Tag Archives: MAC

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Roundcube for OS X Server

The latest Roundcube installer for OS X Server is now available at http://topicdesk.com/downloads/roundcube. This update, which provides a pretty awesome WebMail interface to OS X Server’s Mail Service provides the following:

  • One installer that supports all Mavericks and Yosemite
  • Roundcube WebMail 1.0.3 installed as a WebApp
  • Automatically Configured Plugins
  • Roundcube CardDav: Server-based address books
  • Roundcube Managesieve: Server-side mail filtering and vacation messages
  • PHP and Roundcube Config automatically configured for a typical Mac installation
  • sqllite database – we no longer use Postgres
  • Integration with the Mail Service running on OS X Server
Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Scripted Country Geolocations Using OS X’s Built-In ip2cc

Recently I was working on a project where we were isolating IP addresses by country. In the process, I found an easy little tool built right into OS X called ip2cc. Using ip2cc, you can lookup what country an IP is in. To do so, simply run ip2cc followed by a name or ip address. For example, to lookup apple.com you might run:

ip2cc apple.com

Or to lookup Much Music, you might run:

ip2cc muchmusic.ca

The output would be:

IP::Country modules (v2.28)
Copyright (c) 2002-13 Nigel Wetters Gourlay
Database updated Wed May 15 15:29:48 2013

Name: muchmusic.com
Address: 199.85.71.88
Country: CA (Canada)

You can just get the country line:

ip2cc apple.com | grep Country:

To just get the country code:

ip2cc apple.com | grep Country: | awk '{ print $2 }'

Finally, ip2cc is located at /usr/bin/ip2cc so we’ll complicate things just a tad by replacing the hostname with the current IP (note that private IPs can’t be looked up, so this would only work if you’re rocking on a wan ip or feeding it what a curl from a service like whatismyip brings back):

ip2cc `ipconfig getifaddr en0` | grep Country: | awk '{ print $2 }'

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure Programming Ubuntu Unix

Opposite Day: Reversing Lines In Files

The other day, my daughter said “it’s opposite day” when it was time to do a little homework, trying to get out of it! Which reminded me of a funny little command line tool called rev. Rev reads a file and reverses all the lines. So let’s touch a file called rev ~/Desktop/revtest and then populate it with the following lines:

123
321
123

Now run rev followed by the file name:

rev ~/Desktop/revtest

Now cat it:

cat !$

Now rev it again:

rev !$

You go go forward and back at will for fun, much more fun than homework… Enjoy!

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Refresh OS X CRLs

I recently found an existing image with a lot of stale crl information. We couldn’t rebuild the image, so we decided to instead refresh all of the crl information. This information is stored in /var/db/crls/crlcache.db. Deleting the file turned out to be problematic so we needed to clear items out of the tables instead. While this could be done using a few different tools, it turns out there’s a command built into os x to take care of this process for us called crlrefresh.

To use crlrefresh to clean up stale crlinformation and fetch new crlinformation for all CRL and certificates, use:

crlrefresh rpvv

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

See How Long The Active User Has Logged In On A Mac

The following will grab you an integer of the number of hours an active user has logged into a computer:

user=$( ls -l /dev/console | awk '{ print $3 }' ) ; ac users $user | awk '{ print $2 }'

 

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Casper 9.62 Is Out!

Casper 9.62 is now out! And holy buckets, look at all the stuff that got fixed in this release:

Casper-Suite-9.62-Release-Notes_320_414_84_1416419790

http://resources.jamfsoftware.com/documents/products/documentation/Casper-Suite-9.62-Release-Notes.pdf?mtime=1416856726

PS – There’s also some api improvement goodness!

Mac OS X

Quick-Tip: Menu Items Modifier Keys In OS X

A modifier key is a key that when held in combination with another key, causes a unique behavior. For example, Command-c copies highlighted data to your clipboard. The Finder modifier keys are pretty well documented. But a number of menu items support modifier keys as well. For example:

  • Click on the Dropbox item in your menu, you’ll be able to see the status of files that have sync’d as well as a cogwheel with the typical settings for an app like Dropbox. Option-click on the Dropbox menu item, you’ll see the items under the cogwheel menu.
  • Option-click the Wi-Fi menu item to see extended Wi-Fi information.
  • Option-click Bluetooth, you’ll see version and MAC address information for your bluetooth interface (note that the extended options are usually greyed out/informational).
  • Option-click on the sound menu item and you can switch input and output devices (these extended options are actually shown as you can switch between things).
  • Option-click AirPlay and you get, well, the same menu. So not all support extended information and options.
  • Option-click Go to see Library.
  • Option-click the Menu menu to see shift modifier keys to access All options (this actually works on a lot of menus such as Finder, File and Edit, but even within some apps).
  • Option-click on the Notifications menu item and you disable Notification Center.

Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 8.15.03 PM

But my favorite, for Apple apps, if you command-click on items, you can just drag them out of your menu. This saves you from firing up System Preferences and unchecking the box to remove them from the menu.

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

MacVoices Podcast With Chuck Joiner About The New Take Control Of OS X Server Book!

Yay, podcasts! Chuck Joiner was kind enough to have me on MacVoices. We did a show, now available at http://www.macvoices.com/macvoices-14223-charles-edge-helps-take-control-os-x-server

Or if you’d like to watch on YouTube or inline:

http://youtu.be/AeccoRqIrgc

Bushel iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Bushel Goes Into Invitation Mode!

Yesterday the Bushel team finished some new code. This code allows you to refer your friends to Bushel! This skips the codes that everyone was waiting for and lets people create accounts immediately!

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 10.07.02 PM

From your home screen, click on Invite Friends. Or from the Account screen, scroll down to the section that says “Invite friends to join Bushel”. From here, you can post codes to Facebook, Tweet codes, post codes to LinkedIn and even email them.

We’re not going into general availability just yet. But we’re definitely making it easier long-term to sign up and use Bushel! We hope you love it as much as we do!

Since we’re still architecting how these final screens look, the final features and stress testing the servers, also if you’re testing the system please feel free to fill out our feedback form so we know what you think of what we’re doing and where we’re going!

Or if you’re still waiting for a code, use this link to skip that process https://signup.bushel.com?r=fd0fcf9e6d914a739d29c90421c0fb45.

Articles and Books Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

My Take Control Of OS X Server Book Now Available!

Thanks to all the awesome work from Adam and Tanya Engst, Tidbits announced today that my Take Control of OS X Server is now available! To quote some of the Tidbits writeup:

Some projects turn out to be harder than expected, and while Charles Edge’s “Take Control of OS X Server” was one of them, we’re extremely pleased to announce that the full 235-page book is now available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobipocket versions to help anyone in a home or small office environment looking to get started with Apple’s OS X Server.

As you’ll likely remember, we published this book chapter by chapter for TidBITS members, finishing it in early September (see “‘Take Control of OS X Server’ Streaming in TidBITS,” 12 May 2014). Doing so got the information out more quickly, broke up the writing and editing effort, and elicited reader comments that helped us refine the text.

Normally, we would have moved right into final editing and published the book quickly, but from mid-September on, our attention has been focused on OS X 10.10 Yosemite, iOS 8, and our new Take Control Crash Course series. We were working non-stop, and while we wanted to release “Take Control of OS X Server,” we felt it was more important to finish the books about Apple’s new operating systems for the thousands of people who rely on Take Control for technical assistance.

During that time, we had the entire book copyedited by Caroline Rose, who’s best known for writing and editing Inside Macintosh Volumes I through III at Apple and being the editor in chief at NeXT. Plus, we went over the book carefully to ensure that it used consistent terminology and examples, optimized the outline, and improved many of the screenshots.

The main problem with this delay was that Apple has now updated OS X Server from version 3.2.2 (Mavericks Server, which is what we used when writing the book) to 4.0 (Yosemite Server, which is all that works in Yosemite). Updating the book for Yosemite Server would delay it even longer. Luckily for us, veteran system administrators say that you should never upgrade OS X Server on a production machine right away. And even luckier, the changes in Yosemite Server turn out to be extremely minor (a sidebar in the Introduction outlines them), so those who want to get started now can use the instructions in the book with no problem. It’s also still possible to buy Mavericks Server and install it on a Mac running Mavericks, as long as you have the right Mac App Store link from the book. We are planning to update the book for Yosemite Server (which mostly involves retaking screenshots and changing the “mavserver” name used in examples) in early 2015 — it will be a free update for all purchasers.

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 7.59.44 PM

You can find out more about the book at http://www.takecontrolbooks.com/osx-server. An update will be due out in early 2015, so stay tuned for more!