krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

The hostinfo command displays information about your host; namely your kernel version, the number of processors the kernel is configured for, the number of physical processors active, the number of logical processors active, the type of those processors, which ones are active, the amount of memory available, tasks, threads, and average load.

Run hosting without any arguments or options:

hostinfo

The output would be as follows (ymmv per system):

Mach kernel version:
Darwin Kernel Version 15.0.0: Wed Aug 26 19:41:34 PDT 2015; root:xnu-3247.1.106~5/RELEASE_X86_64
Kernel configured for up to 4 processors.
2 processors are physically available.
4 processors are logically available.
Processor type: x86_64h (Intel x86-64h Haswell)
Processors active: 0 1 2 3
Primary memory available: 16.00 gigabytes
Default processor set: 395 tasks, 1711 threads, 4 processors
Load average: 1.78, Mach factor: 2.21

There are a bunch of other commands that can provide far more detailed information about your system. However, hostinfo has remained basically unchanged for 13 years, so if I can get something there, I can trust it’s fairly future-proofed in my scripts.

November 23rd, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X

Tags: , , , ,

You might be happy to note that other than the ability to interpret new payloads, the profiles command mostly stays the same in El Capitan, from Yosemite. You can still export profiles from Apple Configurator or Profile Manager (or some of the 3rd party MDM tools). You can then install profiles by just opening them and installing. Once profiles are installed on a Mac, mdmclient, a binary located in /usr/libexec will process changes such as wiping a system that has been FileVaulted (note you need to FileVault if you want to wipe an OS X Lion client computer). /System/Library/LaunchDaemons and /System/Library/LaunchAgents has a mdmclient daemon and agent respectively that start it up automatically. This, along with all of the operators remains static from 10.10.

To script profile deployment, administrators can add and remove configuration profiles using the new /usr/bin/profiles command. To see all profiles, aggregated, use the profiles command with just the -P option:

/usr/bin/profiles -P

As with managed preferences (and piggy backing on managed preferences for that matter), configuration profiles can be assigned to users or computers. To see just user profiles, use the -L option:

/usr/bin/profiles -L

You can remove all profiles using -D:

/usr/bin/profiles -D

The -I option installs profiles and the -R removes profiles. Use -p to indicate the profile is from a server or -F to indicate it’s source is a file. To remove a profile:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

To remove one from a server:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

The following installs HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig from /tmp:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

If created in Profile Manager:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

You can configure profiles to install at the next boot, rather than immediately. Use the -s to define a startup profile and take note that if it fails, the profile will attempt to install at each subsequent reboot until installed. To use the command, simply add a -s then the -F for the profile and the -f to automatically confirm, as follows (and I like to throw in a -v usually for good measure):

profiles -s -F /Profiles/SuperAwesome.mobileconfig -f -v

And that’s it. Nice and easy and you now have profiles that only activate when a computer is started up. As of OS X Yosemite, the dscl command got extensions for dealing with profiles as well. These include the available MCX Profile Extensions:

-profileimport -profiledelete -profilelist [optArgs]
-profileexport
-profilehelp

To list all profiles from an Open Directory object, use 
-profilelist. To run, follow the dscl command with -u to specify a user, -P to specify the password for the user, then the IP address of the OD server (or name of the AD object), then the profilelist verb, then the relative path. Assuming a username of diradmin for the directory, a password of moonknight and then cedge user:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge

To delete that information for the given user, swap the profilelist extension with profiledelete:

dscl -u diradmin -P apple 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge

If you would rather export all information to a directory called ProfileExports on the root of the drive:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profileexport . all -o /ProfileExports

In Yosemite we got a few new options (these are all still in 10.11 with no new operators), such as -H which shows whether a profile was installed, -z to define a removal password and -o to output a file path for removal information. Also, as in Yosemite it seems as though if a configuration profile was pushed to you from MDM, you can’t remove it (fyi, I love having the word fail as a standalone in verbose output):

