Product Management

How Product Managers Feel When New Features Are Loved By All

You get requests for features. Lots of requests. What do you pick? Why? Sure, vote up, vote down, statistics, choosing people you respect, looking at potential new customers, and tons of other attributes go into this, but at the end of the day, there’s a judgement call. And some people hate what you pick. But sometimes, everyone is into it. Yup.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

qlmanage

QuickLook scans file contents before you open those files. Usually this just lets you view a file quickly. But you can also use this same technology from the command line to bring about a change to the Finder without actually opening a file. To access QuickLook from the command line, use qlmanage.

qlmanage -p ~/Desktop/MyTowel42.pdf

While open, click the space bar to go back to your Terminal session. The most notable use case here is that when you use qlmanage you don’t run the risk of changing the date/time stamp of the files.

Product Management

How Product Managers Think Users Will React To New Features

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security

Yosemite and statshares in smbutil

The statshares option has an -m option to look at a mount path for showing the path to the mount (e.g. if the mount is called krypted this should be something like /Volumes/krypted):

smbutil statshares -m /Volumes/krypted

When run, you see a list of all the attributes OS X tracks for that mount path, including the name of the server, the user ID (octal), how SMB negotiated an authentication, what version of SMB is running (e.g. SMB_1), the type of share and whether signing, extended security, Unix and large files are supported.

Additionally, if you’d like to see the attributes for all shares, use the -a option after statshares:

smbutil statshares -a

Overall, this is a nice health check type of verb for the smbutil command that can be added to any monitoring or troubleshooting workflow. Other verbs for smbutil include lookup, status, view, and identity. All are very helpful in troubleshooting connections to smb targets.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Network Infrastructure

Directory Utility in Yosemite. I’m not Dead Yet… Mapping Attributes 101

The Directory Utility application has moved to /System/Library/CoreServices/Applications. Once open, you can use it to bind to directory services, change search policies and even dink around with NIS if you still rock the flannel with your ripped up jeans. But, the thing that I tend to do in Directory Utility the most is look at user and group attributes. To do so, open Directory Utility and click on the Directory Editor tab. In the bar directly below, you’ll see Viewing and In Node. The Viewing option is what type of object you’re going to look at. The In Node option shows the directory domain you’re viewing. Below, we show the local users in /Local/Default. Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 9.02.04 AM

Click on a user and you will see all of the attributes that exist for that user. Not all users are created equal when it comes to attributes, so if you’re looking for a specific attribute then you can go through different users to see what they have.

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 9.12.18 AM

Change the In Node option to /LDAPV3/127.0.0.1 (or the name of your directory service such as your Active Directory) to see all the attributes available there. You can then note the names and use them in scripts, etc.

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 9.04.11 AM

You can also access this information via dscl, but I’ve covered that enough times in the past to be bored with myself for even making the reference. Enjoy.

Mac OS X Mass Deployment

Upgrade to OS X Yosemite

Installing OS X has never been easier than in Yosemite. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) to OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.09.18 PM

Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite).

Install1

At the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you).

Install2

At the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

Install3

At the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot.

Install4

And you’re done. Now for the fun stuff!

Install5

Articles and Books Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Yosemite Server Guide/Page Live

A blog is a great way to communicate information. But pedagogy, yo… Blogs are not great ways to teach in a guided manner. But they can be. So with a little Table of Contents, or a Guide of sorts, you can easily communicate in a fashion similar to a book. And this makes the third annual OS X Server Guide that I’m publishing in this manner; the guides for Mavericks and Mountain Lion are  still available. I doubt I’ll ever actually bother to take them down.

I’ve been working on getting the annual guide up for a few weeks and while there are still some posts remaining, but it’s basically done (some articles just haven’t gone up yet, but they’re basically written). So, if you’re fighting the good fight (and I do think it’s a good fight) and rolling Yosemite Server, click over on http://krypted.com/guides/yosemite-server for the latest guide, covering OS X Server 4 running on OS X Yosemite (which I still like to call Yosemite Server).

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.49.04 PM

Oh, and if you’re keeping track (doubtful): yah, I know I never finished the Windows Server Guide, but I did write and finish the Xsan one and there might have been a divorce, 2 books, a product release, job change and a few benders mixed in there – one of which might still be ongoing… So I’ll eventually get back to it. Or not….

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure Xsan

Upgrading To OS X Server (4.0) on Yosemite

Setting up OS X Server has never been easier. Neither has upgrading OS X Server. In this article, we’ll look at upgrading a Mac from OS X 10.8 or 10.9 running Server 2 or Server 3 to OS X 10.10 (Mavericks) running Server 4.

