krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The changes in the Server app are pretty minimal in the macOS Server 5.4 version that we’re now looking at. All of the options from previous versions are still there and the dnsconfig command line interface for managing the service are basically unchanged. The DNS service in macOS Server, as with previous versions, is based on bind 9 (BIND 9.9.7-P3 to be exact). This is very much compatible with practically every DNS server in the world, including those hosted on Windows, macOS, Linux and even Zoe-R. The first time you open the DNS Service click on the DNS service in the ADVANCED section of the list of SERVICES.
 
Then, click on the cog wheel icon below the list of records and click on Show All Records.
 
At the Records screen, you’ll now see forward and reverse record information. Click the Edit… button for the Forwarding Servers field. Here, you’ll be able to enter a Forwarders, or DNS servers that resolve names that the server you’re using can’t resolve using its own DNS records.

 

Click the plus sign to enter the IP address of any necessary Forwarders. Enter the IP address of any Forwarding servers, then click OK to save your changes.

 

Once back at the main DNS service control screen, click the Edit… button for Perform lookups for to configure what computers the DNS server you are setting up can use the DNS service that the server is hosting.


At the Perform Lookups screen, provide any additional subnets that should be used. If the server should be accessible by anyone anywhere, just set the “Perform lookups for” field at the DNS service screen to “all clients”.

Managing Records

All you have to do to start the DNS is click on the ON button (if it\u2019s not already started, that is). There\u2019s a chance that you won\u2019t want all of the records that are by default entered into the service. But leave it for now, until we\u2019ve covered what everything is. To list the various types of records:

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All you have to do to start the DNS is click on the ON button (if it’s not already started, that is). There’s a chance that you won’t want all of the records that are by default entered into the service. But leave it for now, until we’ve covered what everything is. Next, click on the cog wheel icon below the records list, and you’ll see a list of all the records and record types that are currently running on the server.

To list the various types of records:

Then, when you click on the plus sign, you can create additional records. Double-clicking on records (including the Zones) brings up a screen to edit the record. The settings for a zone can be seen below.
 

These include the name for the zone. As you can see, a zone was created with the hostname rather than the actual domain name. This is a problem if you wish to have multiple records in your domain that point to the same host name. Theoretically you could create a zone and a machine record for each host in the domain, but the right way to do things is probably going to be to create a zone for the domain name instead of the host name. So for the above zone, the entry should be krypted.com rather than mavserver.krypted.com (the hostname of the computer). Additionally, the TTL (or Time To Live) can be configured, which is referenced here as the “Zone data is valid for” field. If you will be making a lot of changes this value should be as low as possible (the minimum value here is 5 minutes).
“Note: To make sure your zone name and TLD don’t conflict with data that already exists on the Internet, check here to make sure you’re not using a sponsored TLD.” — http://krypted.com/mac-os-x/dont-go-near-there-sponsored-top-level-domain-names/

Note: The above screen has the domain in the zone field and the name of a record, such as www for the zone called, for example, krypted.lan.

Click Done to commit the changes or create the new record. Next, let’s create a MX record for the domain. To create the MX for the domain, click on the plus sign at the list of records.


Select the appropriate zone in the Zone field (if you have multiple zones). Then type the name of the A record that you will be pointing mail to. Most likely, this would be a machine record called simply mail, in this case for krypton.lan, so mail.krypted.lan. If you have multiple MX records, increment the priority number for the lower priority servers.

As a full example, let’s create a zone and some records from scratch. Let’s setup this zone for an Xsan metadata network, called krypted.xsan. Then, let’s create our metadata controller record as starbuck.krypted.xsan to point to 10.0.0.2 and our backup metadata controller record as apollo.krypted.xsan which points to 10.0.0.3. First, click on the plus sign and select Add Primary Zone.


At the zone screen, enter the name of the domain you’re setting up (e.g. krypted.com, also known as the zone), check the box for Allow zone transfers (there will be a second server) and click on the Done button. Click on the plus sign and then click on Add Machine record.


At the New Machine Record screen, select the appropriate zone as the Zone and then enter starbuck as the Host Name and click on the plus sign for IP Addresses and type in the appropriate IP. Click on Done to commit the changes. Repeat the process for each host that needs an address and then click Done to create the records.

Setting Up Secondary Servers

Now let\u2019s setup a secondary server by leveraging a secondary zone running on a second computer. On the second Mountain Lion Server running on the second server, click on the plus sign for the DNS service and select Add Secondary Zone.

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Setting Up Secondary Servers

Now let’s setup a secondary server by leveraging a secondary zone running on a second computer. On the second macOS Server, click on the plus sign for the DNS service and select Add Secondary Zone.