bash-3.2# profiles -P
_computerlevel[1] attribute: profileIdentifier: 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
_computerlevel[2] attribute: profileIdentifier: 00000000-0000-0000-A000-4A414D460003
_computerlevel[3] attribute: profileIdentifier: C11672D9-9AE2-4F09-B789-70D5678CB397
charlesedge[4] attribute: profileIdentifier: com.krypted.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328
charlesedge[5] attribute: profileIdentifier: odr.krypted.com.ADD7E5A6-8EED-4B11-8470-C56C8DC1E2E6
_computerlevel[6] attribute: profileIdentifier: EE08ABE9-5CB8-48E3-8E02-E46AD0A03783
_computerlevel[7] attribute: profileIdentifier: F3C87B6E-185C-4F28-9BA7-6E02EACA37B1
_computerlevel[8] attribute: profileIdentifier: 24DA416D-093A-4E2E-9E6A-FEAD74B8B0F0
There are 8 configuration profiles installed

bash-3.2# profiles -r 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
bash-3.2# profiles -P
_computerlevel[1] attribute: profileIdentifier: F3C87B6E-185C-4F28-9BA7-6E02EACA37B1
_computerlevel[2] attribute: profileIdentifier: EE08ABE9-5CB8-48E3-8E02-E46AD0A03783
_computerlevel[3] attribute: profileIdentifier: 24DA416D-093A-4E2E-9E6A-FEAD74B8B0F0
_computerlevel[4] attribute: profileIdentifier: 00000000-0000-0000-A000-4A414D460003
_computerlevel[5] attribute: profileIdentifier: 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
_computerlevel[6] attribute: profileIdentifier: C11672D9-9AE2-4F09-B789-70D5678CB397
charlesedge[7] attribute: profileIdentifier: odr.krypted.com.ADD7E5A6-8EED-4B11-8470-C56C8DC1E2E6
charlesedge[8] attribute: profileIdentifier: com.krypted.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328
There are 8 configuration profiles installed

bash-3.2# profiles -rv 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
profiles: verbose mode ON
profiles: returned error: -204
fail

October 6th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Apple Configurator 2 is now out and there are some really cool new features available to people deploying Apple Configurator. Apple Configurator 2 now supports feature called Blueprints. A Blueprint is a set of configuration options (such as profiles, apps, etc) that are easily applied to devices by applying a given Blueprint. So basically a canned set of options that can be configured on a device. For example, you can have a Blueprint called Training that have training apps and settings for a training room network and then you can have another Blueprint for Kiosks, that have different apps for a kiosk, one app for a kiosk, an SSID for a kiosk wireless network, and throw that single app into Single User Mode. Pretty cool, since before you needed to have all this stuff in, select the appropriate options and then deploy them. Now, you can more quickly train student workers or deployment staff to get devices initially configured before deployment them in a school or company.

To install the new Apple Configurator, open up the App Store, search for Apple Configurator and then click on the Get button. It’s only 61MB so installs quickly.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 2.51.36 PM

Once installed, open Apple Configurator 2  from /Applications.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 2.51.14 PM

Another great new feature of Apple Configurator 2 is the command line interface for Apple Configurator: cfgutil. Go ahead and click on the Apple Configurator 2 menu and select Install Automation Tools from the menu.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 2.55.05 PM

When prompted,

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 2.55.09 PM

Once installed, you’ll find cfgutil at /usr/local/bin/cfgutil. I’ve been working on some documentation for using the command line interface, so I’ll get it posted when I’m done. But for now, let’s go back to Apple Configurator 2 and click on Blueprints to make a new Blueprint.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 4.09.38 PM

From Blueprints, click on your new Blueprint.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 4.09.47 PM

From the Blueprint. you can add Apps, create Profiles and assign devices. Here, we’re going to click Profiles in the sidebar. Initially there won’t be any Profiles on the device. Click on New.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 4.24.23 PM

Click on File then click on New Profile.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 4.27.14 PM

The General screen just requires a new name. There are a few new options for profiles, as you can see by clicking on Restrictions and scrolling to the bottom.

Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 4.26.48 PM

There are a lot of new options for iOS devices. Many require device supervision. I’ll cover setting up devices and enabling supervision later. Using Advanced options, you can also clear passcode, obtain unlock tokens, start single app mode, and enable encrypted backups. Plenty of fun things to cover!

