krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

OS X has a built-in web server called Apache. It’s been there for a long, long time. Once upon a time, you could enable web sharing using System Preferences. This is no longer a feature in the Sharing System Preference pane, but you can actually enable it quicker than you could before. To do so, we’ll use apachectl:

/usr/sbin/apachectl start

To then stop the web server:

/usr/sbin/apachectl stop

To see the apache status:

/usr/sbin/apachectl status

Or:

/usr/sbin/apachectl fullstatus

The default site is stored in /Library/WebServer/Documents. You can then edit this there, or replace the index.html.en file with a file/hierarchy that you wish to have.

Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 10.12.25 AM

Enjoy.

December 22nd, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , ,

Web Services in Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Linux and most versions of Unix are provided by Apache, an Open Source project that much of the Internet owes its origins to. Apache owes its name to the fact that it’s “a patchy” service. These patches are often mods, or modules. Configuring web services is as easy in OS X Mavericks Server (10.9) as it has ever been. To set up the default web portal, simply open the Server app, click on the Websites service and click on the ON button.

Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.06.28 PMAfter a time, the service will start. Once running, click on the View Server Website link at the bottom of the pane.

Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.07.01 PM

Provided the stock OS X Server page loads, you are ready to use OS X Server as a web server.

Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 7.07.43 PMBefore we setup custom sites, there are a few things you should know. The first is, the server is no longer really designed to remove the default website. So if you remove the site, your server will exhibit inconsistent behavior. Also, don’t remove the files that comprise the default site. Instead just add sites, which is covered next. Webmail is gone. You don’t have to spend a ton of time looking for it as it isn’t there. Also, Mountain Lion Server added web apps, which we’ll briefly review later in this article as well, as those continue in Mavericks Server.  Finally, enabling PHP and Python on sites is done globally, so this setting applies to all sites hosted on the server.

Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 8.04.38 PMNow that we’ve got that out of the way, let’s add our first custom site. Do so by clicking on the plus sign. At the New Web Site pane, you’ll be prompted for a number of options. The most important is the name of the site, with other options including the following:

  • Domain Name: The name the site is accessible from. The default sites do not have this option as they are accessible from all names that resolve to the server.
  • IP Address: The IP address the site listens on. Any means the site is available from every IP address the server is configured to use. The default websites do not have this option as they are accessible from all addresses automatically
  • Port: By default, sites without SSL run on port 80 on all network interfaces, and sites with SSL run on port 443 on all network interfaces. Use the Port field to use custom ports (e.g., 8080). The default sites do not have this option as they are configured to use 80 and 443 for default and SSL-based communications respectively.
  • SSL Certificate: Loads a list of SSL certificates installed using Keychain or the SSL Certificate option in the Settings pane of the Server application
  • Store Site Files In: The directory that the files that comprise the website are stored in. These can be placed into the correct directory using file shares or copying using the Finder. Click on the drop-down menu and then select Other to browse to the directory files are stored in.
  • Who Can Access: By default Anyone (all users, including unauthenticated guests) can access the contents of sites. Clicking on Anyone and then Customize… brings up the “Restrict access to the following folders to a chosen group” screen, where you can choose web directories and then define groups of users who can access the contents.
  • Additional Domains: Click on the Edit… button to bring up a simple list of domain names the the site also responds for (e.g. in addition to krypted.com, add www.krypted.com).
  • Redirects: Click on the Edit… button to bring up a list of redirects within the site. This allows configuring redirects to other sites. For example, use /en to load english.krypted.com or /cn to load china.krypted.com).
  • Aliases: Click on the Edit… button to load a list of aliases. This allows configuring redirects to folders within the same server. For example, /en loads /Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default
  • Index Files: Click on the Edit… button to bring up a list of pages that are loaded when a page isn’t directly indicated. For example, when visiting krypted.com, load the wp.php page by default.
  • Advanced Options: The remaining options are available by clicking on the “Edit Advanced Settings…” button.
  • Enable Server Side Includes: Allows administrators to configure leveraging includes in web files, so that pieces of code can be used across multiple pages in sites.
  • Allow overrides using .htaccess files: Using a .htaccess file allows administrators to define who is able to access a given directory, defining custom user names and passwords in the hidden .htaccess file. These aren’t usually required in an OS X Server web environment as local and directory-based accounts can be used for such operations. This setting enables using custom .htaccess files instead of relying on Apple’s stock web permissions.
  • Allow folder listing: Enables folder listings on directories of a site that don’t have an Index File (described in the non-Advanced settings earlier).
  • Allow CGI execution: Enables CGI scripts for the domain being configured.
  • Use custom error page: Allows administrators to define custom error pages, such as those annoying 404 error pages that load when a page can’t be found
  • Make these web apps available on this website: A somewhat advanced setting, loads items into the webapps array, which can be viewed using the following command:  sudo serveradmin settings web:definedWebApps

