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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Apple recently introduced a laptop with the same fingerprint technology found in an iPhone as well as a T-1 chip to take the sapphire Touch ID sensor information and store it securely, non-reversibly(ish), on the machine. OS X 10.12 now comes with a tool that can manage the fingerprints, stored as keys, on the device. The bioutil command is simple to use, with a few options that are mostly useful for enabling different features of the new technology. Let’s get started by enabling the unlock option, using the -r option to see if Touch ID is enabled for the current user and -s to check the system as well: bioutil -r -s Now let’s enable Touch ID to be able to unlock the system, with -u (provided it’s not already enabled): bioutil -u If you’ll be using ApplePay, also use -a (on a per-user basis): bioutil -a Next, let’s enables Touch ID to unlock the system for the current user: bioutil -w -u 1 This user will obviously need to provide their fingerprint in order to use Touch ID. Once done, let’s see how many fingerprints they’ve registered using the -c option (which checks for the number of fingerprints registered by the currently enrolled user): bioutil -c Now let’s delete all fingerprints for the current user (note that they’re not reversible so you can’t actually look at the contents): bioutil -p Next, we’ll use sudo to remove all fingerprints for all users (since we’re crossing from user land, we’ll need to provide a password): sudo bioutil -p -s Instead, we could have targeted just deleting the fingerprints that had been registered for user 1024, using -s and -d together, followed by the actual UID (which also requires sudo – as with all -s option combos): sudo bioutil -s -d 1024 Now let’s disable Touch ID for the computer, using -w to write a config, and that -u from earlier, setting it to 0 for off: sudo bioutil -w -s -u 0 And viola, you’re managing the thing. Throw these in an Extension Attribute or in Munki and you’re managing/checking/knowing/reporting/all the thingsings! Enjoy!

December 16th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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