Manage Profiles From The Command Line In OS X 10.9

You can export profiles from Apple Configurator or Profile Manager (or some of the 3rd party MDM tools). You can then install profiles by just opening them and installing. Once profiles are installed on a Mac, mdmclient, a binary located in /usr/libexec will process changes such as wiping a system that has been FileVaulted (note you need to FileVault if you want to wipe an OS X Lion client computer). /System/Library/LaunchDaemons and /System/Library/LaunchAgents has a mdmclient daemon and agent respectively that start it up automatically.

NEWScreen-Shot-2013-10-07-at-3.50.40-PMTo script profile deployment, administrators can add and remove configuration profiles using the new /usr/bin/profiles command. To see all profiles, aggregated, use the profiles command with just the -P option:

/usr/bin/profiles -P

As with managed preferences (and piggy backing on managed preferences for that matter), configuration profiles can be assigned to users or computers. To see just user profiles, use the -L option:

/usr/bin/profiles -L

You can remove all profiles using -D:

/usr/bin/profiles -D

The -I option installs profiles and the -R removes profiles. Use -p to indicate the profile is from a server or -F to indicate it’s source is a file. To remove a profile:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

To remove one from a server:

/usr/bin/profiles -R -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

The following installs HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig from /tmp:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -F /tmp/HawkeyesTrickshot.mobileconfig

If created in Profile Manager:

/usr/bin/profiles -I -p com.WestCoastAvengers.HawkeyesTrickshot

There is a nifty new feature in the profiles command in Mavericks, where you can configure profiles to install at the next boot, rather than immediately. Use the -s to define a startup profile and take note that if it fails, the profile will attempt to install at each subsequent reboot until installed. To use the command, simply add a -s then the -F for the profile and the -f to automatically confirm, as follows (and I like to throw in a -v usually for good measure):

profiles -s -F /Profiles/SuperAwesome.mobileconfig -f -v

And that’s it. Nice and easy and you now have profiles that only activate when a computer is started up. As of OS X Mavericks, the dscl command has extensions for dealing with profiles as well. These include the available MCX Profile Extensions:

-profileimport -profiledelete -profilelist [optArgs]
-profileexport
-profilehelp

To list all profiles from an Open Directory object, use 
-profilelist. To run, follow the dscl command with -u to specify a user, -P to specify the password for the user, then the IP address of the OD server (or name of the AD object), then the profilelist verb, then the relative path. Assuming a username of diradmin for the directory, a password of moonknight and then cedge user:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge

To delete that information for the given user, swap the profilelist extension with profiledelete:
dscl -u diradmin -P apple 192.168.210.201 profilelist /LDAPv3/127.0.0.1/Users/cedge
If you would rather export all information to a directory called ProfileExports on the root of the drive:

dscl -u diradmin -P moonknight 192.168.210.201 profileexport . all -o /ProfileExports

Comments are closed.