Once you’ve configured all the appropriate options, click on Done to save your changes. The site should then load. Sites are then listed in the list of Websites.

The Apache service is most easily managed from the Server app, but there are too many options in Apache to really be able to put into a holistic graphical interface. The easiest way to manage the Websites service in OS X Mavericks server is using the serveradmin command. Apache administrators from other platforms will be tempted to use the apachectl command to restart the Websites service. Instead, use the serveradmin command to do so. To start the service:

sudo serveradmin start web

To stop the service(s):

sudo serveradmin stop web

And to see the status:

sudo serveradmin fullstatus web

Fullstatus returns the following information:

web:health = _empty_dictionary
web:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1
web:apacheVersion = "2.2"
web:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
web:startedTime = "2013-10-08 01:05:32 +0000"
web:apacheState = "RUNNING"
web:statusMessage = ""
web:ApacheMode = 2
web:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
web:state = "RUNNING"
web:setStateVersion = 1

While the health option typically resembles kiosk computers in the Computer Science departments of most major universities, much of the rest of the output can be pretty helpful including the Apache version, whether the service is running, any restrictions on ports and the date/time stamp that the service was started.

To see all of the settings available to the serveradmin command, run it, followed by settings and then web, to indicate the Websites service:

sudo serveradmin settings web

The output is pretty verbose and can be considered in two sections, the first includes global settings across sites as well as the information for the default sites that should not be deleted:

web:defaultSite:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default"
web:defaultSite:serverName = ""
web:defaultSite:realms = _empty_dictionary
web:defaultSite:redirects = _empty_array
web:defaultSite:enableServerSideIncludes = no
web:defaultSite:customLogPath = ""/var/log/apache2/access_log""
web:defaultSite:webApps = _empty_array
web:defaultSite:sslCertificateIdentifier = ""
web:defaultSite:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = ""
web:defaultSite:allowFolderListing = no
web:defaultSite:serverAliases = _empty_array
web:defaultSite:errorLogPath = ""/var/log/apache2/error_log""
web:defaultSite:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_.conf"
web:defaultSite:aliases = _empty_array
web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html"
web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php"
web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/"
web:defaultSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html"
web:defaultSite:allowAllOverrides = no
web:defaultSite:identifier = "37502141"
web:defaultSite:port = 80
web:defaultSite:allowCGIExecution = no
web:defaultSite:serverAddress = "*"
web:defaultSite:requiresSSL = no
web:defaultSite:proxies = _empty_dictionary
web:defaultSite:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary
web:defaultSecureSite:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/Default"
web:defaultSecureSite:serverName = ""
web:defaultSecureSite:realms = _empty_dictionary
web:defaultSecureSite:redirects = _empty_array
web:defaultSecureSite:enableServerSideIncludes = no
web:defaultSecureSite:customLogPath = ""/var/log/apache2/access_log""
web:defaultSecureSite:webApps = _empty_array
web:defaultSecureSite:sslCertificateIdentifier = "com.apple.systemdefault.9912650B09DE94ED160146A3996A45EB3E39275B"
web:defaultSecureSite:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = ""
web:defaultSecureSite:allowFolderListing = no
web:defaultSecureSite:serverAliases = _empty_array
web:defaultSecureSite:errorLogPath = ""/var/log/apache2/error_log""
web:defaultSecureSite:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_443_.conf"
web:defaultSecureSite:aliases = _empty_array
web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html"
web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php"
web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/"
web:defaultSecureSite:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html"
web:defaultSecureSite:allowAllOverrides = no
web:defaultSecureSite:identifier = "37502140"
web:defaultSecureSite:port = 443
web:defaultSecureSite:allowCGIExecution = no
web:defaultSecureSite:serverAddress = "*"
web:defaultSecureSite:requiresSSL = yes
web:defaultSecureSite:proxies = _empty_dictionary
web:defaultSecureSite:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary
web:dataLocation = "/Library/Server/Web/Data"
web:mainHost:keepAliveTimeout = 15.000000
web:mainHost:maxClients = "50%"

