krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

I mess computers up a lot. And that means I have to reload operating systems a lot. I’ve also been having terrible issues caused by autocorrect. So… Let’s disable it. By sending the NSAutomaticSpellingCorrectionEnabled key as a false boolean into NSGlobalDomain:

defaults write NSGlobalDomain NSAutomaticSpellingCorrectionEnabled -bool false

July 27th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

The caffeinate command is pretty cool. It keeps your computer from going to sleep. It can run in a couple of different ways. There’s a timer that prevents sleep for a little while. You can also run another command from within caffeinate that keeps the system awake until the other command is finished. Here, we’ll scp a file called source file to a host called servername and keep the system from going to sleep until the process is finished:

caffeinate -s scp sourcefile me:servername/targetfile

Here, we’ll just use the boring command to tell the computer not to go to sleep for an hour:

caffeinate -t 3600 &

July 24th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

You see a lot of entries for various things in log files. Here, we’re going to print out the number of entries with backupd in them:

awk '/backupd/{print NR}' /var/log/system.log

July 11th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Ubuntu, Unix

Tags: , , , , , ,

You can shut (and restart) Macs down immediately using the shutdown command. To do so, run the following command:

shutdown -r now

July 1st, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

Tags: , , , ,

May 31st, 2015

Posted In: Product Management

Tags: , ,

JAMF Software
Join us for the 2015 JNUC!

WHEN:
October 13-15, 2015

WHERE:
Guthrie TheaterMinneapolis, MN

WHY:
Be a part of the largest gathering of Apple system administrators in the world.

 

RSVP to attend

Last year, nearly a thousand Apple admins took over the Guthrie Theater for the JAMF Nation User Conference (JNUC) to learn new and better ways to manage Mac, iPad, iPhone, and Apple TV in their environment. This year, help us break the thousand mark!

The JAMF Nation User Conference is not a sales expo or a tradeshow. Instead, it’s a welcoming, three-day rally of user and community presentations, hands-on labs, instruction, and developer training. You will leave with practical information you can take back to your organization and use to make an immediate impact.

Registration is free and open to members of the Apple IT community. We hope you can make it and look forward to seeing you in October.

JAMF Software

Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram JAMF Nation
Resources | Products | Solutions | Contact | Jobs | Blog

May 28th, 2015

Posted In: Mac OS X

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Apple Watch is just another wearable with a limited feature set. In much the same way that the iPhone is just another phone. But they’re not. They have apps. And the apps are what make these devices so powerful. Installing apps on an Apple Watch is pretty straight forward. But before we do, it’s worth mentioning that there are two types. the first is a glance. This is just another view for an app that is on your iPhone that the Apple Watch talks to. The second is an actual app. These have more functionality and more options. There are also built-in apps that can be shown or hidden.

Apps are managed from the phone. To install either type of app, simply open the Apple Watch app on your phone. From there, you will see any apps that have either an app or a glance available on a device.

IMG_3508

Tap on an entry and you’ll see whatever is available for that app. New apps aren’t displayed on your Apple Watch. Use the slider to control whether it is displayed or not.

IMG_3509

Some apps have more options. If so, tap on the app and enable those options if needed. When you enable these apps, you’ll see the icon start loading on the watch, in much the same way that an icon starts to load on a phone when you purchase the app from the App Store.

IMG_3510

Also, some apps, when you download an update to the app, will even prompt you to install a glance for the app on your phone.

IMG_3511

 

The apps show up on right side of the default apps on the watch.

IMG_3647

Here’s the Nike app. This app only works properly when you open the app on the phone. It sits at a loading screen and only opens when the app on the phone opens. When it shows up, you can then do whatever the app is built to do. In this case, start and stop runs.

IMG_3648

That’s it. Straight forward. Just be patient. Takes awhile for Apple Watches to communicate with phones and to move data back and forth between them.