Managing DNS From The Command Line

Now, all of this is pretty straight forward. Create a zone, create some records inside the zone and you\u2019re good to go. But there are a lot of times when DNS just needs a little more than what the Server app can do for you. For example, round robin DNS records, bind views, etc. Therefore, getting used to the command line is going to be pretty helpful for anyone with more than a handful of records. The first thing to know about the DNS command line in OS X Mountain Lion Server is to do everything possible using the serveradmin command. To start the service, use the start option:

","engine":"visual"}” data-block-type=”2″> At the Secondary Zone screen, enter krypted.com as the name of the zone and then the IP address of the DNS server hosting that domain in the Primary Servers field (actually, enter your domain name, not mine). Click Done and the initial zone transfer should begin once the DNS service is turned on (if it hasn’t already been enabled).

Managing DNS From The Command Line

Now, all of this is pretty straight forward. Create a zone, create some records inside the zone and you’re good to go. But there are a lot of times when DNS just needs a little more than what the Server app can do for you. For example, round robin DNS records, bind views, etc. Therefore, getting used to the command line is going to be pretty helpful for anyone with more than a handful of records. The first thing to know about the DNS command line in macOS Server is to do everything possible using the serveradmin command for global management and dnsconfig for record and zone management. Once you start editing configuration files, the user interface can become unstable and other updates may or may not override the updates you make in those configuration files. To start the service, use the start option:

sudo serveradmin start dns
http://krypted.com/?p=45195. In /private/var/named are a collection of each zone the server is configured for. Secondary zones are flat and don’t have a lot of data in them, but primary zones contain all the information in the Server app and the serveradmin outputs. To see the contents of our test zone we created, let’s view the /Library/Server/named/db.krypted.xsan file (each file name is db. followed by the name of the zone):

cat /var/named/db.krypted.xsan
http://krypted.com/mac-os-x-server/os-x-server-forcing-dns-propagation for information on forcing DNS propagation if you are having issues with zone transfers. Finally, you can manage all records within the DNS service using the new /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/DNSManager.framework/dnsconfig command line tool. I’ve written an article on managing DNS using this tool, available here.

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September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Uncategorized

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OS X has a built-in web server called Apache. It’s been there for a long, long time. Once upon a time, you could enable web sharing using System Preferences. This is no longer a feature in the Sharing System Preference pane, but you can actually enable it quicker than you could before. To do so, we’ll use apachectl: /usr/sbin/apachectl start To then stop the web server: /usr/sbin/apachectl stop To see the apache status: /usr/sbin/apachectl status Or: /usr/sbin/apachectl fullstatus The default site is stored in /Library/WebServer/Documents. You can then edit this there, or replace the index.html.en file with a file/hierarchy that you wish to have. Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 10.12.25 AM Enjoy.