The second section is per-site settings, with an array entry for each site:

web:customSites:_array_index:0:documentRoot = "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverName = "www2.krypted.com"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:realms = _empty_dictionary
web:customSites:_array_index:0:redirects = _empty_array
web:customSites:_array_index:0:enableServerSideIncludes = no
web:customSites:_array_index:0:customLogPath = "/var/log/apache2/access_log"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:webApps = _empty_array
web:customSites:_array_index:0:sslCertificateIdentifier = ""
web:customSites:_array_index:0:fullSiteRedirectToOtherSite = ""
web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowFolderListing = no
web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverAliases = _empty_array
web:customSites:_array_index:0:errorLogPath = "/var/log/apache2/error_log"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:fileName = "/Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_www2.krypted.com.conf"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:aliases = _empty_array
web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:0 = "index.html"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:1 = "index.php"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:2 = "/wiki/"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:directoryIndexes:_array_index:3 = "default.html"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowAllOverrides = no
web:customSites:_array_index:0:identifier = "41179886"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:port = 80
web:customSites:_array_index:0:allowCGIExecution = no
web:customSites:_array_index:0:serverAddress = "*"
web:customSites:_array_index:0:requiresSSL = no
web:customSites:_array_index:0:proxies = _empty_dictionary
web:customSites:_array_index:0:errorDocuments = _empty_dictionary

The final section (the largest by far) includes array entries for each defined web app. The following shows the entry for a Hello World Python app:

web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredWebAppNames = _empty_array
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:includeFiles = _empty_array
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredModuleNames = _empty_array
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:startCommand = ""
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:sslPolicy = 0
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiresSSL = no
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:requiredByWebAppNames = _empty_array
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:launchKeys:_array_index:0 = "org.postgresql.postgres"
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:proxies = _empty_dictionary
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:preflightCommand = ""
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:stopCommand = ""
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:name = "org.postgresql.postgres"
web:definedWebApps:_array_index:20:displayName = ""

Each site has its own configuration file defined in the array for each section. By default these are stored in the /Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites directory, with /Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/sites/0000_any_80_www2.krypted.com.conf being the file for the custom site we created previously. As you can see, many of the options available in the Server app are also available in these files:

<VirtualHost *:80>
ServerName www2.krypted.com
ServerAdmin admin@example.com
DocumentRoot "/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com"
DirectoryIndex index.html index.php /wiki/ default.html
CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access_log combinedvhost
ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/error_log

<IfModule mod_ssl.c>
SSLEngine Off
SSLCipherSuite “ALL:!aNULL:!ADH:!eNULL:!LOW:!EXP:RC4+RSA:+HIGH:+MEDIUM”
SSLProtocol -ALL +SSLv3 +TLSv1
SSLProxyEngine On
SSLProxyProtocol -ALL +SSLv3 +TLSv1
</IfModule>

