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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

OS X Server 5, running on El Capitan or Yosemite, comes complete with lots of awesome features to help you get up and running, started and owning the configuration of Apple Servers. One such is the built-in options to help manage your servers. Open Server, click Help, then click Server Help. You can then search and browse for information about things you’d like to accomplish using the Help Center. Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 11.33.57 PM Now, click the arrow for each service for information about configuring that service. You will see an arrow for each service. Click the arrow for more information on that specific service. And just like that, simple and easy-to-use documentation, available live on OS X Server. You will, of course, need to be online to use it effectively.

September 27th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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We’re going to try using Zendesk’s Help Center feature to manage our help articles. The feature essentially provides a simple CMS for providing support for our fantastic users. If you go to Bushel.com, there is now a link in the header called “Support”. It takes you to support.bushel.com.
Find Out More About Bushel’s New Help Center On The Bushel Blog

June 12th, 2015

Posted In: Bushel

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OS X Yosemite, running the Server app comes complete with lots of awesome features to help you get up and running, started and owning the configuration of Apple Servers. One such is the built-in options to help manage your servers. Open Server, click Help, then click Server Help. You can then search and browse for information about things you’d like to accomplish using the Help Center.

Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 9.53.11 PM

Now, click the arrow for each service for information about configuring that service. You will see an arrow for each service.

Click the arrow for more information on that specific service.

And just like that, simple and easy-to-use documentation, available live on OS X Server. You will, of course, need to be online to use it effectively.

November 3rd, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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The jamf binary comes with a lot of cool little features that you can use to script things quickly, because JAMF has already built things to help you. We’ll look at two really quick. The first is the deleteAccount verb which, surprisingly, deletes accounts. With that verb, you’ll use the -username operator to define a given user that you’d like to remove. That username is defined as the short name (or what dscl shows) of a given user. For example, if I wanted to remove the user rorygilmore, I’d run the following command: /usr/sbin/jamf deleteAccount -username rorygilmore You can then provide a popup on the screen that you completed that action: /usr/sbin/jamf displayMessage -message “rorygilmore has been deleted" You can then add a new user, using the createAccount verb. To do so, run the jamf binary using the createAccount verb. This verb provides for a number of options, including a short name (-username), a full name (-realname), a password (-password), a home directory (-home) and a default shell (-shell). If you want the user to be an admin of the system you can also add an -admin option. Below, we’ll string it all together: /usr/sbin/jamf createAccount -username lorelaigilmore -realname "Lorelai Gilmore" -password lukedanes -home /Users/lorelai -shell bash -admin Unknown When I do this stuff I like to run a quick recon again: /usr/sbin/jamf recon If you have any questions, you can use the help verb to see what all this thing can do: /usr/sbin/jamf help And if you need more information on a given verb, run the help verb followed by the one you need more information on: /usr/sbin/jamf help policy  

October 6th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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