December 22nd, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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Web Services in Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Linux and most versions of Unix are provided by Apache, an Open Source project that much of the Internet owes its origins to. Apache owes its name to the fact that it’s “a patchy” service. These patches are often mods, or modules. Configuring web services is as easy in OS X Mavericks Server (10.9) as it has ever been. To set up the default web portal, simply open the Server app, click on the Websites service and click on the ON button. Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.06.28 PMAfter a time, the service will start. Once running, click on the View Server Website link at the bottom of the pane. Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.07.01 PM Provided the stock OS X Server page loads, you are ready to use OS X Server as a web server. Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.07.43 PMBefore we setup custom sites, there are a few things you should know. The first is, the server is no longer really designed to remove the default website. So if you remove the site, your server will exhibit inconsistent behavior. Also, don’t remove the files that comprise the default site. Instead just add sites, which is covered next. Webmail is gone. You don’t have to spend a ton of time looking for it as it isn’t there. Also, Mountain Lion Server added web apps, which we’ll briefly review later in this article as well, as those continue in Mavericks Server.  Finally, enabling PHP and Python on sites is done globally, so this setting applies to all sites hosted on the server. Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 8.04.38 PMNow that we’ve got that out of the way, let’s add our first custom site. Do so by clicking on the plus sign. At the New Web Site pane, you’ll be prompted for a number of options. The most important is the name of the site, with other options including the following: Once you’ve configured all the appropriate options, click on Done to save your changes. The site should then load. Sites are then listed in the list of Websites. The Apache service is most easily managed from the Server app, but there are too many options in Apache to really be able to put into a holistic graphical interface. The easiest way to manage the Websites service in OS X Mavericks server is using the serveradmin command. Apache administrators from other platforms will be tempted to use the apachectl command to restart the Websites service. Instead, use the serveradmin command to do so. To start the service: sudo serveradmin start web To stop the service(s): sudo serveradmin stop web And to see the status: sudo serveradmin fullstatus web Fullstatus returns the following information: web:health = _empty_dictionary web:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1 web:apacheVersion = "2.2" web:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array web:startedTime = "2013-10-08 01:05:32 +0000" web:apacheState = "RUNNING" web:statusMessage = "" web:ApacheMode = 2 web:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO" web:state = "RUNNING" web:setStateVersion = 1 While the health option typically resembles kiosk computers in the Computer Science departments of most major universities, much of the rest of the output can be pretty helpful including the Apache version, whether the service is running, any restrictions on ports and the date/time stamp that the service was started. To see all of the settings available to the serveradmin command, run it, followed by settings and then web, to indicate the Websites service: sudo serveradmin settings web The output is pretty verbose and can be considered in two sections, the first includes global settings across sites as well as the information for the default sites that should not be deleted: web:defaultSite:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default" web:defaultSite:serverName = "" web:defaultSite:realms = _empty_dictionary web:defaultSite:redirects = _empty_array web:defaultSite:enableServerSideIncludes = no web:defaultSite:customLogPath = "&quot;/var/log/apache2/access_log&quot;" web:defaultSite:webApps = _empty_array web:defaultSite:sslCertificateIdentifier = "" web:defaultSite:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = "" web:defaultSite:allowFolderListing = no web:defaultSite:serverAliases = _empty_array web:defaultSite:errorLogPath = "&quot;/var/log/apache2/error_log&quot;" web:defaultSite:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_.conf" web:defaultSite:aliases = _empty_array web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html" web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php" web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/" web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html" web:defaultSite:allowAllOverrides = no web:defaultSite:identifier = "37502141" web:defaultSite:port = 80 web:defaultSite:allowCGIExecution = no web:defaultSite:serverAddress = "*" web:defaultSite:requiresSSL = no web:defaultSite:proxies = _empty_dictionary web:defaultSite:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary web:defaultSecureSite:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default" web:defaultSecureSite:serverName = "" web:defaultSecureSite:realms = _empty_dictionary web:defaultSecureSite:redirects = _empty_array web:defaultSecureSite:enableServerSideIncludes = no web:defaultSecureSite:customLogPath = "&quot;/var/log/apache2/access_log&quot;" web:defaultSecureSite:webApps = _empty_array web:defaultSecureSite:sslCertificateIdentifier = "com.apple.systemdefault.9912650B09DE94ED160146A3996A45EB3E39275B" web:defaultSecureSite:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = "" web:defaultSecureSite:allowFolderListing = no web:defaultSecureSite:serverAliases = _empty_array web:defaultSecureSite:errorLogPath = "&quot;/var/log/apache2/error_log&quot;" web:defaultSecureSite:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_443_.conf" web:defaultSecureSite:aliases = _empty_array web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html" web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php" web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/" web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html" web:defaultSecureSite:allowAllOverrides = no web:defaultSecureSite:identifier = "37502140" web:defaultSecureSite:port = 443 web:defaultSecureSite:allowCGIExecution = no web:defaultSecureSite:serverAddress = "*" web:defaultSecureSite:requiresSSL = yes web:defaultSecureSite:proxies = _empty_dictionary web:defaultSecureSite:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary web:dataLocation = "/Library/Server/Web/Data" web:mainHost:keepAliveTimeout = 15.000000 web:mainHost:maxClients = "50%" The second section is per-site settings, with an array entry for each site: web:customSites:_array_index:0:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com" web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverName = "www2.krypted.com" web:customSites:_array_index:0:realms = _empty_dictionary web:customSites:_array_index:0:redirects = _empty_array web:customSites:_array_index:0:enableServerSideIncludes = no web:customSites:_array_index:0:customLogPath = "/var/log/apache2/access_log" web:customSites:_array_index:0:webApps = _empty_array web:customSites:_array_index:0:sslCertificateIdentifier = "" web:customSites:_array_index:0:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = "" web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowFolderListing = no web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverAliases = _empty_array web:customSites:_array_index:0:errorLogPath = "/var/log/apache2/error_log" web:customSites:_array_index:0:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_www2.krypted.com.conf" web:customSites:_array_index:0:aliases = _empty_array web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html" web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php" web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/" web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html" web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowAllOverrides = no web:customSites:_array_index:0:identifier = "41179886" web:customSites:_array_index:0:port = 80 web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowCGIExecution = no web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverAddress = "*" web:customSites:_array_index:0:requiresSSL = no web:customSites:_array_index:0:proxies = _empty_dictionary web:customSites:_array_index:0:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary The final section (the largest by far) includes array entries for each defined web app. The following shows the entry for a Hello World Python app: web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredWebAppNames = _empty_array web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:includeFiles = _empty_array web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredModuleNames = _empty_array web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:startCommand = "" web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:sslPolicy = 0 web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiresSSL = no web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredByWebAppNames = _empty_array web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:launchKeys:_array_index:0 = "org.postgresql.postgres" web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:proxies = _empty_dictionary web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:preflightCommand = "" web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:stopCommand = "" web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:name = "org.postgresql.postgres" web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:displayName = "" Each site has its own configuration file defined in the array for each section. By default these are stored in the /Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites directory, with /Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_www2.krypted.com.conf being the file for the custom site we created previously. As you can see, many of the options available in the Server app are also available in these files: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www2.krypted.com ServerAdmin admin@example.com DocumentRoot "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com" DirectoryIndex index.html index.php /wiki/ default.html CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access_log combinedvhost ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/error_log <IfModule mod_ssl.c> SSLEngine Off SSLCipherSuite “ALL:!aNULL:!ADH:!eNULL:!LOW:!EXP:RC4+RSA:+HIGH:+MEDIUM” SSLProtocol -ALL +SSLv3 +TLSv1 SSLProxyEngine On SSLProxyProtocol -ALL +SSLv3 +TLSv1 </IfModule> <Directory “/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com”> Options All -Indexes -ExecCGI -Includes +MultiViews AllowOverride None <IfModule mod_dav.c> DAV Off </IfModule> <IfDefine !WEBSERVICE_ON> Deny from all ErrorDocument 403 /customerror/websitesoff403.html </IfDefine> </Directory> </VirtualHost> The serveradmin command can also be used to run commands. For example, to reset the service to factory defaults, delete the configuration files for each site and then run the following command: sudo serveradmin command web:command=restoreFactorySettings The final tip I’m going to give in this article is when to make changes with each app. I strongly recommend making all of your changes in the Server app when possible. When it isn’t, use serveradmin and when you can’t make changes in serveradmin, only then alter the configuration files that come with the operating system by default. I also recommend keeping backups of all configuration files that are altered and a log of what was altered in each, in order to help piece the server back together should it become unconfigured miraculously when a softwareupdate -all is run next.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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There are some commands where you just have to wonder why. Sure, I see what this command does, but why bother? Well, I’m not going to say that xsanadmin is one of those commands, but I’m not going to say that it isn’t. At first glance, you might think that the list, stop, start and other verbs look promising. Like maybe you can actually administer a volume from a much simpler to use command line interface. However, if you want a quick and dirty of what xsanadmin does, look no further than just running the command without any verbs or operators: xsanadmin The result is help information from the serveradmin command: Usage: serveradmin [-dhvx] [list | start | stop | status | fullstatus | settings | command] [<service_key> [ = <value> ]] -h, --help display this message -v, --version display version info -d, --debug print command -x, --xml print output as XML plist Examples: serveradmin list --Lists all services serveradmin start afp --Starts afp server serveradmin stop ftp --Stops ftp server serveradmin status web --Returns current status of the web server serveradmin fullstatus web --Returns more complete status of the web server serveradmin settings afp --Returns all afp configuration parameters serveradmin settings afp:guestAccess --Returns afp guestAccess attribute serveradmin settings afp:guestAccess = yes --Sets afp guestAccess to true serveradmin settings --Takes settings commands like above from stdin serveradmin command afp:command = getConnectedUsers --Used to perform service specific commands serveradmin command --Takes stdin to define generic command that requires other parameters Why’s that? Because all the command is doing is piping information to and from the serveradmin command, thus the verbs are basically the same: list, status, fullstatus, etc. To see which services, let’s pipe settings for all to a file: xsanadmin settings all > xsanadminsettings.txt Here, you’ll notice that you have settings for the xsan/san service, file sharing and info. That’s it. You may be asking yourself, “why did you write this article then?” My answer would be that I’m not really sure. Mostly because I wasted my time trying to see if I could do cool stuff with this command and it turns out I can’t…

