Package Manager Like apt-get For Windows 10

In Windows 10, Microsoft has finally baked a package manager called OneGet into Windows. It works similarly to apt-get and other package managers that have been around for decades in the Linux world; just works in PowerShell, rather than bash. So let’s take a quick peak. First, import it as a module from a PowerShell prompt: Import-Module -Name OneGet Next, use Get-Command to see the options for the OneGet Module: Get-Command -Module OneGet This will show you the following options: Find-Package Get-Package Get-PackageProvider Get-PackageSource Install-Package Register-PackageSource Save-Package Set-PackageSource Uninstall-Package Unregister-PackageSource Next, look at the repositories of package sources you have: Get-PackageSource You can then add a repo to look at, using Register-PackageSource. Or, we’ll just fire away at locating our first package, Acrobat: Find-Package -Name AdobeReader Or you could pipe that output to the Install-Package option: Find-Package -Name AdobeReader | Install-Package Or Firefox, verbosely: Install-Package -Name Firefox -Verbose Or ASP.NET MVC silently (using -Force): Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.Mvc -Force In some cases, you can also use the -Version option to define a specific version, which is why I ended up writing this in the first place – swapping between versions of asp has been a bit of a pain since the introduction of its first update, it seems… PowerShell logo

SaaS Defined

From Wikipedia:
Software as a service (SaaS, typically pronounced ‘Sass’) is a model of software deployment where an application is hosted as a service provided to customers across the Internet. By eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, SaaS alleviates the customer’s burden of software maintenance, ongoing operation, and support. Conversely, customers relinquish control over software versions or changing requirements; moreover, costs to use the service become a continuous expense, rather than a single expense at time of purchase. Using SaaS also can conceivably reduce the up-front expense of software purchases, through less costly, on-demand pricing. From the software vendor’s standpoint, SaaS has the attraction of providing stronger protection of its intellectual property and establishing an ongoing revenue stream. The SaaS software vendor may host the application on its own web server, or this function may be handled by a third-party application service provider (ASP). This way, end users may reduce their investment on server hardware too.

ASP Defined

ASP stands for an Active Server Page, a type of web page that is hosted on a server that supports the ASP scripting engine.  ASP is a file that contains text, HTML, and/or ASP scripting commands. ASP files use/require the *.asp extension.  Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) supports ASP. You can also use ASP with varrying forms of (or add-ons for) Apache such as Apache::ASP::Install.