October 1st, 2015

Posted In: Apple Configurator, iPhone

Tags: , , , , , , ,

OS X Server has long had a VPN service that can be run. The server is capable of running the two most commonly used VPN protocols: PPTP and L2TP. The L2TP protocol is always in use, but the server can run both concurrently. You should use L2TP when at all possible.
Sure, “All the great themes have been used up and turned into theme parks.” But security is a theme that it never hurts to keep in the forefront of your mind. If you were thinking of exposing the other services in OS X Server to the Internet without having users connect to a VPN service then you should think again, because the VPN service is simple to setup and even simpler to manage.

Setting Up The VPN Service In OS X Server

To setup the VPN service, open the Server app and click on VPN in the Server app sidebar. The VPN Settings  screen has two options available in the “Configure VPN for” field, which has two options:

  • L2TP: Enables only the L2TP protocol
  • L2TP and PPTP: Enables both the L2TP protocol and the PPTP protocol

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.23.05 PM

The VPN Host Name field is used by administrators leveraging profiles. The setting used becomes the address for the VPN service in the Everyone profile. L2TP requires a shared secret or an SSL certificate. In this example, we’ll configure a shared secret by providing a password in the Shared Secret field. Additionally, there are three fields, each with an Edit button that allows for configuration:

  • Client Addresses: The dynamic pool of addresses provided when clients connect to the VPNScreen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.24.23 PM
  • DNS Settings: The name servers used once a VPN client has connected to the server. As well as the Search Domains configuration.Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.25.11 PM
  • Routes: Select which interface (VPN or default interface of the client system) that a client connects to each IP address and subnet mask over. Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.25.50 PM
  • Save Configuration Profile: Use this button to export configuration profiles to a file, which can then be distributed to client systems (OS X using the profiles command, iOS using Apple Configurator or both using Profile Manager).

Once configured, open incoming ports on the router/firewall. PPTP runs over port 1723. L2TP is a bit more complicated (with keys bigger than a baby’s arm), running over 1701, but also the IP-ESP protocol (IP Protocol 50). Both are configured automatically when using Apple AirPorts as gateway devices. Officially, the ports to forward are listed at http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1629.

Using The Command Line

I know, I’ve described ways to manage these services from the command line before. But, “tonight we have number twelve of one hundred things to do with your body when you’re all alone.” The serveradmin command can be used to manage the service as well as the Server app. The serveradmin command can start the service, using the default settings, with no further configuration being required:

sudo serveradmin start vpn

And to stop the service:

sudo serveradmin stop vpn

And to list the available options:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn

The output of which shows all of the VPN settings available via serveradmin (which is many more than what you see in the Server app:

vpn:vpnHost = "elcapserver.krypted.lan"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions = 128
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedSearchDomains = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:SharedSecret = "1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:Address = "1.1.1.1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:SharedSecret = "2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:Address = "2.2.2.2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:enabled = yes
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Interface:SubType = "PPTP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Interface:Type = "PPP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoFailure = 5
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorEAPPlugins:_array_index:0 = "EAP-RSA"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorACLPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSACL"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:CCPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:IPCPCompressionVJ = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:ACSPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoInterval = 60
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:MPPEKeySize128 = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorProtocol:_array_index:0 = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:MPPEKeySize40 = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSAuth"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdleTimer = 7200
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:CCPProtocols:_array_index:0 = "MPPE"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:ConfigMethod = "Manual"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:0 = "192.168.210.240"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:1 = "192.168.210.254"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteTypes = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteMasks = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:LoadBalancingAddress = "1.2.3.4"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:MaximumSessions = 128
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:LoadBalancingEnabled = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedSearchDomains = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:SharedSecret = "1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:Address = "1.1.1.1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:SharedSecret = "2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:Address = "2.2.2.2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = yes
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Interface:SubType = "L2TP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Interface:Type = "PPP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoFailure = 5
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorEAPPlugins:_array_index:0 = "EAP-KRB"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorACLPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSACL"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:IPCPCompressionVJ = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:ACSPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoInterval = 60
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorProtocol:_array_index:0 = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSAuth"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdleTimer = 7200
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:SharedSecretEncryption = "Keychain"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:LocalIdentifier = ""
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:SharedSecret = "com.apple.ppp.l2tp"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:AuthenticationMethod = "SharedSecret"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:RemoteIdentifier = ""
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:IdentifierVerification = "None"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:LocalCertificate = <>
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:ConfigMethod = "Manual"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:0 = "192.168.210.224"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:1 = "192.168.210.239"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteTypes = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteMasks = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:Transport = "IPSec"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:IPSecSharedSecretValue = "yaright"