May 14th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

Tags: , , , , ,

When I started to write this, I had this idea that I’d write an article that looked at the features and the usability of the Pebble and those of the Apple Watch. Both have the ability to load custom apps, both have app stores, both do many of the same other tasks, etc.

watch-dmPebble_Technology_Pebble_669108_i0

The problem with that premise for this article is that they simply aren’t even remotely comparable. Let’s look at why:

  • Apps: The Apple Watch can support apps and glances from apps. You can load as many as the thing can take, you can get different types of apps and there are already hundreds (if not thousands – I don’t have the patience to count) of apps that have support for the Apple Watch. The Pebble on the other hand is limited to 8 concurrent apps and I have never actually found more than 5 that I wanted to use that didn’t involve a watch face.
  • Watch faces: I don’t change watch faces really. Most of the apps on a Pebble are all about custom watch faces. Pick your favorite school, your favorite Disney character, etc. The watch faces available for the Apple Watch are great and all, but the default face, with instant access to the calendar, your exercise stats, the weather, and of course the time, are is really what the device is about and the best usability option, something Apple has always excelled at. It would be great if the other time zone option on the Apple Watch had some really cool stuff you could swap it out with. If you force tap on the screen, you can certainly select other things, but all the cool stuff is placed in other areas of the default watch face.
  • The screen: The screen on the Apple Watch is just a beautiful screen, with full color, lots of pixels, etc. The screen on the Pebble more closely resembles options from an Atari 2600. So, think Wii vs 2600 (aka e-paper)…
  • The app that manages the wearable: The Apple Watch app has in app controls for what’s available on phones, can configure which apps/glances are shown, unpair/re-pair, configure notifications, manage Do Not Disturb, put the device into Do Not Disturb mode, configure passcodes, manage sounds and vibrations, configure brightness and size. It’s pretty robust. The app for the Pebble does much less, but is on par given the features available on the device in general.
  • Light: The type of light emitted by the Pebble actually makes it a little easier to see in sunlight to me. But if you have sunglasses on then forget about it. Which I usually do when there’s a lot of sunlight. But this is a showstopper for some. Like those who (legitimately) still look for raised keyboards on phones…
  • Battery life: The Pebble kicks the crap out the Apple Watch when it comes to battery life. I’ve not charged my Pebble once in a week and it was happily camping straight into the next week. My Apple Watch must be charged daily.
  • Older iPhones: The Pebble can work on any iOS 6 compatible device (and up). The Apple Watch needs an iOS 8 device. So if you have an older phone, you’ll likely want a Pebble. Or take this as the opportunity to stop listening to 90s era Brittany Spears and upgrade your phone when you buy a watch.
  • App security: There are apps that can muck up a Pebble. This ranges from screen distortion to apps crashing. I tend to think that if an app can cause a device to crash then it could be intentionally designed to do more worser (yes, that was on purpose) things to the device as well. I could be wrong and haven’t spent any real time doing security research on the device, but it seems like a bad thing. Meanwhile, apps that go to an Apple Watch go through the App Store and so have at least some semblance of review.
  • Music Control: I like the Pebble more in this respect. It instantly sends commands to music on your phone. The Apple Watch always seems to be just a little bit delayed (not bad, but I can notice the delay). Having said that, the Apple Watch also has a Remote app, so you can also control music streaming out of computers onto Apple TVs.
  • Instant Messaging: The Pebble can show you messages. The Apple Watch can as well, but goes a step or 10 further and actually allows you to send voice messages, text messages, animated Emoji and even your heartbeat (which people keep creepily sending me – except that one guy who has none – but we all knew he was a lich so whatever on that).
  • Fitness: The fitness options on the Pebble are mostly from apps. The apps are a bit limited, but you can do a few pretty cool things. There are more built-in options on the Apple Watch; however, the 3rd party apps for Fitness tracking are pretty considerable and growing daily.
  • Pay for all the stuffs: Apple Pay isn’t the most widely accepted form of payment around, but it is gaining in popularity and pretty cool. Not sure if NFC is really going to be changing the world, but it might, and a wearable that isn’t specifically a fitness tracker is likely going to need it over the coming year.
  • Price: The Pebble can be $89. The Apple Watch starts at $350 and goes up to thousands (10 of ’em actually).

