Tag Archives: ipod touch

Bushel Product Management

Interview with Chuck Joiner of MacVoices re: Bushel

My third podcast in the last couple of months, this time with Chuck Joiner again, of MacVoices. And we talked a pretty good bit about Bushel and Mobile Device Management. Thanks to Chuck formatting this whole thing pretty awesome and helping bring my explanations to a point where they actually make sense!

http://www.macvoices.com/macvoices-15055-charles-edge-jamf-software-discusses-mobile-device-management-bushel/

Wearable Technology

Integrate Nike Running App With Apple’s Health App

The new Health app from Apple provides a conduit to run all of your health data through on an iOS device in order to then provide you with a single pane of glass to see all of your health related data. This can include diet, workouts, weight, blood pressure, etc, provided that the vendors of such devices or apps you may use support those features. The Nike Running app (not yet for the Fuelband) is one such app. And if you track runs with Nike Running then you’ll want to setup the integration asap, as the Health app only looks at runs that are configured after you setup the integration.

To integrate the app into Health (and therefore showcase what Health can do) we’ll simply upgrade it and do so real quick. The first step is to upgrade the Nike+ Running app. To do so, open the App Store, tap on Updates and find the Nike+ Running app. Here, tap Update and provide your password.

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When the app is finished updating, open it. You should be prompted on the first open after the update to setup Health Access. Here, use the sliders for each of the items you’d like to sync to Health. These include your NikeFuel (the fuel points obtained per run), the Workouts and, if you have a device that tracks Heart Rate, whether or not the Running app can access that Heart Rate data. Tap Done when you’re satisfied with your settings.

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From within the Health app, you can then see what Health reads from and writes to the NikeFuel app. Open the Health app, tap on Fitness and then NikeFuel. Here, you can change the settings that were previously configured.

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The NikeFuel entry will then start to sync with your Nike account. Tapping on NikeFuel in the Health app provides you the option to Show on Dashboard, which is the first screen of your Health app. Toggle this to enable the option.

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Once enabled, you can see stats from your Nike Running app on the dashboard in Health. The data is then useable by other apps that can also integrate with Health, provided you allow it.

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When the next run is synchronized, you should see data from the run populate the NikeFuel entry on the dashboard. The FuelBand, Nike Basketball and Nike Training Club apps have not been integrated into Health. But when they are, I’ll try and remember to come back and update this article.

 

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Upgrade to iOS 7 from an iOS Device.

Most of my readers have already upgraded from iOS 6 to iOS 7. But, you might need to write some technical documentation on how to do so for your end users. If you find yourself in such a situation, you can just cut-copy-paste this article into your own documentation.

Preflight

First, backup the device. When I did this upgrade I was flying without a net and didn’t bother to back the device I was upgrading up. Having said that, I also don’t keep any data on my device, so I would strongly recommend backing up before you do your upgrade if you do have content you want to make sure your preserve. The upgrade doesn’t erase your data; however, whenever you’re doing a major update, it’s a good idea to backup (it’s also a good idea to backup when you’re not doing a major update). If you need to backup, check out this article on manually backing up with iTunes.

Most will also want to go ahead and update to iTunes 11.1. This will allow the device to work once it’s been upgraded.

Finally, before you get started, connect your device to a power source as you wouldn’t want the device to possibly die due to a power failure in the middle of running the update.

Installation

Once you’ve backed up, open the Settings app on the device.

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From within the Settings app, tap on General to open the General pane of the Settings app..

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From the General pane of the Settings app, tap on Software Update.

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From the Software Update screen tap on Download and Install to start the installation, or let’s tap on Learn More to see what’s in the update.

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At the Learn More screen, you’ll see the release note for the software. This is a major OS update, so there are pages and pages of notes about what this update is for. Provided you’re happy with these updates, tap on Software Update at the top of the screen to go back to the Software Update screen and tap on Download and Install to begin the installation process.

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From the Terms and Conditions page, tap on Agree to accept the license agreement (obviously provided that you do) and the update will run. This is going to take awhile. You can use the device while the update is running (it will even keep the state of Safari browsing once restarted).

The device will restart automatically once updated.

Now that you’re done with the upgrade, go ahead and back the device up again in iTunes and start exploring some of the awesome new features.