To disable L2TP, set vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled to no:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = no

To configure how long a client can be idle prior to being disconnected:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 10

By default, each protocol has a maximum of 128 sessions, configureable using vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions = 200

To see the state of the service, the pid, the time the service was configured, the path to the log files, the number of clients and other information, use the fullstatus option:

sudo serveradmin fullstatus vpn

Which returns output similar to the following:

vpn:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
vpn:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:AuthenticationProtocol = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:CurrentConnections = 0
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:enabled = yes
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:MPPEKeySize = "MPPEKeySize128"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Type = "PPP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:SubType = "PPTP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:AuthenticatorPlugins = "DSAuth"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:AuthenticationProtocol = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Type = "PPP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = yes
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:CurrentConnections = 0
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:SubType = "L2TP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:AuthenticatorPlugins = "DSAuth"
vpn:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
vpn:health = _empty_dictionary
vpn:logPaths:vpnLog = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:configured = yes
vpn:state = "STOPPED"
vpn:setStateVersion = 1

Security folk will be stoked to see that the shared secret is shown in the clear using:

vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:IPSecSharedSecretValue = "a dirty thought in a nice clean mind"

Configuring Users For VPN Access

Each account that accesses the VPN server needs a valid account to do so. To configure existing users to use the service, click on Users in the Server app sidebar.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.28.10 PM

At the list of users, click on a user and then click on the cog wheel icon, selecting Edit Access to Services.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.28.30 PM

At the Service Access screen will be a list of services that could be hosted on the server; verify the checkbox for VPN is highlighted for the user. If not, click Manage Service Access, click Manage and then check the VPN box.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.29.07 PM

Setting Up Client Computers

As you can see, configuring the VPN service in OS X Server 5 (running on El Capitan and Yosemite) is a simple and straight-forward process – much easier than eating your cereal with a fork and doing your homework in the dark.. Configuring clients is as simple as importing the profile generated by the service. However, you can also configure clients manually. To do so in OS X, open the Network System Preference pane. From here, click on the plus sign (“+”) to add a new network service.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.30.27 PM

At the prompt, select VPN in the Interface field and then either PPTP or L2TP over IPSec in the VPN Type. Then provide a name for the connection in the Service Name field and click on Create.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.31.01 PM

At the list of network interfaces in the Network System Preference pane, provide the hostname or address of the server in the Server Address field and the username that will be connecting to the VPN service in the Account Name field. If using L2TP, click on Authentication Settings.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 10.31.35 PM

At the prompt, provide the password entered into the Shared Secret field earlier in this article in the Machine Authentication Shared Secret field and the user’s password in the User Authentication Password field. When you’re done, click OK and then provided you’re outside the network and routeable to the server, click on Connect to test the connection.

Conclusion

Setting Up the VPN service in OS X Server 5 (for Yosemite or El Capitan) is as simple as clicking the ON button. But much more information about using a VPN can be required. The natd binary is still built into OS X at /usr/sbin/natd and can be managed in a number of ways. But it’s likely that the days of using an OS X Server as a gateway device are over, if they ever started. Sure “feeling screwed up at a screwed up time in a screwed up place does not necessarily make you screwed up” but using an OS X Server for NAT when it isn’t even supported any more probably does. So rather than try to use the server as both, use a 3rd party firewall like most everyone else and then use the server as a VPN appliance. Hopefully it can do much more than just that to help justify the cost. And if you’re using an Apple AirPort as a router (hopefully in a very small environment) then the whole process of setting this thing up should be super-simple.

September 23rd, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The mkdir command is used to create directories. Sometimes, in testing, you need to have a lot of directories. So, you can use the following command to create 10,000 5 digit directories, named 00001 to 10000:

mkdir $(printf '%05d\n' {1..10000})

July 13th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Ubuntu, Unix

Tags: , , , ,

I was recently building some preflight scripts and was looking to record some information about a machine live, before proceeding with a script. I found the cheapest way to determine information about architectures and chipsets when scripting preflight scripts for OS X to be the arch and machine commands respectively. For example, to verify the architecture is i386, use the arch command with no options:

/usr/bin/arch

Which simply outputs “i386”:

i386

To check the machine type, simply use the machine command:

/usr/bin/machine

Which outputs as follows:

x86_64h

December 14th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure

Tags: , , , , , , ,

QuickLook scans file contents before you open those files. Usually this just lets you view a file quickly. But you can also use this same technology from the command line to bring about a change to the Finder without actually opening a file. To access QuickLook from the command line, use qlmanage.

qlmanage -p ~/Desktop/MyTowel42.pdf

While open, click the space bar to go back to your Terminal session. The most notable use case here is that when you use qlmanage you don’t run the risk of changing the date/time stamp of the files.

