Tag Archives: MAC

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

DeviceScout

DeviceScout is a tool that leverages JAMF’s Casper Suite to show administrators vital statistics and show alerts on client systems. These alerts display some of the critical aspects of systems, from encryption to disk capacity to backups, there are a number of pretty cool aspects of DeviceScout.

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Using the device view, you can view serial numbers, device types, check-in status, boot volumes, memory, etc. It’s a lot of insight into what you have on your systems. I’m a huge fan of such visibility. You will need to be running Casper to leverage DeviceScout, but it provides a very simple interface for management and even techs to see what’s going on in your enterprise in as quick a manner as possible. Inventory, security status, backup status and a support menu at your fingertips.

With very simple pricing, check out what they have to offer at http://www.devicescout.com.

cloud Mac Security Network Infrastructure

Configure Syslog Options on a Meraki

Meraki has a syslog option. To configure a Meraki to push logs to a syslog server, open your Meraki Dashboard and click on a device. From there, click on “Alerts & administration”.

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At the “Alerts & administration” page scroll down to the Logging section. Click on the “Add a syslog server” link and type the IP address of your syslog servers name or IP. Put the port number into the Port field. Choose what types of events to export. This could be Event Log, Flows or URLs, where:

  • Event Log: The messages from the dashboard under Monitor > Event log.
  • Flows: Inbound and outbound traffic flows generate syslog messages that include the source and destination and port numbers.
  • URL: HTTP GET requests generate syslog entries.

Note that you can direct each type of traffic to a different syslog server.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment public speaking

MacSysAdmin 2014!

Well, it’s that time of the year when one of my favorite conferences opens up registration! Come one, come all to MacSysAdmin for good times, good people and lots of fun Macinnerdiness! I hope to see you there! The official page is up at http://www.macsysadmin.se.
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Active Directory Windows Server Windows XP

Use Syslog on Windows

There are a number of tools available for using Syslog in a Windows environment. I’ll look at Snare as it’s pretty flexible and easy to configure. First download the snare installation executable from http://sourceforge.net/projects/snare. Once downloaded run the installer and simply follow all of the default options, unless you’d like to password protect the admin page, at which point choose that. Note that the admin page is by default only available to localhost.

Once installed, run the “Restore Remote Access to Snare for Windows” script.

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Then open http://127.0.0.1:6161 and click on Network Configuration in the red sidebar. There, we can define the name that will be used in syslog (or leave blank to use the hostname), the port of your syslog server (we used 514 here) and the address of your syslog server (we used logger here but it could be an IP or fqdn).

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Once you have the settings you’d like to use, scroll down and save your configuration settings. Then, open Services and restart the Snare service.

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Then run the Disable Remote Access to Snare for Windows option and you’re done. Now, if you’re deploying Snare across a lot of hosts, you might find that scripting the config is faster. You can send the Destination hostname (here listed as meh) and Destination Port (here 514) via regedit commands (Destination and DestPort respectively) and then restart the service.

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I’ll do another article at some point on setting up a logstash server to dump all these logs into. Logstash can also parse the xml so you can search for each attribute in the logs and with elasticsearch/hadoop/Kibana makes for an elegant interface for parsing through these things.

Active Directory Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Microsoft Exchange Server Network Infrastructure Ubuntu Unix VMware Windows Server

Stashbox: Turning a Mac Mini Into A Logstash and Kibana Server

You have a lot of boxes. You would like to be able to parse through the logs of all those boxes at the same time, searching for a given timestamp across a set of machines for a specific string (like a filename or a port number). elasticsearch, logstash and kibana are one way to answer that kind of need. This will involve downloading three separate packages (which for this article, we’ll do in /usr/local) and creating a config file.

First, install the latest Java JDK. This is available at jdk8-downloads-2133151.html.

The following is going to download the latest version of logstash and untar the package into /usr/local/logstash (I like nesting that logstash-1.4.0 inside logstash so when the next version comes out I can have it there too, I have plenty of space so keeping a couple versions back helps in the event I need some old binary and can’t get to it ’cause they revved out the version I wrote a script against at some point):

curl -O https://download.elasticsearch.org/logstash/logstash/logstash-1.4.0.tar.gz
mkdir /usr/local/logstash
tar zxvf logstash-1.4.0.tar.gz -C /usr/local/logstash

Once we have log stash, we’ll grab elastic search similarly:

curl -O https://download.elasticsearch.org/elasticsearch/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-1.0.1.tar.gz
mkdir /usr/local/elasticsearch
tar zxvf elasticsearch-1.0.1.tar.gz -C /usr/local/elasticsearch

Then we’ll untar kibana in the same manner:

curl -O https://download.elasticsearch.org/kibana/kibana/kibana-3.0.0.tar.gz
mkdir /usr/local/kibana
tar zxvf kibana-3.0.0.tar.gz -C /usr/local/kibana

Next we’ll make a very simple config file that we call /usr/local/stashbox.conf that listens on port 514 for syslog:

input {
tcp {
port => 514
type => syslog
}
udp {
port => 514
type => syslog
}
}
filter {
if [type] == "syslog" {
grok {
match => { "message" => "%{SYSLOGTIMESTAMP:syslog_timestamp} %{SYSLOGHOST:syslog_hostname} %{DATA:syslog_program}(?:\[%{POSINT:syslog_pid}\])?: %{GREEDYDATA:syslog_message}" }
add_field => [ "received_at", "%{@timestamp}" ]
add_field => [ "received_from", "%{host}" ]
}
syslog_pri { }
date {
match => [ "syslog_timestamp", "MMM d HH:mm:ss", "MMM dd HH:mm:ss" ]
}
}
}
output {
elasticsearch { host => localhost }
stdout { codec => rubydebug }
}