Note for Apple Configurator users, in order to get the power of iOS 7 you’ll need to update to Apple Configurator 1.4, available on the App store as of today. The release notes for it:

Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 3.57.53 PM

 

Good luck!

iPhone

SimpleMDM Now With Apps

SimpleMDM has updated their Mobile Device Management solution (my original writeup is here) to now include the ability to manage apps. The apps functionality really comes in two flavors. The first is the ability to load up an app. This is handled handed by clicking on Settings in the right hand navigation bar and then at the Settings pop-over, clicking on Apps. Here, you can load up an internal, enterprise app or an App Store app.

Once you’ve loaded an app you can deploy it to devices by clicking on a group and then using the contextual menu to “Assign Apps.” Simple, as the name implies.

The second aspect of SimpleMDM is to white and blacklist apps. Doing so is done by clicking on the contextual menu and then clicking on Rules. Here, you can Allow or Disallow any app that has been loaded into the app catalog.

 

iPhone

Volume Purchasing Program Now Available In More Countries

The Volume Purchasing Program is a program from Apple that allows you to buy gift codes en masse for distribution to users, either by mail merging them and sending them out or using a special tool for distribution, such as Apple Configurator or an MDM solution. If you’re in the United States and work with iOS, you’ve likely been using the Volume Purchasing Program for awhile. But for users in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United Kingdom, the Volume Purchasing Program is new and probably being well received.

The Volume Purchasing Program allows users to receive the codes and install/purchase software without being gifted money to do so, although in most cases the users will need Apple IDs. This is because the Volume Purchasing Program still requires codes to be redeemed, although if you’re using Apple Configurator you can deploy apps without tying them to unique AppleIDs.

Overall, the Volume Purchasing Program is a great way to be able to control and manage app expenditures, and for users in the newly added countries, will help with deployments large and small. To access the Volume Purchasing Program site, see http://www.apple.com/business/vpp. To quote Apple:

Deliver essential business apps to your employees with the Volume Purchase Program, now available in Australia, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, the UK, and the US. VPP makes it easy to purchase iOS apps in any quantity and distribute them to your users. You can also have custom apps built for your company’s unique needs. Search thousands of useful apps, specify any quantity, and use a corporate credit card to complete your purchase. Download the updated VPP Guide for details.

iPhone Mass Deployment

Backing Up And Restoring iOS Devices in iTunes

For many iOS deployment projects, iTunes is used as the primary deployment vehicle for the devices. iTunes can be used to “Backup” and “Restore” an iPad, similar to how you image desktop and laptop computers.

The actual deployment process is straight forward. First we’ll create a backup in iTunes. Then we can deploy the backup using the Restore option within iTunes. Provided the backup is encrypted, the Restore option will maintain the maximum amount of data available. For example, if a device has been activated then the fact that it has been activated is maintained across a restore. As are the applications that are installed on the device.

Create iTunes Backup

To Create an iTunes Backup:

  • Open iTunes and dock the device with the master configuration.
  • Check the box to “Encrypt local backup.”
  • At the Set Password screen, provide a password for the encrypted backup.
  • In order to ease restore, check the box for “Remember this password in my keychain (passwords are set to user names).
  • Control-click on the name of the device in the DEVICES section.
  • Click on “Back up”.
  • If prompted, click Set Password (subsequent backups will not require passwords).

Restoring with iTunes

To Restore an iTunes Backup:

  • Open iTunes and dock the device to be restored.
  • Control-click on the device.
  • Click “Restore from Backup”
  • At the “Restore From Backup” screen, select the name used in the previous backup.
  • Click Restore.
  • If prompted, enter the Password.
  • Rename the iPad once the restore process is complete.
  • Once the Restore is complete, if prompted to “Set Up Your iPad”, uncheck the Automatically sync songs and videos to my iPad box and “Automatically sync apps to my iPad”, putting the students Active Directory name in the Name field and clicking Done
iPhone Mass Deployment

Using Apple Configurator To Automate Casper MDM Enrollment

Enrolling iPads into the JAMF Casper MDM solution is done through Apple Configurator, messages or using links deployed to iOS devices as web clips. When doing larger deployments the enrollment process can be automated so that devices are automatically enrolled into Casper MDM when they are set up using an Enrollment Profile that is manually downloaded from Casper and deployed to device. Additionally, a certificate can be needed if the certificate is not included in the profile, an option available as a checkbox in the setup. While you hopefully won’t need to download the certificate, we’ll start there:

Obtain the Certificate for the JSS Server

To obtain the trust certificate from the JSS Server:

  1. Open the web interface for the JSS.
  2. When prompted to trust the certificate, click on the disclosure triangle and then the checkbox to trust the cert, providing the administrative credentials when prompted.
  3. Open Keychain Utility.
  4. Click in the search field.
  5. Search for JSS.
  6. Control-click on the name of your server’s “Built-in Certificate Authority” entry.
  7. Choose the option to Export.
  8. When prompted, provide a name for the certificate in the Save As fiel.
  9. Choose a location to save the certificate to using the Where field.
  10. The .cer format is sufficient for our purposes.
  11. Click Save.