November 10th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , , ,

You can export profiles from Apple Configurator or Profile Manager (or some of the 3rd party MDM tools). You can then install profiles by just opening them and installing. Once profiles are installed on a Mac, mdmclient, a binary located in /usr/libexec will process changes such as wiping a system that has been FileVaulted (note you need to FileVault if you want to wipe an OS X Lion client computer). /System/Library/LaunchDaemons and /System/Library/LaunchAgents has a mdmclient daemon and agent respectively that start it up automatically.

To script profile deployment, administrators can add and remove configuration profiles using the new /usr/bin/profiles command. To see all profiles, aggregated, use the profiles command with just the -P option:

/usr/bin/profiles -P

As with managed preferences (and piggy backing on managed preferences for that matter), configuration profiles can be assigned to users or computers. To see just user profiles, use the -L option:

/usr/bin/profiles -L

You can remove all profiles using -D:

/usr/bin/profiles -D

The -I option installs profiles and the -R removes profiles. Use -p to indicate the profile is from a server or -F to indicate it’s source is a file. To remove a profile:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

To remove one from a server:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

The following installs HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig from /tmp:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

If created in Profile Manager:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

There is a nifty new feature in the profiles command in Yosemite where you can configure profiles to install at the next boot, rather than immediately. Use the -s to define a startup profile and take note that if it fails, the profile will attempt to install at each subsequent reboot until installed. To use the command, simply add a -s then the -F for the profile and the -f to automatically confirm, as follows (and I like to throw in a -v usually for good measure):

profiles -s -F /Profiles/SuperAwesome.mobileconfig -f -v

And that’s it. Nice and easy and you now have profiles that only activate when a computer is started up. As of OS X Yosemite, the dscl command has extensions for dealing with profiles as well. These include the available MCX Profile Extensions:

-profileimport -profiledelete -profilelist [optArgs]
-profileexport
-profilehelp

To list all profiles from an Open Directory object, use 
-profilelist. To run, follow the dscl command with -u to specify a user, -P to specify the password for the user, then the IP address of the OD server (or name of the AD object), then the profilelist verb, then the relative path. Assuming a username of diradmin for the directory, a password of moonknight and then cedge user:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge

To delete that information for the given user, swap the profilelist extension with profiledelete:

dscl -u diradmin -P apple 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge

If you would rather export all information to a directory called ProfileExports on the root of the drive:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profileexport . all -o /ProfileExports

Note: Provisioning profiles can also be managed, frequently using the lower-case variant of installation and removal (e.g. -i to install, -r to remove, -c to list and -d to delete all provisioning profiles). Provisioning profiles can also come with a -u option to show the uuid. Finally, the -V option verifies a provisioning profile.

In Yosemite we have a few new options, such as -H which shows whether a profile was installed, -z to define a removal password and -o to output a file path for removal information. Also, in Yosemite it seems as though if a configuration profile was pushed to you from MDM, you can’t remove it (fyi, I love having the word fail as a standalone in verbose output):

bash-3.2# profiles -P
_computerlevel[1] attribute: profileIdentifier: 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
_computerlevel[2] attribute: profileIdentifier: 00000000-0000-0000-A000-4A414D460003
_computerlevel[3] attribute: profileIdentifier: C11672D9-9AE2-4F09-B789-70D5678CB397
charlesedge[4] attribute: profileIdentifier: com.krypted.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328
charlesedge[5] attribute: profileIdentifier: odr.krypted.com.ADD7E5A6-8EED-4B11-8470-C56C8DC1E2E6
_computerlevel[6] attribute: profileIdentifier: EE08ABE9-5CB8-48E3-8E02-E46AD0A03783
_computerlevel[7] attribute: profileIdentifier: F3C87B6E-185C-4F28-9BA7-6E02EACA37B1
_computerlevel[8] attribute: profileIdentifier: 24DA416D-093A-4E2E-9E6A-FEAD74B8B0F0
There are 8 configuration profiles installed

