iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security MobileMe

MacTech Pro

MacTech just announced MacTech Pro: a new series of one day, regional events that are specifically designed for professional Apple techs, consultants, and support staff.  MacTech Pro Events are single-track, hotel-based seminars that are specifically geared to serve the needs of professional consultants, IT Pros and techs who support others on OS X and iOS.  The first MacTech Pro will take place on March 4th, 2015 in Seattle.

MacTech Pro will take place in nine U.S. cities in 2015 including:

• March 4, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Seattle
• March 25, 2015 : MacTech Pro, San Francisco
• April 15, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Boston
• May 6, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Atlanta
• June 24, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Washington DC
• July 22, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Chicago
• August 12, 2015 : MacTech Pro, New York
• September 2, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Dallas
• September 30, 2015 : MacTech Pro, Denver

Using MacTech’s proven “running order” approach, MacTech Pro will pack in the maximum amount of sessions possible into the time available combined with the opportunity to talk to sponsors, network with peers and meet new contacts. Event topics in 2015 include:

• Deconstructing iCloud Drive: What a Tech Must Know
• Time Machine Deep Dive, and Fitting it Into a Backup Strategy
• The Professional Apple Tech’s Toolbox
• Using OS Resources to Diagnose Troubles
• Caching servers, DNS Tricks, and More
• VPP, DEP, and Under 13: How New Apple ID Requirements Impact You and Your Clients
• Productivity Tools: Best Practices and Uses of Microsoft Office
• Security, Viruses and Malware. It’s real. It’s now. You need to take it seriously.
• Managing Your Clients To Increase Productivity and to Optimize Revenue

MacTech Pro Events are economically priced, include the full day of sessions, lunch, breaks and access to sponsor tables. Those who register early can take advantage of the Early Registration and save $200.00 and pay only $299 to register for any of the nine regional MacTech Pro Events in 2015.

To honor the announcement, those that register this week can save an additional $50 savings for any MacTech Pro Event in 2015 — $249 until January 26th.  EDU pricing for students, educators and staff is $199.

Additional information on topics, sessions, sessions chairs, speaker and sponsorship opportunities are available at http://pro.mactech.com/

Final Cut Server Mac OS X

Completely Reinstall Final Cut In OS X

I’ve seen a few instances where an upgrade caused Final Cut to run kinda’ strangely. To resolve, I’ve just been doing a quick reinstall of Final Cut. To do so:

  • First move the Final Cut application to the trash (it’s in the /Applications folder).
  • From your home folder, go to ~/Library/Application Support and move the Final Cut folder in there into the trash.
  • From Library/Preferences in your home folder, put com.apple.FinalCut.plist, com.apple.FinalCut.LSSharedFileList and com.apple.FinalCut.UserDestinations.plist in the trash.
  • Finally, trash com.apple.FinalCut directory from ~/Library/Caches.

Once done, go back to the Mac App Store and reinstall Final Cut and open it. Those folders you just tossed out will get re-created. Your toolbars and other customizations are likely to be gone, so you’ll have to spend a few minutes getting your workspace back to the way you had it, but if Final Cut was acting oddly it should be back to normal.

Good luck!

Ubuntu Unix

Linux and Free Memory Space

The free command in Linux is used to show memory utilization. When run without any options, you can see the used and available space of swap and physical memory. By default, the option is displayed in kilobytes but when run with a -b option it is shown in bytes or -m will show in megabytes or -g in gigabytes or -t in terabytes. So to see the free space in bytes run the following:

free -b

The -o option shows the output adjusted for the buffer. The -t option also adds a total column as well as a line for total that shows swap and physical, combined. The -s will update the output and is followed by a number of seconds. To see the number of times it happened, use the -c option. So to see the output every 60 seconds:

free -cs 60

The low and high stats are shown using the -l option:

free -l

As with many commands, you can see the version of the command using the -V option:

free -V

Finally, use the –help option to see the available options, no matter the version or OS.

Active Directory Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Destroy Open Directory Servers Using The Server App

You can destroy an LDAP server using the Server app (and still using slapconfig -destroyldapserver). To do so, open the Server app and click on Open Directory. Then click on the Open Directory server in the list of servers.

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When prompted to destroy the LDAP Master, click on Next.

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When asked if you’re sure, click Continue.