Download the Enrollment Profile

To download an enrollment profile from Casper MDM:

  1. Log into the web interface of the JSS.
  2. Click on the link for Mobile Device Enrollment
  3. At the Mobile Device Enrollment Invitations screen, click on the Enrollment Profiles tab.
  4. At the Enrollment Profiles screen, click on Download for the appropriate profile (for most environments there should only be one)
  5. Once the profile is downloaded, it will automatically attempt to enroll the computer you are downloading it from in the Profiles System Preferences pane.
  6. Click on Cancel.
  7. Click on the downloads link in Safari.
  8. Click on the magnifying glass icon to see the .mobileconfig file.

You have now downloaded the .mobileconfig file that will enroll devices into Casper MDM.

Add the Profile To Apple Configurator:

To deploy the profile through Apple Configurator:

  1. Open Apple Configurator on the client computer.
  2. Click on Prepare in the row of icons along the top of the screen.
  3. Drag the profile (by default currently called MDM-iOS5.mobileconfig) from the Finder into the list of Profiles.
  4. The profile then appears in Apple Configurator (in this example, called MDM-iOS5).

Deploy The Casper MDM Enrollment Profile Through Apple Configurator

Once the profile is installed in Apple Configurator, let’s deploy it. In this example, don’t configure any other options. To deploy:

  1. Set the name to be blank, numbering should be disabled, Supervision should be off, iOS should be set to No Change, “Erase before installing” should be unchecked, Don’t Restore Backup should be set in the Restore field.
  2. Check the box for the newly added profile (MDM-iOS5 in this example).
  3. Click on the Prepare button.
  4. At the “Are you sure you want to apply these settings to all USB-connected devices?” screen, click on the Apply button.
  5. The subsequent screen shows when devices are being configured. Here, dock the device to receive the profile (note, all docked iOS devices are going to be configured with this profile).
  6. Once the device is connected, the profile will begin to install. You are then prompted to “Tap device to install profile”.
  7. On the device, tap on the Install button.
  8. At the Warning screen, tap Install.
  9. Once the Profile is installed, tap Done.
  10. You have now been enrolled.

If you then wish to unenroll, simply remove the profiles by tapping on profiles and then tapping on the Remove button. Per the MDM API, a user can elect to remove their device from management at any point, so expect this will happen occasionally, even if only by accident.

iPhone Mass Deployment

Apple Configurator 1.1 Released

Apple Configurator 1.1 was released on Monday. Configurator is updated through the App Store. It comes with a few new features, indicated on the App Store download page.

My favorite part is probably that rather than let me do stupid things (which I am apt to do) I now get a screen warning me that I’m doing something stupid if Configurator doesn’t complete a sanity check against one of the profiles:

Overall, the two updates that we’ve gotten to Configurator have been minor. The features and options, which make up the strategies that you deploy Configurator with, have remained pretty much the same. I look forward to seeing continued updates.

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure

Video on Setting Up Profile Manager in Lion Server

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Apple Configurator 1.0.1 Released

Apple has released version 1.0.1 of the Apple Configurator tool. To install the first update to Apple’s new tool, go to the App Store on a computer that has Apple Configurator installed, click on Updates and then click on the Update button for Apple Configurator.

The update has a number of new features and fixes. The first is that Enterprise Apps can be installed. Previously, when you went to install internally developed applications, you would get an error that the installation could not proceed. Another great fix is that commas are now escaped when importing application codes from the VPP spreadsheets (a comma in a CSV/comma separated value would kill the ability to import VPP codes before). Another fix is to let you pull redemption codes from unsupervised device (this makes me very happy).

The redemption codes that you buy an app with can also now be used in Configurator, according to the release notes. This worked for me anyway, but I’ve read reports that people had to burn an additional code to use them with Configurator. The remaining redemption codes are now listed properly, as well. Another fix is that Notes and Bookmarks pushed into iBooks and iTunes U are restored properly when supervising devices. The WPA2 passwords had been wonky (according to the content of that payload), so that’s been fixed as well.

Also, a bug I hadn’t noticed, the capacity of an 8GB iPod Touch is now displaying properly…