bash-3.2# profiles -r 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
bash-3.2# profiles -P
_computerlevel[1] attribute: profileIdentifier: F3C87B6E-185C-4F28-9BA7-6E02EACA37B1
_computerlevel[2] attribute: profileIdentifier: EE08ABE9-5CB8-48E3-8E02-E46AD0A03783
_computerlevel[3] attribute: profileIdentifier: 24DA416D-093A-4E2E-9E6A-FEAD74B8B0F0
_computerlevel[4] attribute: profileIdentifier: 00000000-0000-0000-A000-4A414D460003
_computerlevel[5] attribute: profileIdentifier: 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
_computerlevel[6] attribute: profileIdentifier: C11672D9-9AE2-4F09-B789-70D5678CB397
charlesedge[7] attribute: profileIdentifier: odr.krypted.com.ADD7E5A6-8EED-4B11-8470-C56C8DC1E2E6
charlesedge[8] attribute: profileIdentifier: com.krypted.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328
There are 8 configuration profiles installed

bash-3.2# profiles -rv 772BED54-5EDF-4987-94B9-654456CF0B9A
profiles: verbose mode ON
profiles: returned error: -204
fail

October 17th, 2014

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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After writing up the presentation for MacSysAdmin in Sweden, I decided to go ahead and throw these into a quick cheat sheet for anyone who’d like to have them all in one place. Good luck out there, and stay salty.

Get an ip address for en0:

ipconfig getifaddr en0

Same thing, but setting and echoing a variable:

ip=`ipconfig getifaddr en0` ; echo $ip

View the subnet mask of en0:

ipconfig getoption en0 subnet_mask

View the dns server for en0:

ipconfig getoption en0 domain_name_server

Get information about how en0 got its dhcp on:

ipconfig getpacket en1

View some network info:

ifconfig en0

Set en0 to have an ip address of 10.10.10.10 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0:

ifconfig en0 inet 10.10.10.10 netmask 255.255.255.0

Show a list of locations on the computer:

networksetup -listlocations

Obtain the active location the system is using:

networksetup -getcurrentlocation

Create a network location called Work and populate it with information from the active network connection:

networksetup -createlocation Work populate

Delete a network location called Work:

networksetup -deletelocation Work

Switch the active location to a location called Work:

networksetup -switchlocation Work

Switch the active location to a location called Work, but also show the GUID of that location so we can make scripties with it laters:

scselect Work

List all of the network interfaces on the system:

networksetup -listallnetworkservices

Rename the network service called Ethernet to the word Wired:

networksetup -renamenetworkservice Ethernet Wired

Disable a network interface:

networksetup -setnetworkserviceenabled off

Change the order of your network services:

networksetup -ordernetworkservices “Wi-Fi” “USB Ethernet”

Set the interface called Wi-Fi to obtain it if it isn’t already

networksetup -setdhcp Wi-Fi

Renew dhcp leases:

ipconfig set en1 BOOTP && ipconfig set en1 DHCP
ifconfig en1 down && ifconfig en1 up

Renew a dhcp lease in a script:

echo "add State:/Network/Interface/en0/RefreshConfiguration temporary" | sudo scutil

Configure a manual static ip address:

networksetup -setmanual Wi-Fi 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0 10.0.0.1

Configure the dns servers for a given network interface:

networksetup -setdnsservers Wi-Fi 10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3

Obtain the dns servers used on the Wi-Fi interface:

networksetup -getdnsservers Wi-Fi

Stop the application layer firewall:

launchctl unload /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.alf.useragent.plist
launchctl unload /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.alf.agent.plist

Start the application layer firewall:

launchctl load /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.alf.agent.plist
launchctl load /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.alf.useragent.plist

Allow an app to communicate outside the system through the application layer firewall:

socketfilterfw -t
“/Applications/FileMaker Pro/FileMaker Pro.app/Contents/MacOS/FileMaker Pro”