<Directory “/Library/Server/Web/Data/Sites/www2.krypted.com”>
Options All -Indexes -ExecCGI -Includes +MultiViews
AllowOverride None
<IfModule mod_dav.c>
DAV Off
</IfModule>
<IfDefine !WEBSERVICE_ON>
Deny from all
ErrorDocument 403 /customerror/websitesoff403.html
</IfDefine>
</Directory>

</VirtualHost>

The serveradmin command can also be used to run commands. For example, to reset the service to factory defaults, delete the configuration files for each site and then run the following command:

sudo serveradmin command web:command=restoreFactorySettings

The final tip I’m going to give in this article is when to make changes with each app. I strongly recommend making all of your changes in the Server app when possible. When it isn’t, use serveradmin and when you can’t make changes in serveradmin, only then alter the configuration files that come with the operating system by default. I also recommend keeping backups of all configuration files that are altered and a log of what was altered in each, in order to help piece the server back together should it become unconfigured miraculously when a softwareupdate -all is run next.

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There are some commands where you just have to wonder why. Sure, I see what this command does, but why bother? Well, I’m not going to say that xsanadmin is one of those commands, but I’m not going to say that it isn’t. At first glance, you might think that the list, stop, start and other verbs look promising. Like maybe you can actually administer a volume from a much simpler to use command line interface. However, if you want a quick and dirty of what xsanadmin does, look no further than just running the command without any verbs or operators:

xsanadmin

The result is help information from the serveradmin command:

Usage: serveradmin [-dhvx] [list | start | stop | status | fullstatus | settings | command] [<service_key> [ = <value> ]]
-h, --help display this message
-v, --version display version info
-d, --debug print command
-x, --xml print output as XML plist
Examples:
serveradmin list
--Lists all services
serveradmin start afp
--Starts afp server
serveradmin stop ftp
--Stops ftp server
serveradmin status web
--Returns current status of the web server
serveradmin fullstatus web
--Returns more complete status of the web server
serveradmin settings afp
--Returns all afp configuration parameters
serveradmin settings afp:guestAccess
--Returns afp guestAccess attribute
serveradmin settings afp:guestAccess = yes
--Sets afp guestAccess to true
serveradmin settings
--Takes settings commands like above from stdin
serveradmin command afp:command = getConnectedUsers
--Used to perform service specific commands
serveradmin command
--Takes stdin to define generic command that requires other parameters

Why’s that? Because all the command is doing is piping information to and from the serveradmin command, thus the verbs are basically the same: list, status, fullstatus, etc. To see which services, let’s pipe settings for all to a file:

xsanadmin settings all > xsanadminsettings.txt

Here, you’ll notice that you have settings for the xsan/san service, file sharing and info. That’s it. You may be asking yourself, “why did you write this article then?” My answer would be that I’m not really sure. Mostly because I wasted my time trying to see if I could do cool stuff with this command and it turns out I can’t…

October 11th, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Xsan

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

iChat Server was sooooo easy to configure. iChat Server is now Messages Server. Both use the open source jabber project as their back-end code base. Lucky us, all Apple did in the latest iteration is change the name of the service in the Server app, leaving the command line effectively untouched. The paths to things serverish have changed. The jabberd binary is now at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/private/var/jabberd and the autobuddy binary is at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/bin/jabber_autobuddy. Given the importance of having multiple binaries that do the same thing, another jabberd binary is also stored at /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/jabberd. Note that the man page says it’s in /etc. But I digress.

Setting up the Messages service is simple. Open the Server app and click on Messages in the Server app sidebar.

“I brought you some supper but if you’d prefer a lecture, I’ve a few very catchy ones prepped…sin and hellfire… one has man page lepers.”

Once open, click on the checkbox for “Enable server-to-server federation” if you have multiple iChat, er, I mean, Messages servers and then click on the checkbox for “Archive all chat messages” if you’d like transcripts of all Messages sessions that route through the server to be saved on the server. You should use an SSL certificate with the Messages service. If enabling federation so you can have multiple Messages servers, you have to. Before enabling the service, click on the name of the server in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Settings tab. From here, click on Edit for the SSL Certificate (which should be plural btw) entry to bring up a screen to select SSL Certificates.