Overall, the Pebble is inexpensive. At 4 times the cost is the Apple Watch, which has less battery power but way more features. So it’s not Apples to Apples (no pun intended) to compare these. If you’re interested in a really inexpensive wearable and not worried about all the crazy features that come on them, check out the Pebble. But, the Apple Watch, as with many an Apple product, is very much worth the price tag. Unless you’re getting a gold one…

May 11th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

You waited. And you tapped your fingers on the desk. And you sat and waited some more, for the UPS person. You stared at your mailbox. And then, after all of that, UPS showed up. And you signed. And then you had that box in your hands. The cardboard box, when opened, gave way to a sweet white box. You opened it by pulling the little tag off, and then you pulled the watch out of the box. You tried on the two bands. And you picked the one that fit you the best.

So now what? Turn on the watch by hitting the button on the side and watch that beautiful Apple logo light up the screen. But now you need to pair the watch with your phone for it to be useable. So what to do? Well, first of all, make sure your phone is updated to the latest and greatest version of iOS. From there, open the Apple Watch app on the iPhone.

IMG_3471

The app will prompt you to start pairing a watch with the phone. You can only pair one watch with an iPhone. Tap the Start Pairing button. When prompted, line up the screen on the watch with the image and the outline.

IMG_3472

Wait for the watch to complete pairing and then tap the Set Up Apple Watch button.

IMG_3473

You’ll then be prompted for which wrist to put the watch on. I used my dominant wrist, so right.

IMG_3474

You’ll then be prompted to accept the Terms and Conditions (aka license agreement) from Apple. Tap Agree.

IMG_3475

Tap Agree again.

IMG_3476

Next, when prompted for the Apple ID to use, if you’d like to use an Apple ID with the watch, provide the password for that Apple ID using the Enter Password button, or use the Skip This Step option to skip the Apple ID.

IMG_3477

At the Location Services screen, tap OK. This is really just informational to let you know that Location Services will be used. It’s kinda’ necessary to use the watch properly.

IMG_3478

At the Siri screen, again, you’re informed that Siri will be used. Tap OK.

IMG_3479

At the Diagnostics screen, same thing. You’re informed that diagnostics will be supplied to Apple. Tap OK.

IMG_3480

At the Apple Watch Passcode screen, choose whether you’d like to use a passcode on the watch. I’m not a fan of using a passcode on the watch; however, you will have to use one if you want to use Apple Pay on the watch. Tap Create a Passcode to set one up now and then provide the passcode you’d like to use.

IMG_3481

The Apple Watch will sync apps and show glances from apps that are on the phone. Tap Install All to go ahead and install any Apple Watch apps on the device. You can always turn them off later. Or you can tap Choose Later to go ahead and complete setup and wait until later to set up the watch and finish apps setup later. I’d recommend using Install All and then turn off the ones you don’t want later.

IMG_3482

Then the watch will start syncing with your devices. At the Apple Watch Is Syncing screen, wait. Don’t do anything else or get the watch too far from the phone or you’ll have to start over from scratch.

IMG_3483

The watch looks like this while it’s syncing.

IMG_3484

Once the watch is finished syncing, use the My Watch app to sync apps, show glances, setup Apple Pay and configure which built-in apps are shown on the device.

IMG_3508

The next and most important aspect of your new Apple Watch is to use it and love it. Go for a run, sync some apps, enjoy the hell out of your new watch. It’s great. Now, get to it!

May 9th, 2015

Posted In: Apple Watch

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Love interviewing this guy! Who wants to be next?

May 8th, 2015

Posted In: Articles and Books, public speaking

Tags: , , , , ,

Next Page »