The first thing you should do is clone your system. The second thing you should do is make sure you have a good backup. The third thing you should do is make sure you can swap back to the clone should you need to do so and that your data will remain functional on the backup. The fourth thing you should do is repeat all that and triple check that your data is there!

Once you’re sure that you have a fallback plan, let’s get started by downloading OS X Yosemite from the App Store. I would also purchase the Server app first while Yosemite is downloading. Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.15.56 PM Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad. Once downloaded, you’ll see Install OS X Yosemite sitting in LaunchPad, as well as in the /Applications folder.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.09.18 PM

Open the app and click Continue (provided of course that you are ready to restart the computer and install OS X Yosemite).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.46 PMAt the licensing agreement, click Agree (or don’t and there will be no Mavericks for you).

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.48 PMAt the pop-up click Agree again, unless you’ve changed your mind about the license agreement in the past couple of seconds.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.52 PMAt the Install screen, click Install and the computer will reboot and do some installation fun stuff.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 4.45.54 PMOnce done and you’re looking at the desktop, download the latest version of the Server app you should have purchased previously, if you haven’t already. Then open it.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.05 PM
If prompted that the Server app was replaced, click OK. Then open the app.

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 5.48.52 PMAt the Update screen, click Continue (assuming this is the server you’re upgrading).

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.09 PMAt the Licensing screen, click Agree.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 5.13.12 PMWhen prompted for an administrator account, provide the username and password of an administrator and click OK.

Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 7.28.07 PMWhen the app opens, verify DNS (absolutely the most important element of this upgrade), etc and then check that configured services still operate as intended. If you end up deciding that you no longer need OS X Server, just delete the app and the contents of /Library/Server and you’re good. Handle with Care.

Mac OS X Server Windows Server Windows XP

Yosemite Server SMB and Windows

A few people have hit me up about issues getting Windows machines to play nice with the SMB built into Yosemite Server and Windows. Basically, the authentication dialog keeps coming up even when a Mac can connect. So there are two potential issues that you might run into here. The first is that the authentication method is not supported. Here, you want to enable only the one(s) required. NTLMv2 should be enabled by default, so try ntlm:

sudo serveradmin settings smb:ntlm auth = "yes"

If that doesn’t work (older and by older I mean old as hell versions of Windows), try Lanman:

sudo serveradmin settings smb:lanman auth = “yes"

The second is that the authentication string (can be seen in wireshark) doesn’t include the workgroup/domain. To resolve this, simply include the Server name or workgroup in the beginning of the username followed by a backslash(\). So you might do this as a username if your NetBios name were kryptedserver:

kryptedserver\charles

To get that exact name, use serveradmin again, to look at the smb:NetBIOSName attribute:

smb:NetBIOSName = "kryptedserver"

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mass Deployment

Create a Yosemite Installation Drive

A bootable installer is one of the fastest ways to install Yosemite. Rather than copy the installer to a local drive you can run it right off a USB disk (or Thunderbolt if you dare). Such a little USB drive would be similar to the sticks that came with the older MacBook Air, when we were all still sitting around wondering how you would ever install the OS on a computer with no optical media or Ethernet otherwise. Luckily, Apple loves us.

To make a bootable USB/flash drive of Yosemite like the one that used to come with the MacBook Air, first name the USB drive. I’ll use yosinstall for the purposes of this article. The format should be Mac OS Extended Journaled. The installer is called Install OS X Yosemite.app and is by default located in the /Applications directory. Inside the app bundle, there’s a new binary called createinstallmedia (nested in Contents/Resources).

Using this binary you can create an installation drive (similar to what we used to do with InstallESD). To do so, specify the –volume to create the drive on (note that the target volume will be erased), the path of the Install OS X Yosemite app bundle and then we’re going to select –nointeraction so it just runs through the whole thing

/Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/yosinstall --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app --nointeraction

Note: You’ll need to elevate your privileges for this to run.

Once run you’ll see that it erases the disk, copies the Installation materials (InstallESX, etc) and then makes the drive bootable, as follows:

Erasing Disk: 0%... 10%... 20%... 100%...
Copying installer files to disk...
Copy complete.
Making disk bootable...
Copying boot files...
Copy complete.

Then you can either select the new volume in the Startup Disk System Preference pane or boot the computer holding down the option key to select the new volume.

Note: If you can do this on a system with a solid state drive it will be  faster. Although this took 17 minutes last I ran it so be patient for the files to copy.