krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted):

smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted

When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported. Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares:

smbutil statshares -a

You’ll then see the SHARE, ATTRIBUTE TYPE, and VALUE for each share mounted. Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb to the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow.

September 26th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted): smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported. Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares: smbutil statshares -a Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb for the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow. Other verbs for smbutil include lookup, status, view, and identity. All are very helpful in troubleshooting connections to smb targets.

November 7th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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DFS stands for Distributed File Sharing. DFS is most commonly used to virtualize the way with which storage is presented to users. Once virtualized, mounts are able to replicate to one another or be moved between servers without impacting the end user experience. While many who have never used DFS will wonder why enterprises actually care about it, those of us who have used it extensively will be stoked that this new feature has been incorporated into OS X Lion. Using DFS in OS X is similar to using DFS in Windows, simply connect to a share and the work on the back end to locate where the share is actually stored is done on the server. Use Command-K (or Connect to Server from the Go menu) to bring up the Connect to Server dialog box. Enter the name of the server. You’ll be presented with a list of shares. Pick one and viola, you’re using DFS. The ease of use is why people like it. Well, that and the replication… Now, connecting to DFS is sure to be rife with problems. For troubleshooting, Apple has provided the wonderful smbutil from Valentines Day 2000 (ya’, it’s that old). smbutil comes complete with a dfs command that can be used to lookup dfs referrals. Use smbutil followed by the dfs command and then a url to check roots and links. For example, let’s say we have a box called myDFSbox.krypted.com. And let’s say that myDFSbox has a root called losangeles and a link called engineering. The command to check the referrals would be: smbutil dfs smb://myDFSbox.krypted.com/losangeles/engineering You can also inject the username and password for the domain between the protocol (smb://) and the host name (myDFSbox.krypted.com). While smbutil is helpful, I haven’t yet run into any issues where OS X didn’t enumerate the DFS environment on its own. But then, it is new and so there’s plenty of time to find issues.

July 20th, 2011

Posted In: Active Directory, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mass Deployment, Windows Server

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This month, for MacTech Magazine, I wrote an article called “Implementing File & Print Services on Windows Servers for Mac OS X Clients.” The article, written with the Enterprise Desktop Alliance, focuses again on replacing Xserve hardware in rack dense environments with services running on Windows. In this article I focused on ExtremeZ-IP and using Centrify to publish shares as automounts. It’s another step in a step-by-step technical approach at deploying Mac OS X clients in Windows environments. Hope you enjoy!

March 10th, 2011

Posted In: Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Windows Server

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The first task that you will complete setting up any WIndows Server 2008 is to set up a Server Role. To do so, open Server Manager and click on Add Roles. At the Add Roles Wizard, click on the Next button to show a list of roles to add. Check the box for File Services and click on the Next button. Click on Next again. At the Select Role Services screen, you’ll see that File Server is checked. This will install the SMB/CIFS services. You’ll also see Distributed File System. Check the box for Distributed File System and the then check the boxes for DFS Namespaces if you want to setup shared folders that spread across multiple servers. You can enable DFS Replication if you need to configure name spaces that get synchronized between multiple servers. When you’re comfortable that you’ve enabled the services required, click on Next. At the Create a DFS Namespace screen, you can go ahead and create your first namespace. To do so, provide a name for the namespace and click on Next. At the Namespace Type screen, click on Domain-based namespace (or if you will be using only the one server go ahead and click on Stand-alone namespace). Note the Namespace preview. This is the path that you will use to connect to the DFS namespace from client systems. Click Next and then at the Namespace Configuration screen, click on Add and then click on Browse to select a folder to be shared. If you do not yet have a shared folder then click on New Shared Folder. At the Create Share screen, provide the path and the permissions for the folder as you would most shares. If you already have existing shares then select the share which will be used to provide the DFS namespace and click on OK. Back at the Add folder to Namespace screen, verify the information appears correct and click on OK. Now you’ll be back at the Namespace Configuration screen. Here, you’ll see the namespace that is presented to users and below it you will see the share point that you created, which will appear to users as a subfolder of the namespace. Provided that you have DFS installed on a second server you can then add a shared directory from that server as yet another subfolder of the namespace. Otherwise, click on the Next button, then verify the settings and click Install. When the installation is complete, click Close. From Administrative Tools, click on DFS Management. Here, you can use the wizard to publish namespaces to multiple servers for replication, configure the backup services for DFS and perform a variety of other wizardly types of tasks. But more importantly, you can click on Namespaces and configure additional shared folders to be added to the namespace and additional servers.

September 4th, 2009

Posted In: Windows Server

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GroupLogic announced that Extreme Z-IP would have support for DFS in Q1 2009. Well, close enough – Release Candidate 3 can now be downloaded for testing.

April 4th, 2009

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mass Deployment, Windows Server

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