inclusion/exclusion rules (for example, I don’t often sync things like operating system and software installers since I can just go download them again, pretty easily). Click Archive in the sidebar if you’d like to remove files based on a trigger (e.g. if it’s been removed from the source, archive it, etc).

Next, you can simply click Synchronize to run an immediate sync of the files and folders you’ve defined in your Sync Document. Or, you can click Add to Schedule to define when you’d like to run your Synchronization Documents.

There, less than 5 minutes and we’ve got a pretty advanced sync going. Use the Log button to see how everything went. And remember, always verify that the archives and backups are running on a good schedule. For example, I like to have at least a weekly cadence to make sure that media one each side of a sync can still open. It helps me sleep better.