Next, we’ll enable elastic search:

/usr/local/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-1.0.1/bin/elasticsearch

And finally, in a different window we’ll call logstash with that file as the config file:

/usr/local/logstash/logstash-1.4.0/bin/logstash -f /usr/local/stashbox.conf

Having each of these open in different Terminal windows allows you to see logs in stdout. Next, point a host at your new syslog box. You can use http://krypted.com/windows-server/use-syslog-on-windows for installing Windows clients or http://krypted.com/mac-security/redirect-logs-to-a-syslog-server-in-os-x/ for  a Mac. Once done, let’s get Kibana working. To do so, first edit the config.js.

vi /usr/local/kibana/kibana-3.0.0/config.js

Locate the elastic search setting and put the name of the host running logstash in there (yes, it can be the same as the actual logstash box as long as you install a web server on the logstash box). Then save the changes.

Now move the contents of that kibana-3.0.0 folder into your web directory. Let’s say this is a basic OS X Server, that would be:

cp -R /usr/local/kibana/kibana-3.0.0/* /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default/

You can then check out your Kibana site at http://localhost or http://localhost/index.html#/dashboard/file/logstash.json for the actual search pages, which is what I’ve bookmarked.

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For example, to see the impact of periodic scripts in System Logs:

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Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Redirect Logs To A Syslog Server In OS X

I could have sworn that I’ve written this up before, but I just tried to link it into the article for tomorrow and it’s not on my site, so here goes. To redirect logs in OS X to a syslog server, open /etc/syslog.conf and add the following line (assuming an IP of 10.10.10.92 – replace that with the IP of your syslog box):

*.*                                       @10.10.10.92

To customize the port number (e.g. 9200) use @10.10.10.92:9200 instead. This should be instant but you can always use launchctl to unload and reload syslog if for some reason it isn’t. If you’re scripting this you can then programmatically send some information to the server. For example, if you enter the following, you should see an entry for testtesttest in your syslog server for the host you just configured:

logger testtesttest

Mac OS X VMware Windows Server Windows XP

Create A Server 2012 VM In VMware Fusion

Our friends at VMware continue to outdo themselves. The latest release of Fusion works so well with Windows Server 2013 that even I can’t screw it up. To create a virtual machine, simply open VMware Fusion and click New from the File menu.

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Click “Choose a disc or disc image.”

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Select your iso for Server 2012 and click on Open (if you have actual optical media it should have skipped this step and automatically sensed your installation media). Click Continue back at the New Virtual Machine Assistant screen.

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Click Continue when the Assistant properly shows the operating system and version.

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Enter a username, password and serial number for Windows Server if you want Fusion to create these things automatically and just complete an installation. If not, uncheck Easy Install (but seriously, who doesn’t like easy). Also, choose the version of Windows Server (note that there’s no GUI with the Core options). Click Continue.

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At the Finish screen, you can click Customize Settings if you would like to give the new virtual machine more memory or disk. Otherwise, just click Finish.

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When prompted, choose where the new virtual machine will live and click Save. The VM then boots into the Setup is starting screen. You will be prompted for a Core vs. a GUI install (I know, you picked that earlier). I choose a GUI, then click Next.

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When the setup is complete, login, run Software Update and you’re done!

Mac OS X Mass Deployment

Password Hints and Retries in OS X

You can customize the number of times that you enter an incorrect password before you get the password hint in the loginwindow on OS X. To do so, use the defaults command to send a RetriesUntilHint integer key into com.apple.loginwindow.plist stored at /Library/Preferences using the following command:

defaults write /Library/Preferences/com.apple.loginwindow RetriesUntilHint -integer 10

Xsan

Access Qlogic Switches & Other Java Apps From OS X

Qlogic fibre channel switches are about the most common I see in Xsan environments. A common frustration when managing a Qlogic switch is that the Java runtime used to manage the switch is blocked from most OS X systems by default. But it’s pretty easy to get into them with a couple of minor adjustments.

To get started, first download and install the latest Java from here. Once installed, open System Preferences on your Mac and then open the Java Preferences. Here, click on the Security tab.

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Click Edit Site List… In the pop-up, click Add and enter http:// followed by the name or IP address of your switch.

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Click on OK to commit your changes. Then access the switch address from Firefox (what I use for these) or whatever browser you prefer. Because the switch has a self-signed certificate, you’ll be prompted with a  security warning. Here, click the checkbox for “I accept the risk and want to run this application” and then click on the Run button.

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You’ll then be prompted by another Security Warning dialog. This one is indicating that the Java applet is potentially unsafe. Because we somewhat trust Qlogic, click Don’t Block. You’ll have to click this one every time you access the switch.

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The switch interface then opens and you can manage your switch as needed.

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 10.45.20 AM

Enjoy.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Xsan

Test Volume Speeds for Xsan Metadata Controllers

I have used a variety of tools for testing the speed of Xsan volumes. But none have been as easy as the BlackMagic Disk Speed Test. It’s cute, it’s fast, it’s very informative and it requires no Terminal, unlike the other tools I’ve used for years. To use Disk Speed Test, first download it from the Mac App Store (it’s free). Then mount the volume you’d like to test and open the Disk Speed Test app.

BlackMagic1

 

Click on the Settings icon in the middle and select the volume you’d like to test.

BlackMagic2

Then click Start. Enjoy.