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JAMF Nation User Conference

As the largest Apple IT gathering in the world rapidly approaches, we want to give you an early glimpse into the great presentations at the JAMF Nation User Conference (JNUC).

We are excited to announce that we’ve added the first ten JNUC sessions to our site. With sessions for education and commercial organizations, you’re sure to find presentations to meet your needs. Highlights include best practices for preparing Macs for online testing, ways to bring Apple’s Volume Purchase Program (VPP) and Device Enrollment Program (DEP) to life in your environment, and methods for mitigating and addressing Mac security threats.

Haven’t registered yet? There’s still time, but hurry. We’re nearing our capacity. 

Secure your spot and start making your travel plansand accommodations before it’s too late. We hope you can make it!

RSVP Today

August 26th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X

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The jamf binary comes with a lot of cool little features that you can use to script things quickly, because JAMF has already built things to help you. We’ll look at two really quick. The first is the deleteAccount verb which, surprisingly, deletes accounts. With that verb, you’ll use the -username operator to define a given user that you’d like to remove. That username is defined as the short name (or what dscl shows) of a given user. For example, if I wanted to remove the user rorygilmore, I’d run the following command:

/usr/sbin/jamf deleteAccount -username rorygilmore

You can then provide a popup on the screen that you completed that action:

/usr/sbin/jamf displayMessage -message “rorygilmore has been deleted"

You can then add a new user, using the createAccount verb. To do so, run the jamf binary using the createAccount verb. This verb provides for a number of options, including a short name (-username), a full name (-realname), a password (-password), a home directory (-home) and a default shell (-shell). If you want the user to be an admin of the system you can also add an -admin option. Below, we’ll string it all together:

/usr/sbin/jamf createAccount -username lorelaigilmore -realname "Lorelai Gilmore" -password lukedanes -home /Users/lorelai -shell bash -admin

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When I do this stuff I like to run a quick recon again:

/usr/sbin/jamf recon

If you have any questions, you can use the help verb to see what all this thing can do:

/usr/sbin/jamf help

And if you need more information on a given verb, run the help verb followed by the one you need more information on:

/usr/sbin/jamf help policy

 

October 6th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I was super-bummed that I missed the MacAdmins conference at Penn State University. But, all is not lost as MacAdmins will be held July 8-10 in 2015 at the Penn Stater Conference Center and I’ll be able to see all those awesome people there next year!

In the meantime, something fun and new is the 2014 MacAdmins Playlist to maybe get exposed to some new stuff: http://spoti.fi/VTdxLX.

As an aside, here’s a fun pic of @derflounder and I (and others) doing a round table from a few years ago on the Penn State site:

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 1.25.10 PM

 

July 15th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, public speaking

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JSS-autopkg-addon Presentation from Allister Banks on Vimeo.

(Guest post by Allister Banks)

On June 26th, I had the pleasure of being invited by @Tecnico1931 to the NYC Metro JAMF user group meeting.

A worksheet I created for this event may be found here: url.aru-b.com/jssAutopkg

See also Shea Craig’s python-jss, and thanks go out to James Barclay, Sam Johnson, and all the folks mentioned in the video.

July 1st, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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Some time ago, I had the good fortune of reading Guy Kawasaki’s Enchantment (thanks to MacTech for hooking me up with it!). It was a book filled with many of the things that are good in the business world today and how to make them better by adopting them in your own organization. Since reading that book, I’ve looked for enchantment. I’ve searched in the technology coming out of new products, in social causes that I’ve become involved with, in trips out of town and within myself.

Today (now yesterday), I was truly enchanted. At my new employer, there is a charitable foundation publicly released at the JNUC last year. I thought it was cool when it was introduced. But seeing the eyes of the person that administers the program light up as she went through all the nooks and crannies and seeing the importance placed upon it at the organization really made me take an even greater notice.

I like to give my time and whatever resources possible back to my community. I’ve never considered this charity, nor my duty, nor commendable, nor enough. Instead it’s just part of being a person. To see someone who is so enchanted with what the company is doing in that regard, that they can bring that enchantment to others and engage a room of new hires fresh off a heavy lunch (let alone keep them awake) was just… enchanting.

enchantment

Thanks to all involved for the experience and I look forward to many more like it!

June 28th, 2014

Posted In: personal

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If you do deployments of Apple products, there are a few conferences to look at. Based on where you are and what industry you are in, some of these are better than others. But if you use the Casper Suite or are considering doing so, it would be really hard to beat JNUC, the JAMF Nation User Conference.

jamf-nation-user-conference-2014_1140_464_84_1399405603

And yes, I’d of said all this and posted this even if I hadn’t of come to work here a week and a half ago! So come one, come all to Minneapolis. And if you’re really nice, we’ll hook you up with some good old fashioned Minnesota lutefisk!

June 11th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Minneapolis

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DeviceScout is a tool that leverages JAMF’s Casper Suite to show administrators vital statistics and show alerts on client systems. These alerts display some of the critical aspects of systems, from encryption to disk capacity to backups, there are a number of pretty cool aspects of DeviceScout.

Screen Shot 2014-04-18 at 2.55.47 PM

Using the device view, you can view serial numbers, device types, check-in status, boot volumes, memory, etc. It’s a lot of insight into what you have on your systems. I’m a huge fan of such visibility. You will need to be running Casper to leverage DeviceScout, but it provides a very simple interface for management and even techs to see what’s going on in your enterprise in as quick a manner as possible. Inventory, security status, backup status and a support menu at your fingertips.

With very simple pricing, check out what they have to offer at http://www.devicescout.com.

April 19th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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(Guest post by Allister Banks)

Working with modern tools in the ‘auto'(dmg/pkg) suite, it sure reinforces the old chestnut, ‘it’s turtles XML all the way down.’ The thing that struck me when first diving into using autopkg was that different product recipes could potentially have a good amount of similarities when they share common processors. One example is drag-drop apps that can be discovered with an ‘appcast’ URL, which, in my recollection, became common as the Sparkle framework gained popularity.

This commonality is exactly the type of thing sysadmins like myself seek to automate, so I built a few helper scripts to 1. discover what apps have appcast URLs, 2. generate the base download recipe, and further, the 3. pkg-building recipe that can use the download recipe as a ‘parent’, and the 4. munki or JSS recipes which can nest the pkg recipe in it. Recursivity is the new black.

screnshotsOfCode

Please do take a look if you feel you’ve got apps that folks haven’t built recipes for yet, and laugh at/use/fork my code as you see fit!

April 3rd, 2014

Posted In: Uncategorized

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(Guest Post by Allister Banks)

Chocolate+PeanutButter

As Venn diagram circles go, many folks in our community are getting into autopkg, and there’s even more that already use the JAMF Casper Suite. Over on the 318.com blog there’s an announcement for a new ‘processor’ add-on that can be installed with autopkg, that therefore can leverage the JSS API to fulfill many of the functions which up until present only Munki enjoyed. Please do read the release notes and give it a try!

January 6th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mass Deployment

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I recently needed to restart tomcat on a JSS (my fault not theirs). Because I had other processes running on the same box, I used the jssutil command to restart the tomcat service, using jssutil along with the rt verb:

jssutil rt

Turned out I had screwed things up a little more than all that so tomcat didn’t come back on its own, to get the service to kick back on, use the same command along with the startTomcat verb:

jssutil startTomcat

September 13th, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mass Deployment

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