“Well they tell you: never hit a man with a closed fist. But it is, on occasion, hilarious.”

At the SSL Certificates screen (here it’s plural!), select the certificate the Messages service should use from the available list supplied beside that entry and click on the OK button. If you need to setup federation, click back on the Messages service in the sidebar of Server app and then click on the Edit button. Then, click on the checkbox for Require server-to-server federation (making sure each server has the other’s SSL certificate installed) and then choose whether to allow any server to federate with yours or to restrict which servers are allowed. I have always restricted unless I was specifically setting up a server I wanted to be public (like public as in everyone in the world can federate to it, including the gorram reavers that want to wear your skin).

“And I think calling him that is an insult to the psychotic lowlife community.”

To restrict the service, then provide a list of each server address capable of communicating with your server. Once all the servers are entered, click the OK button.

Obviously, if you only have one server, you can skip that. Once the settings are as you wish them to be, click on the ON/OFF switch to light up the service. To see the status of the service, once started, use the fullstatus option with serveradmin followed by the jabber indicator:

sudo serveradmin fullstatus jabber

The output includes whether the service is running, the location of jabber log files, the name of the server as well as the time the service was started, as can be seen here:

jabber:state = "RUNNING"
jabber:roomsState = "RUNNING"
jabber:logPaths:PROXY_LOG = "/private/var/jabberd/log/proxy65.log"
jabber:logPaths:MUC_STD_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:logPaths:JABBER_LOG = "/var/log/system.log"
jabber:proxyState = "RUNNING"
jabber:currentConnections = "32"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort1 = "32"
jabber:currentConnectionsPort2 = "0"
jabber:pluginVersion = "10.8.177"
jabber:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
jabber:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "kaylee.pretendco.com"
jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "kaylee.pretendco.com"
jabber:setStateVersion = 1
jabber:startedTime = "2012-08-02 02:53:26 +0000"
jabber:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1

There are also a few settings not available in the Server app. One of these that can be important is the port used to communicate between the Messages client and the Messages service on the server. For example, to customize this to 8080, use serveradmin followed by settings and then jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080, as follows:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 8080

To change the location of the saved Messages transcripts (here, we’ll set it to /Volumes/Pegasus/Book:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber:savedChatsLocation = "/Volumes/Pegasus/Book"

To see a full listing of the options, just run settings with the jabber service:

sudo serveradmin settings jabber

The output lists each setting configurable

jabber:s2sRestrictDomains = no
jabber:authLevel = "STANDARD"
jabber:savedChatsLocation = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/message_archives"
jabber:sslKeyFile = ""
jabber:enableXMPP = yes
jabber:initialized = yes
jabber:jabberdClientPortSSL = 5223
jabber:sslCAFile = ""
jabber:requireSecureS2S = no
jabber:savedChatsArchiveInterval = 7
jabber:hostsCommaDelimitedString = "zoe.pretendco.com"
jabber:jabberdDatabasePath = "/Library/Server/Messages/Data/sqlite/jabberd2.db"
jabber:jabberdS2SPort = 5269
jabber:hosts:_array_index:0 = "zoe.pretendco.com"
jabber:jabberdClientPortTLS = 5222
jabber:enableSavedChats = no

To stop the service:

sudo serveradmin stop jabber

And to start it back up:

sudo serveradmin start jabber

It’s also worth noting something that’s completely missing in this whole thing: Apple Push Notifications… Why is that important? Well, you use the Messages application to communicate not only with Mac OS X and other jabber clients, but you can also use Messages to send text messages. Given that there’s nothing in the server that has anything to do with texts, push or anything of the sort, it’s worth noting that these messages don’t route through the server and therefore still require an iCloud account. Not a huge deal, but worth mentioning that Messages server doesn’t have the same updates built into the Messages app. Because messages don’t traverse the server, there’s no transcripts.

“This is what I do, darlin’. This is what I do.”

August 2nd, 2012

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,