See the routing table of a Mac:

netstat -nr

Add a route so that traffic for 10.0.0.0/32 communicates over the 10.0.9.2 network interface:

route -n add 10.0.0.0/32 10.0.9.2

Log bonjour traffic at the packet level:

sudo killall -USR2 mDNSResponder

Stop Bonjour:

launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist


Start Bojour:

launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist

Put a delay in your pings:

ping -i 5 192.168.210.1

Ping the hostname 5 times and then stop the ping:

ping -c 5 google.com

Flood ping the host:

ping -f localhost

Set the packet size during your ping:

ping -s 100 google.com

Customize the source IP during your ping:

ping -S 10.10.10.11 google.com

View disk performance:

iostat -d disk0

Get information about the airport connection on your system:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport -I

Scan the available Wireless networks:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport -s

Trace the path packets go through:

traceroute google.com

Trace the routes without looking up names:

traceroute -n google.com

Trace a route in debug mode:

traceroute -d google.com

View information on all sockets:

netstat -at

View network information for ipv6:

netstat -lt

View per protocol network statistics:

netstat -s

View the statistics for a specific network protocol:

netstat -p igmp

Show statistics for network interfaces:

netstat -i

View network information as it happens (requires ntop to be installed):

ntop

Scan port 80 of www.google.com

/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications/Network\ Utility.app/Contents/Resources/stroke www.google.com 80 80

Port scan krypted.com stealthily:

nmap -sS -O krypted.com/24

Establish a network connection with www.apple.com:

nc -v www.apple.com 80

Establish a network connection with gateway.push.apple.com over port 2195

/usr/bin/nc -v -w 15 gateway.push.apple.com 2195

Establish a network connection with feedback.push.apple.com only allowing ipv4

/usr/bin/nc -v -4 feedback.push.apple.com 2196

Setup a network listener on port 2196 for testing:

/usr/bin/nc -l 2196

Capture some packets:

tcpdump -nS

Capture all the packets:

tcpdump -nnvvXS

Capture the packets for a given port:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548

Capture all the packets for a given port going to a given destination of 10.0.0.48:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548 dst 10.0.0.48

Capture the packets as above but dump to a pcap file:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548 dst 10.0.0.48 -w /tmp/myfile.pcap

Read tcpdump (cap) files and try to make them human readable:

tcpdump -qns 0 -A -r /var/tmp/capture.pcap

What binaries have what ports and in what states are those ports:

lsof -n -i4TCP

Make an alias for looking at what has a listener open, called ports:

alias ports='lsof -n -i4TCP | grep LISTEN'

Report back the name of the system:

hostname

Flush the dns cache:

dscacheutil -flushcache

Clear your arp cache:

arp -ad

View how the Server app interprets your network settings:

serveradmin settings network

Whitelist the ip address 10.10.10.2:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/afctl -w 10.10.10.2

Finally, the script network_info.sh shows information about a Macs network configuration. Both active and inactive network interfaces are listed, in the order that they are used by the OS and with a lot of details (MAC-address, interface name, router, subnet mask etc.).

September 25th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stroke got moved, so dug this up and am reprinting with the latest and greatest location.

Network Utility has a port scanner – it’s built in and really easy to use. Sure, stroke isn’t nmap, but it’s not trying to be… Since Network Utility is distributed with every copy of Mac OS X it stands to reason that every copy of Mac OS X has the ability to scan a port without using a GUI tool.  Enter one of the best named tools in Mac OS X, stroke.  Stroke is the command line back-end to the Port Scan tab of Network Utility.  To use stroke, you will need to cd into the Network Utility application bundle and then cd into Contents and then Resources.

Once you are at “/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications/Network Utility.app/Contents/Resources”, you will need to provide stroke with an IP address (or name), followed by the first port to scan and then the last (or the same number twice if your range is only one IP address.  For example, if you want to port scan port 80 on your own system you could use the following:

./stroke 127.0.0.1 80 80

But you shouldn’t just stroke yourself (sorry, couldn’t help it).  You should also stroke others (Clarence Carter be damned!).  So if you want to port scan www.google.com for port 80 the following would achieve such a lofty goal:

./stroke www.google.com 80 80

Because the name www.google.com has to resolve, you’re actually able to check whether a DNS error occurs and whether you can communicate over port 80 to the host in one command.  If you want to make a copy of stroke into a directory and then add it to your environment variable’s PATH you can then use it without needing to change your working directory.

September 8th, 2014

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security, Network Infrastructure

Tags: , , , ,

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