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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

There are a number of ways that you can protect your WordPress site from spam bots. The first is to only allow authenticated users to post comments. Doing so can still be a bit unwieldy, but this feature is built into WordPress and so pretty straight forward to use. Some, who deal with large amounts of spam bots then choose to completely disable the commenting feature outright (Settings -> Discussion -> Uncheck Allow people to post comments on new articles), but comments can still be made on existing articles and commentary is one of the best features of WordPress for many. To stop comments on older articles, also disable commenting on older articles (same page but also choose the Automatically close comments on articles older than option as well). No site should have to disable comments or bend to the will of a spam bot. You can also then choose (same page again) to email the administrator when a comment is made and then choose to not publish comments until the administrator approves them. But spam bots will still attack, and now you’ll just get a ton of junk email. So many will turn to plug-ins for WordPress. There are a few of those that I like a lot. One is called Invisible Defender. Invisible Defender adds a couple of fields that are suppressed using the style sheets. These invisible comment fields, because they’re not displayed to a browser should then never be filled out. Therefore, if a field is filled out, it had to have been done by a bot. Those comments are then automatically blocked. Then there’s the ability to force captcha (shows you funny garbled letters and you type them into a verify field). Captcha for account creation means that all but the most sophisticated bots will fail. This form of forcing an additional form of verification that a visitor is a real human can then be circumvented by users of OpenID, FaceBook and other services, using plug-ins that allow those users to be authenticated through the third party (typically requires a little theme customization). Then there are the antispambee and akismet plug-ins, which look at the actual comments and attempt to determine which ones are spam. These make a good layer of defense but should not be the only layer used. Regrettably, any time you have user generated content on a web site you are going to have automated bots attempting to do a number of things, most likely sell black market pharmaceuticals and other items of questionable origin. There are also bots that attempt to exploit the login page of the WordPress admin (<DOMAIN>/wp-admin.php or /wp-login.php. These are defeated an entirely different way. One of the best strategies is to lock out those who have attempted a number of invalid attempts that exceeds a threshold that you define. ¬†Amongst those is Login Lockdown WordPress Security. Another layer for protecting the administrative side of the site is to add an .htaccess file to provide an additional layer of security on top of WordPress. You can also change the URLs of your login page, which I usually use a plug-in called Stealth Login for. Finally, I like to back up WordPress in an automated fashion. There are a lot of plug-ins to do this, but I’ve always used WordPress Database Backup. Why? Because it works every time I tested it. I haven’t even bothered to test a good backup and restore for another software package because WordPress Database Backup always works, backs up data to another server I have, and it hasn’t failed me yet. I always test the restores of data that I’m backing up and I recommend that you test this (mileage may vary) if you choose to put it into production as well (false senses of security are in many cases worse than no security).

September 28th, 2010

Posted In: WordPress

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