October 11th, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Xsan

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iChat Server was sooooo easy to configure. iChat Server is now Messages Server. Both use the open source jabber project as their back-end code base. Lucky us, all Apple did in the latest iteration is change the name of the service in the Server app, leaving the command line effectively untouched. The paths to things serverish have changed. The jabberd binary is now at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/private/var/jabberd and the autobuddy binary is at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/bin/jabber_autobuddy. Given the importance of having multiple binaries that do the same thing, another jabberd binary is also stored at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/jabberd. Note that the man page says it’s in /etc. But I digress. Setting up the Messages service is simple. Open the Server app and click on Messages in the Server app sidebar.

“I brought you some supper but if you’d prefer a lecture, I’ve a few very catchy ones prepped…sin and hellfire… one has man page lepers.”

Once open, click on the checkbox for “Enable server-to-server federation” if you have multiple iChat, er, I mean, Messages servers and then click on the checkbox for “Archive all chat messages” if you’d like transcripts of all Messages sessions that route through the server to be saved on the server. You should use an SSL certificate with the Messages service. If enabling federation so you can have multiple Messages servers, you have to. Before enabling the service, click on the name of the server in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Settings tab. From here, click on Edit for the SSL Certificate (which should be plural btw) entry to bring up a screen to select SSL Certificates.

“Well they tell you: never hit a man with a closed fist. But it is, on occasion, hilarious.”

At the SSL Certificates screen (here it’s plural!), select the certificate the Messages service should use from the available list supplied beside that entry and click on the OK button. If you need to setup federation, click back on the Messages service in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Edit button. Then, click on the checkbox for Require server-to-server federation (making sure each server has the other’s SSL certificate installed) and then choose whether to allow any server to federate with yours or to restrict which servers are allowed. I have always restricted unless I was specifically setting up a server I wanted to be public (like public as in everyone in the world can federate to it, including the gorram reavers that want to wear your skin).

“And I think calling him that is an insult to the psychotic lowlife community.”

To restrict the service, then provide a list of each server address capable of communicating with your server. Once all the servers are entered, click the OK button. Obviously, if you only have one server, you can skip that. Once the settings are as you wish them to be, click on the ON/OFF switch to light up the service. To see the status of the service, once started, use the fullstatus option with serveradmin followed by the jabber indicator: sudo serveradmin fullstatus jabber The output includes whether the service is running, the location of jabber log files, the name of the server as well as the time the service was started, as can be seen here: jabber:state = "RUNNING" jabber:roomsState = "RUNNING" jabber:logPaths:PROXY_LOG = "/private/var/jabberd/log/proxy65.log" jabber:logPaths:MUC_STD_LOG = "/var/log/system.log" jabber:logPaths:JABBER_LOG = "/var/log/system.log" jabber:proxyState = "RUNNING" jabber:currentConnections = "32" jabber:currentConnectionsPort1 = "32" jabber:currentConnectionsPort2 = "0" jabber:pluginVersion = "10.8.177" jabber:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO" jabber:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "kaylee.pretendco.com" jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "kaylee.pretendco.com" jabber:setStateVersion = 1 jabber:startedTime = "2012-08-02 02:53:26 +0000" jabber:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1 There are also a few settings not available in the Server app. One of these that can be important is the port used to communicate between the Messages client and the Messages service on the server. For example, to customize this to 8080, use serveradmin followed by settings and then jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080, as follows: sudo serveradmin settings jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080 To change the location of the saved Messages transcripts (here, we’ll set it to /Volumes/Pegasus/Book: sudo serveradmin settings jabber:savedChatsLocation = "/Volumes/Pegasus/Book" To see a full listing of the options, just run settings with the jabber service: sudo serveradmin settings jabber The output lists each setting configurable jabber:s2sRestrictDomains = no jabber:authLevel = "STANDARD" jabber:savedChatsLocation = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/message_archives" jabber:sslKeyFile = "" jabber:enableXMPP = yes jabber:initialized = yes jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 5223 jabber:sslCAFile = "" jabber:requireSecureS2S = no jabber:savedChatsArchiveInterval = 7 jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "zoe.pretendco.com" jabber:jabberdDatabasePath = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/sqlite/jabberd2.db" jabber:jabberdS2SPort = 5269 jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "zoe.pretendco.com" jabber:jabberdClientPortTLS = 5222 jabber:enableSavedChats = no To stop the service: sudo serveradmin stop jabber And to start it back up: sudo serveradmin start jabber It’s also worth noting something that’s completely missing in this whole thing: Apple Push Notifications… Why is that important? Well, you use the Messages application to communicate not only with Mac OS X and other jabber clients, but you can also use Messages to send text messages. Given that there’s nothing in the server that has anything to do with texts, push or anything of the sort, it’s worth noting that these messages don’t route through the server and therefore still require an iCloud account. Not a huge deal, but worth mentioning that Messages server doesn’t have the same updates built into the Messages app. Because messages don’t traverse the server, there’s no transcripts.
“This is what I do, darlin’. This is what I do.”

August 2nd, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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