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When asked if you’re really, really sure, click Destroy.

Screen Shot 2014-12-15 at 10.10.03 PM

Wait.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server

Use a Keystroke to Maximize Finder Windows In OS X

The Maximize jelly in OS X that makes a screen the full size that the screen should be is great. The command that it runs is called Zoom. There’s another one to minimize screens, as well. The minimize has a keystroke mapped of Command-Shift-M. I use it all the time. You can also map a keystroke to make the windows bigger, invoking that Zoom command. Sometimes, when I plug and unplug the monitor on my desk at work at take my laptop home, I end up with windows stuck where the jellies (what those little buttons in the top corner of the screen are called) are above the menu bar and I can’t click them. So the keystroke helps as it basically resizes for me.

To map the keystroke to maximize a screen, first open System Preferences from the Apple menu and open the Keyboard System Preference pane. Then click on the Shortcuts tab and then App Shortcuts in the list of shortcuts. Then click on the + button at the bottom of the list. By default, you’ll see All Applications as the Application your keystroke will work in, but if you only need to do this in certain apps, you can select one instead.

Screen Shot 2015-01-15 at 8.32.46 AM

Next, in the Menu Title field, enter Zoom which is the name of that command from earlier. Click in the Keyboard Shortcut field and enter a key combination you’d like to use. On mine it’s mapped to Control-Command-M. Then click on the Add button.

Nice and easy. You might have to restart apps to pick up the new keystroke but usually you do not. Enjoy.

Oh, and if you’re interested in scripting this as part of your imaging process, see Defaults & symbolichotkeys in Mac OS X.

Active Directory Windows Server Windows XP

Kill Windows Processes In Windows 8

You can gracefully stop Windows processes using the Stop-Process command let. For example, to stop Chrome:

Stop-Process -Name Chrome

Or to stop it by ID. To locate the ID of a process, use get-process:

get-process Chrome

You can then use the -ID operator to stop the process:

Stop-Process -ID 6969

Kill is a command that all Mac and Unix admins know. It’s similar to Stop-Process, except it’s anything but graceful. And you use the -processname option to stop a process:

kill -processname calc

Bushel

The Final Countdown

bushel-logoicon-optimized@2x

personal

Bands from Minneapolis

Er, acts, bands, whatever…

Bushel iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Enroll Devices Into Bushel

To manage a device from Bushel, it must first be added to your Bushel. The technical whiz-bang name for that process is Enrollment. We currently provide 3 ways to enroll devices into your Bushel. All three are available on the Enrollment page when you’re logged into Bushel.

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 11.41.46 AM

The first and best way to enroll devices into your Bushel is an Apple program called the Device Enrollment Program, or DEP for short. DEP is a way of tying devices to your Bushel so that they cannot be removed from the device, even if the device is wiped. Other than through DEP,  all enrollment into your Bushel is optional on the devices and so devices can be unenrolled at will. DEP requires an actual DEP account with Apple, which you can sign up for at https://deploy.apple.com/qforms/open/register/index/avs.

The second way to enroll devices into your Bushel is via Open Enrollment. When you Configure Open Enrollment you create a link that allows your users to enroll without logging into the portal. Simply open Open Enrollment from the Enrollment page and click Enable. Once enabled, you’ll see the URL to enroll devices.

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 11.43.44 AM

The third way to enroll devices is manually. Simply log into your Bushel, click on Enrollment and then click on the Enroll button for Enroll This Device. When prompted for “Who will this device belong to?” enter the username (e.g. the user’s name in front of their email address most likely or the username for your email system if it’s something different than that). Also provide the email address itself in the Email Address field and then click Enroll This Device. Now, if you want to enroll the device you’re using, simply complete the screen prompts for the profile installation and you’ll be good to go. Or, you can save the mobileconfig file that’s downloaded and send it to others in order to allow them to install it as well. Simply cancel the installation process (most easily done from a Mac) and distribute the Enroll.mobileconfig file as needed. You can also put a user’s name in front of the file name, so you know which will enroll each user. If you need to enroll 3 or 4 people in other countries or cities, this might be the best option!

Screen Shot 2014-09-11 at 11.48.46 AM

OK, so we basically gave 4 ways to enroll. But that’s because we’re trying to make it as easy as possible to enroll devices into your Bushel.