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Configuring Calendar Server in Mountain Lion Server is a fairly simple and straight forward process. The Calendar Server is a CalDAV Server, leveraging HTTP and HTTPS, running on ports 8008 and 8443 respectively. To enable the Calendar service in Mountain Lion Server, open the Server application and click on Calendar in the SERVICES section of the sidebar.
Enabling the Calendar Server in Mountain Lion Server

Enabling the Calendar Server in Mountain Lion Server

Once open, click on Edit to enable email notifications of invitations in the Calendar Server. Provide the email address and then click on the Next button.
Mountain Lion Server :: Configuring Email Notifications in Calendar Server

Mountain Lion Server :: Configuring Email Notifications in Calendar Server

At the Configure Server Email Address screen, provide the type of incoming mail service in use, provide the address of the mail server and then the port number used, if not a standard port for HTTPS-based IMAP (or POP if you’d prefer), the user name and the valid password for the account. Then click on the Next button.
Mountain Lion Calendar Server :: Configuring IMAP

Mountain Lion Calendar Server :: Configuring IMAP

At the outgoing mail server screen, provide the Outgoing Mail Server address, the port, whether or not SSL is in use (it should be if possible), the password protocol, the user name and the password. Then click on the Next button.
Mountain Lion Calendar Server :: Verify Settings

Mountain Lion Calendar Server :: Verify Settings

At the Mail Account Summary screen, review the settings and if correct, click Finish. Back at the service configuration screen, click on the plus sign (“+”) and provide a type of location, a name for the location, whether or not invitations to the resource are accepted and then enter the account name for any accounts that can manage the location’s calendar (they will auto-complete, so there’s no need to remember users and groups exactly). Click Done to complete the setup. Use the Resource setting in type to configure a resource instead of a location. The two are the same, except the Type field.
Creating Locations in the Calendar Service of Mountain Lion Server

Creating Locations in the Calendar Service of Mountain Lion Server

There are a number of settings that can also be configured. But those are exposed only at the command line. To configure them, open the command line and then review the list of Calendar service settings using the list option of the serveradmin command: sudo serveradmin settings calendar One of the more common settings to configure is the port number that CalDAV runs on. To configure HTTP: sudo serveradmin settings calendar:HTTPPort = 8008 For HTTPS: sudo serveradmin settings calendar:SSLPort = 8443 You can then start the service using the start option: sudo serveradmin start calendar Or to stop it: sudo serveradmin stop calendar Or to get the status: sudo serveradmin fullstatus calendar Once the Calendar server is configured, use the Calendar application to communicate with the server. Open the Calendar application and click on the Calendar menu and select Preferences. From the Preferences screen, click on Accounts to bring up a list of accounts. Here, click on the plus sign (“+”) to bring up the “Add an Account” screen.
Adding An Account In Mountain Lion's Calendar App

Adding An Account In Mountain Lion’s Calendar App

At the “Add an Account” screen, select CalDAV from the Account Type menu and then enter the User Name and password configured on the server, as well as the address of the server. The User Name is usually the name provided in Server app, followed by @ and then the address of the server.
Account Settings In Mountain Lion's Calendar App

Account Settings In Mountain Lion’s Calendar App

Once the server is configured it appears in the list of accounts in the sidebar of the Calendar app. Create calendars in the account and then to share a calendar, right-click on the calendar and click on Share Calendar…
Sharing a CalDAV Calendar

Sharing a CalDAV Calendar

At the Share Calendar screen, provide the name the calendar should appear as to others and click on the plus sign (“+”) and enter any accounts to delegate administration to.
Mountain Lion Calendar Settings

Mountain Lion Calendar Settings

Back at the Calendar Settings screen, use the settings to configure Availability and refresh rate of calendars, as seen above. Click on Server Settings to assign custom port numbers.
Mountain Lion Calendar Address Screen

Mountain Lion Calendar Address Screen

Click on the Delegation tab to view any accounts you’ve been given access to.
Account Delegation In Mountain Lion's Calendar Server

Account Delegation In Mountain Lion’s Calendar Server

Use the Edit button to configure who has delegated access to calendars, as opposed to configuring subscriptions. Overall, the Calendar service in Mountain Lion Server is one of the easiest to configure. Most of the work goes into settings configured on client systems. This, as with Exchange, dedistributes administration, often making administration more complicated than with many other tools. But that’s a good thing; no one wants to access other peoples accounts, for calendars or mail for that matter, without those users knowing that it was done, as will happen when resetting passwords…

July 30th, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Microsoft Exchange Server

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I discuss a lot of RFCs on this site and I at times will reference having a solution so tricked out that it makes you coffee. My good friend Ehren therefore sent me a link to an RFC to have a web browser manage the coffee pot. I am wholly behind this effort and think that with descriptions like this of method definitions, how could you possibly go wrong:
Coffee pots heat water using electronic mechanisms, so there is no fire. Thus, no firewalls are necessary, and firewall control policy is irrelevant. However, POST may be a trademark for coffee, and so the BREW method has been added. The BREW method may be used with other HTTP-based protocols (e.g., the Hyper Text Brewery Control Protocol).
There is also a great line in the Security section reading:
Anyone who gets in between me and my morning coffee should be insecure.
Read more at http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2324.html#ixzz0dNIixf8k RFC2324, you made my day! Read more:http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2324.html#ixzz0dNJZJLPs

January 23rd, 2010

Posted In: personal

Tags: , , ,