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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

There are two useful commands when scripting operations that involve filenames and paths. The first of these is dirname: dirname can be used to return the directory portion of a path. The second is basename: basename can be used to output the file name portion of a path.

For our first example, let’s say that we have an output of /users/krypted, which we know to be the original short name of my user. To just see just that username, we could use basename to call it:

basename /users/charlesedge

Basename can also be used to trim output. For example, let’s say there was a document called myresume.pdf in my home folder and we wanted to grab that without the file extension. We could run basename using the -s option, followed by the string at the end that we do not want to see to output of (the file extension:

basename -s .pdf /users/charlesedge/myresume.pdf

The dirname command is even more basic. It outputs the directory portion of the file’s path. For example, based on the same string, the following would tell you what directory the user is in:

dirname /users/charlesedge

A great example of when this gets more useful is keying off of currently active data. For example, if we’re scripting a make operation, we can use the which command to get an output that just contains the path to the make binary:

which make

We can then wrap that for expansion and grab just the place that the active make binary is stored:

dirname `which make`

This allows us to key other operations off the path of an object. A couple of notable example of this is home or homeDirectory paths and then breaking up data coming into a script via a positional parameter (e.g. $1).

You can also use variables as well. Let’s say that

homedir=/users/krypted ; dirname $homedir

Finally, keep in mind that dirname is relative, so if you’re calling it for ~/ then you’ll see the output at that relative path.

April 5th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Simple request: Search for all files in a directory and the child directories for a specific pattern and then return the filename without the path to the file. There are a few commandlets we end up needing to use:

  • Get-ChildItem: Creates a recursive array of filenames and pipes that output into the For loop.
  • ForEach-Object: Starts a for loop, looping through the output of the command that has been piped into the loop (much easier than an IFS array IMHO).
  • If: This starts the if pattern that ends after the select-string in the below command, but only dumps the $_.PSPath if the pattern is true.
  • Select-String: Searches for the content in the file.
  • Split-Path: This is the Powershell equivalent of basename and dirname. You can use this commandlet to extract parts of the path to a file. In this case, we’ll use the -Leaf option which effectively runs the basename, or just the file name in the path to a file.

Get-ChildItem -include * -recurse | ForEach-Object { if( ( $(Get-Content $_) | select-string -pattern "Finished processing mailbox") ) { $_.PSPath }} | Split-Path -Leaf

You can also search for the files that specifically don’t have that given pattern included in them instead by adding a ! in front of the Get-Content:

Get-ChildItem -include * -recurse | ForEach-Object { if( !( $(Get-Content $_) | select-string -pattern "Finished processing mailbox") ) { $_.PSPath }} | Split-Path -Leaf

Note: This runs recursively from the existing working directory (and yes, you can use pwd to return a path, just like the bash built-in).

Finally, the > operator can then be placed into the end to dump our data to a file:

Get-ChildItem -include * -recurse | ForEach-Object { if( !( $(Get-Content $_) | select-string -pattern "Finished processing mailbox") ) { $_.PSPath }} | Split-Path -Leaf > Complete.txt

 

April 18th, 2014

Posted In: Active Directory, Microsoft Exchange Server, Windows Server

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OS X Mavericks Server (Server 3) comes with the /usr/sbin/serverinfo command (introduced in Mountain Lion Server). The serverinfo command is useful when programmatically obtaining information about the very basic state of an Apple Server.

The first option indicates whether the Server app has been downloaded from the app store, which is the –software option:

serverinfo --software

When used, this option reports the following if the Server.app can be found:

This system has server software installed.

Or if the software cannot be found, the following is indicated:

This system does NOT have server software installed.

The –productname option determines the name of the software app:

serverinfo --productname

If you change the name of the app from Server then the server info command won’t work any longer, so the output should always be the following:

Server

The –shortversion command returns the version of the Server app being used:

serverinfo --shortversion

The output will not indicate a build number, but instead the version of the app on the computer the command is run on:

2.2.67

To see the build number (which should iterate with each update to the Server app from the Mac App Store, use the –buildversion option:

serverinfo --buildversion

The output shows the build of server, which doesn’t necessarily match the OS X build number:

13S411

Just because the Server app has been downloaded doesn’t mean the Server setup assistant has been run. To see if it has, use the –configured option:

serverinfo --configured

The output indicates whether the system is running as a server or just has the app installed (e.g. if you’re using it to connect to another server:

This system has server software configured.

You can also output all of the information into a single, easy to script against property list using the –plist option:

serverinfo --plist

The output is a list of each of the other options used:



IsOSXServerVolume IsOSXServerVolumeConfigured IsServerHardware

LocalizedServerProductName
Server
ServerBuildVersion
13S411
ServerPerformanceModeEnabled

ServerVersion
2.2.67

The Server Root can reside in a number of places. To see the path (useful when scripting commands that are relative to the ServerRoot:

serverinfo –prefix

By default, the output is as follows, which is basically like a dirname of the ServerRoot:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot

You can also see whether the system is running on actual hardware desgnated by Apple for servers using the –hardware option:

serverinfo --hardware

The output simply indicates if the hardware shipped with OS X Server on it from Apple:

This system is NOT running on server hardware.

The –perfmode option indicates whether or not the performance mode has been enabled, dedicating resources to binaries within the Server app:

serverinfo --perfmode

If the performance mode has not been enabled then the output will be as such:

Server performance mode is NOT enabled.

To enable performance mode, you can also use serverinfo. This is the only task that the command does that can make any changes to the system and as such is the only time you need to elevate privileges:

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 1

Or set the boolean value back to 0 to disable.

sudo serverinfo —setperfmode 0

October 22nd, 2013

Posted In: Mac OS X Server

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There are two commands that can be really helpful when scripting operations that involve filenames and paths. The first of these is dirname: dirname can be used to return the directory portion of a path. The second is basename: basename can be used to output the file name portion of a path.

For our first example, let’s say that we have an output of /var/db/shadow/hash/850F62CD-966C-43A7-9C66-9F9E6799A955, which we know contains the encrypted password for a given user. To just see the UUID here would be done using the following extremely basic incantation of basename:

basename /var/db/shadow/hash/850F62CD-966C-43A7-9C66-9F9E6799A955

Basename can also be used to trim output. For example, let’s say we didn’t need the final portion of the above filename in our output. We could run basename using the -s option, followed by the string at the end that we do not want to see to output of just the first 4 sections:

basename -s -9F9E6799A955 /var/db/shadow/hash/850F62CD-966C-43A7-9C66-9F9E6799A955

The dirname command is even more basic. It outputs the directory portion of the file’s path. For example, based on the same string, the following would tell you what directory the UUID files with the passwords are stored in:

dirname /var/db/shadow/hash/850F62CD-966C-43A7-9C66-9F9E6799A955

A great example of when this gets more useful is keying off of currently active data. For example, if we’re scripting a make operation, we can use the which command to get an output that just contains the path to the make binary:

which make

We can then wrap that for expansion and grab just the place that the active make binary is stored:

dirname `which make`

This allows us to key other operations off the path of an object. A couple of notable example of this is home or homeDirectory paths and then breaking up data coming into a script via a positional parameter (e.g. $1).

May 27th, 2011

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mass Deployment, Ubuntu, Unix

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