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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

So fun!

December 28th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast, public speaking

Just posted another article on NotOnMyWatch. This one on how leaders use “I” vs “We”

You can access it at: http://www.notonmywatch.solutions/cedge318/_i_vs_we

December 27th, 2016

Posted In: public speaking

Tags: , , , , , ,

My latest @Inc piece is available, this time on areas to be cognizant of before you jump into new markets or projects outside your core focus in small businesses. Hope you enjoy:

Business history is filled with examples of companies successfully entering new marketsand becoming leaders.

Apple and smartphones. Netflix expanding from mailing DVDs to video streaming. LinkedIn becoming a dominant player in online recruiting. Tesla’s decision to leap into the market for battery–based power systems for homes, businesses and utilities.

To read more, visit: http://www.inc.com/charles-edge/5-questions-you-need-to-ask-yourself-before-acting-on-that-great-new-idea.html

December 22nd, 2016

Posted In: Business

Tags: , , ,

Clay, Pepjin, Marcus, Tom, and I talk Macs at Google. Those guys are all great. I’m there for comedic relief. Not intentionally mind you…

December 20th, 2016

Posted In: public speaking

Tags: , , , , ,

Apple recently introduced a laptop with the same fingerprint technology found in an iPhone as well as a T-1 chip to take the sapphire Touch ID sensor information and store it securely, non-reversibly(ish), on the machine. OS X 10.12 now comes with a tool that can manage the fingerprints, stored as keys, on the device. The bioutil command is simple to use, with a few options that are mostly useful for enabling different features of the new technology.

Let’s get started by enabling the unlock option, using the -r option to see if Touch ID is enabled for the current user and -s to check the system as well:

bioutil -r -s

Now let’s enable Touch ID to be able to unlock the system, with -u (provided it’s not already enabled):

bioutil -u

If you’ll be using ApplePay, also use -a (on a per-user basis):

bioutil -a

Next, let’s enables Touch ID to unlock the system for the current user:

bioutil -w -u 1

This user will obviously need to provide their fingerprint in order to use Touch ID. Once done, let’s see how many fingerprints they’ve registered using the -c option (which checks for the number of fingerprints registered by the currently enrolled user):

bioutil -c

Now let’s delete all fingerprints for the current user (note that they’re not reversible so you can’t actually look at the contents):

bioutil -p

Next, we’ll use sudo to remove all fingerprints for all users (since we’re crossing from user land, we’ll need to provide a password):

sudo bioutil -p -s

Instead, we could have targeted just deleting the fingerprints that had been registered for user 1024, using -s and -d together, followed by the actual UID (which also requires sudo – as with all -s option combos):

sudo bioutil -s -d 1024

Now let’s disable Touch ID for the computer, using -w to write a config, and that -u from earlier, setting it to 0 for off:

sudo bioutil -w -s -u 0

And viola, you’re managing the thing. Throw these in an Extension Attribute or in Munki and you’re managing/checking/knowing/reporting/all the thingsings! Enjoy!

December 16th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , , ,

Posted an article on safety at things like rally’s (but pretty appropriate for other events as well) at http://www.notonmywatch.solutions/cedge318/some_tips_to_stay_safe_out_there

The world is a funny place. You might be spreading the word of peace, tolerance, and kindness, but there’s a chance that others might not be so welcoming of your message. You have a message you want to spread, but you need to be safe in order to keep fighting the good fight out there.

Safety can mean a lot of things, to a lot of different people. Each of us has a different tolerance to the challenges that surround us and seemingly varying degrees of threat levels to be concerned about. But no one thinks that there’s going to be an incident at a type of event until there is one. So here are some good things to keep in mind (not obsess about, mind you) while you’re out there trying to do good for the world.

To read the rest of the article, http://www.notonmywatch.solutions/cedge318/some_tips_to_stay_safe_out_there.

December 14th, 2016

Posted In: personal

Tags: ,

There’s a great site out there called spellcheck.net that will check your bash scripts to verify that they are syntactically correct and offer some tips on fixing issues you may encounter. In the example below, I single quoted at the end of a quoted string, and… error
screen-shot-2016-12-14-at-9-44-00-am
Hat tip to Daniel MacLaughlin for posting this site.

December 14th, 2016

Posted In: Programming, Ubuntu

December 12th, 2016

Posted In: Uncategorized

The last JamfNation User Conference, or JNUC for short, was far and away the biggest and best. It was packed though, and given the year-over-year increase in people attending, the conference is being moved to the Hyatt Regency in downtown Minneapolis.

For more information on or to early-bird register for JNUC 2017, visit the official JNUC page.

screen-shot-2016-12-14-at-9-59-38-am

I’ll certainly be there, and I look forward to seeing all of you again and meeting all the newcomers this year, as well as getting a recording going of the MacAdmins Podcast while we’re all together!

December 11th, 2016

Posted In: JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast

Chuck Joiner was kind enough to have me on MacVoices again, this time an episode focused on Holiday Gift Guides. I’d tried to stay sub-$50 but then Chuck totally stole some of my selections. We laughed. We cried. Hope you enjoy!

December 7th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Home Automation, Interviewing, public speaking, Wearable Technology

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