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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Last week, Apple finally shipped my new HomePod (and by finally, I mean exactly when they said they would). And setting it up couldn’t have been easier. Even easier than setting up my first Echos. So here’s the deal. Plug in the HomePod and then when it boots up you’ll see an overlay on an iOS device (iPhone, iPad, etc). You’ll want to use the device that has an AppleID you want to use on the HomePod (e.g. the one that your Apple Music account is using). When you see the Set Up button, tap it.



You can then select a location for the HomePod. This is important mostly if you’re going to have multiple HomePods around. Select a location and then tap Continue.



At the Personal Requests screen, tap Enable Personal Requests if you want the device to allow access to your iCloud account for things like, sending a message (note: unintended consequences include but are not limited to children deleting bad report cards, adding weird items to the grocery list, and sending messages from one parent to the other).



At the Terms and Conditions screen, tap Agree if you agree to the terms; otherwise put the device back in the box and return it.



At the Accounts and Settings screen, you can transfer settings to the HomePad, which gives the HomePod access to the wi-fi password for your network (so your phone doesn’t have to be close to the HomePod for it to work).



Next, you need to ask Siri a question.



I recommend asking “Siri, how are you today?”



Once configured, you can go to Settings and AppleID to see the HomePod.



From there, you can see the model, version, serial, and if you happened to configure the HomePod to work with the wrong AppleID, you can tap Remove from Account to be able to configure the device with a different account.



And finally, open the Home device and you’ll see your device. 



From there, tap on the device and you’ll have a few more settings for how the HomePod works with the Home app. Here, you can change the room, change the AppleID, choose to include in the Favorites of your home screen, and disable access to Explicit Content. 



Scroll down and you can choose to share HomePod Analytics. Notice that this is opt-in and they’re clear about how they’ll use it if you enable it. 



So the setup is simple. I’ll have another article for configuring some home automations, so you can control them with the HomePod.

February 12th, 2018

Posted In: Home Automation, iPhone

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One Comment

When running commands that are going to take awhile, I frequently start them with the nohup command, disown the command from the current session or queue them for later execution. The reason is that if I’m running them from a Terminal or SSH session and the session is broken I want to make sure they complete. To schedule a job for later execution, use at. For example, if I want to perform a simple command, I can schedule it in a minute by running it as an echo piped to at: echo "goldengirlsfix.sh" | at now + 2 minutes Note, if using 1 minute, you’ll need that to be singular. But you can also disown the job. To do so, end a command with an & symbol. So, running a command or script that will take awhile with an ampersand at the end displays the job number for the command and then you can disown it by running disown followed by -h at the end. for example: du -d 0 & disown -h If you choose not to disown the job, you can check running jobs using the jobs command at any time: jobs Nohup runs a command or script in the background even after a shell has been stopped: nohup cvfsck -nv goldengirls & The above command runs the command between nohup and the & symbol in the background. By default, you’ll then have the output to the command run in the nohup.out file in your home directory. So if your username were krypted, you could tail the output using the following command: tail -f /Users/krypted/nohup.out You can also use screen and then reconnect to that screen. For example, use screen with a -t to create a new screen: screen -t sanconfigchange Then run a command: xsanctl sanConfigChanged Then later, reconnect to your screen: screen -x And you can control-n or control-a to scroll through running background processes this way, provided each is in its own screen. Finally, in AIX you can actually use the bg command. I used to really like this as I could basically move an existing job into the background if I’d already invoked it from a screen/session. For example, you have pid 88909 running and you want to put it into the background. You can just run bg 88909 and throw it into the background, allowing you to close a tty. But then if you’d like to look at it later, you can always pop it back using, you guessed it, fg. This only worked in AIX really, but is a great process management tool.

January 6th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Ubuntu, Unix, VMware, Xsan

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