Tag Archives: Books

Articles and Books

Three New Take Control Books Titles On Yosemite

Kudos to Take Control (including Joe Kissell and Schools McFarland here) for being on the spot with getting Yosemite titles out in alignment with the release of the actual operating system. To put you in control of Apple’s new OS X 10.10 Yosemite they have three books for you today: the first two are straightforward and useful, and the third has more real-world, practical advice for the modern Mac user than anything we’ve published recently. To quote the release information today, they are:

*  “Take Control of Upgrading to Yosemite,” by Joe Kissell
*  “Yosemite: A Take Control Crash Course,” by Scholle McFarland
*  “Digital Sharing for Apple Users: A Take Control Crash Course,” also by Joe Kissell

Download them from your Take Control Library > http://www.takecontrolbooks.com/account

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We’re really excited (and tired, after finishing publication after midnight last night) about these books because they can help lots of Mac users, and we’d really appreciate it if you could tell people about them. In particular, in the two Take Control Crash Courses, each chapter has tweet-worthy tips and built-in sharing buttons so you can spread useful information to your extended networks. It’s pretty innovative for a book — take a look! Anyway, about these titles…

Do you want to upgrade to Yosemite with confidence? You can’t go wrong with “Take Control of Upgrading to Yosemite,” now in its 8th major installment. The title has helped tens of thousands of Mac users since 2003, and gives you the benefit of Joe Kissell’s superlative background. You’ll ensure that your hardware and software are ready for Yosemite, protect against problems with a bootable duplicate, eliminate digital clutter, prepare your Mac, and decide on your best installation method, no matter what version of Mac OS X you’re upgrading from, all the way back to 10.4 Tiger. You’ll find full installation directions plus advice on over a dozen things to do immediately after installation and troubleshooting techniques. Joe also explains upgrading from the Yosemite public beta and “upgrades” that involve moving your data to a new Mac from an old Mac or Windows PC. It’s 152 pages and costs $15.

Get more information > http://tid.bl.it/tco-yosemite-upgrading-info

The next two books are in our new Take Control Crash Course series, which brings you the first-rate content you expect from us in shorter chunks so you can dip in and read quickly. Because so many Take Control readers provide tech support to others, each concise chapter has sharing buttons and practical tweet-tips, making it easy to freely share a few pages with Facebook friends, Twitter followers, and others who really need the information. Take Control Crash Courses feature a modern, magazine-like layout in PDF while retaining a reflowable design in the EPUB and Mobipocket.

Read “Yosemite: A Take Control Crash Course,” to get more out of your Mac as you go about your everyday activities. Written by former Macworld editor Scholle McFarland, this book introduces Yosemite’s new interface and discusses new features like iCloud Drive, Handoff, iPhone voice/SMS relay, and Notification Center’s Today view. You’ll learn about key changes in core Apple apps with chapters about Safari, Mail, Messages, and Calendar. You’ll also find answers to questions brought on by recent additions to OS X, such as how to control notifications, tips for using Finder tags, and working with tabbed Finder windows. The book closes with two under-the-hood topics, setting up a new user account (for a child, guest, or troubleshooting) and troubleshooting (with techniques including Safe Boot and OS X Recovery). It’s 77 pages and $10.

Get more information > http://tid.bl.it/yosemite-crash-course-info

Beyond what’s new in Yosemite is the larger problem facing most of us — how to work effectively in today’s modern ecosystem of devices, services, and collaborators. Frankly, sharing with other people and devices is messy, because everyone wants something different. That’s why “Digital Sharing for Apple Users: A Take Control Crash Course” may be our most important book of the year, and why we are so grateful to Joe Kissell for taking on the challenge of describing how to share nearly anything you can think of in nearly every imaginable situation. Here are just a few of the gems in this book:

*  How iCloud Photo Sharing and My Photo Stream are entirely different
*  How to share photos fleetingly, privately, permanently, or with your fridge
*  The best ways to sync a project’s worth of files with others
*  Services to provide ubiquitous access to your own files across devices
*  Quick ways to make a file available for download by anyone
*  How to share calendars with others, whether or not they use iCloud
*  A brief tutorial on enabling Family Sharing
*  Tweaky workarounds for contact sharing, which is surprisingly difficult
*  How to rip a DVD to your MacBook Air using an older Mac’s SuperDrive
*  How to turn your iPhone or Mac into a Wi-Fi hotspot
*  Ways of watching your uncle work remotely, as you help him with iTunes
*  Approaches to syncing Web browser bookmarks and tabs with multiple devices
*  How to securely share a collection of passwords with someone else

The list of essential but often frustrating modern tasks goes on and on, and the solutions go beyond what Apple offers, so the book does too. Non-Apple products mentioned include 1Password, AirFoil, BitTorrent Sync, Cargo Lifter, CloudyTabs, Dropbox, Exchange, Facebook, Flickr, Google+, Google Calendar, Google Chrome, Google Docs, Instagram, iPhoto Library Manager, Outlook, Pandora, PhotoCard, Printopia, Reflector, Rdio, Spotify, Syncmate, Syncphotos, Transporter, Twitter, Xmarks, and more.

And, thanks to the new Take Control Crash Course format, you can jump right to the chapter that answers your question, without having to read through lots of other information. It’s 87 pages and only $10.

Get more information > http://tid.bl.it/digital-sharing-crash-course-info

Thank you for your support of Take Control… we couldn’t do it without you!

cheers… -Adam & Tonya Engst, Take Control publishers

Articles and Books Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Chapter 4 of Take Control of OS X Server Now Available

The chapters from my upcoming Take Control book keep rolling into the TidBits website. The next installment is Chapter 4: Directory Services, which can accessed at http://tidbits.com/article/14821.

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Hope you enjoy!

Articles and Books

Facebook Pages

Better late than never. Facebook pages for some of my books:

Will post a few more things soon. Thanks!

Articles and Books Business

Amazon Now Has Book Trade Ins

When I was in college, at the end of each semester we’d go to the book store (you know, that place that fleeced us with $100 used books) and we’d sell back those books for about one tenth to one quarter what we bought them from. We’d then use that money to help fund one of our books for the next semester (or beer). Well, Amazon is doing something similar now. Although it has to do more with when new editions of the book are released. Each edition of a book allows you to trade the book in for new editions.

Take Practical C++ Programming, from O’Reilly. Apparently I bought the chipmunk book at some point. In fact, considering the fact I can see it on my shelf from where I’m sitting I am certain of it (unless I am hallucinatin’ again – in which case I would really hope for something better than a freakin’ tech book). When I go to the page for that book on Amazon, they know I bought it (they sold it to me after all) and they’re kind enough to offer to buy it off me for about a buck and a half (about 1 / 20th what I bought it for) and sell me the new edition for about $25.30 (or $6.53 used).

I know I’m poking at this just a little bit, but that’s just because it makes me think of college. I honestly think it’s a really great feature. There are so many options for things like books and this is just another that will keep me going back to Amazon!

Network Infrastructure

A Little Light Reading

The last book (far right, Enterprise Mac Managed Preferences) is fresh, exciting (to me at least) and unique in that it is the most comprehensive information regarding managed preferences you can find. Management en masse of Mac OS X is very lucky to have this compendium. If the chapter in our Enterprise Integration book left you wanting more information about managed preferences then this book is for you!

Articles and Books Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Books Redux

The books page had been pulled down for a little while due to some issues I was having embedding images. So I went back to the drawing board and found a way to get a carousel of images. So the page with the books I’ve done is back up and online. Hope you like (and yes, I know they spin too fast, it’s still a little bit of a work in progress).
My Books

Articles and Books Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

All 3 Snow Leopard Titles Now on Amazon

All 3 of the Snow Leopard titles I’m working on, editing or in one case done with for Apress are now posted to Amazon and can be purchased.

Articles and Books

iTunes App Store: Books

According to a recent O’Reilly Radar report, the fastest growing category on the iTunes App store is books. Some of these are full blown books at full cost. Others are $.99 or even free. This is an interesting potential source of being able to self-publish quickly on micro-topics. For example, a miniature 20 page book on how to do something very specific, sold on the App store for $.99 might be worth the cost to certain people. Like any other app, it might even take off and be uber-popular. On the same token, as an advertising ploy a free book might take off and garner a lot of attention.

No matter how you look at it, the book market is changing, especially with regards to computer books. People don’t buy as many printed books as they used to. And to some degree why would they when there are plenty of web sites that can team them what they want to know. However, as I can tell you from running this site and having written some books, it’s not as simple as all that. When I sit down to write a book I try to organize everything in a manner that will teach a reader a subject. Which is completely different than blogging on 99% of the sites out there, where you might cover installation of Xsan a month after you covered how to change the name of a volume. The problem with trying to learn a subject start-to-finish that way is that you pick up bits and pieces here and there rather than being taught the subject.

Anyway, just food for thought: If you’re interested in writing and don’t know how to break into the market, looking towards the new media outlets such as selling books on iTunes isn’t a terrible way to get started.

Articles and Books

Neal Stephenson's Anathem

If you’re a geek, especially one interested in what I’ve started to call scientific fiction, then this is for you.  Neal Stephenson’s last work, a trilogy about slavery and the effect of the scientific community on it during the Age of Reason was astounding.  In the Cryptonomicon he really managed to bring about the concepts of cryptography from the point of view of someone surviving World War II.  In the U, he drilled down on the whole idea of a massive University and how ludicrous they had become (reminding me of my dorms at UGA along the way).  But in this title he goes back even further and looks more at the underlying source of math and gives it a great fictional twist.  Definitely worth checking out.  And if you’re in airplane’s a lot then worth checking out in audio…

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewAudiobook?id=292061895&s=143441

Articles and Books Mac OS X

Mac OS X for Unix Geeks

Today I received a copy of Mac OS X for Unix Geeks from O’Reilly, for which I was the technical editor on.  Great read, especially for the *nix to Mac switcher.  Check it out here:

http://www.amazon.com/Mac-OS-X-Unix-Geeks/dp/059652062X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222382126&sr=8-1

Big pat on the back to Brian Jepson, Ernest Rothman and Rich Rosen for releasing a great new version of their book!