Category Archives: Mass Deployment

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure

Mac Network Commands Cheat Sheet

After writing up the presentation for MacSysAdmin in Sweden, I decided to go ahead and throw these into a quick cheat sheet for anyone who’d like to have them all in one place. Good luck out there, and stay salty.

Get an ip address for en0:

ipconfig getifaddr en0

Same thing, but setting and echoing a variable:

ip=`ipconfig getifaddr en0` ; echo $ip

View the subnet mask of en0:

ipconfig getoption en0 subnet_mask

View the dns server for en0:

ipconfig getoption en0 domain_name_server

Get information about how en0 got its dhcp on:

ipconfig getpacket en1

View some network info:

ifconfig en0

Set en0 to have an ip address of 10.10.10.10 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0:

ifconfig en0 inet 10.10.10.10 netmask 255.255.255.0

Show a list of locations on the computer:

networksetup -listlocations

Obtain the active location the system is using:

networksetup -getcurrentlocation

Create a network location called Work and populate it with information from the active network connection:

networksetup -createlocation Work populate

Delete a network location called Work:

networksetup -deletelocation Work

Switch the active location to a location called Work:

networksetup -switchlocation Work

Switch the active location to a location called Work, but also show the GUID of that location so we can make scripties with it laters:

scselect Work

List all of the network interfaces on the system:

networksetup -listallnetworkservices

Rename the network service called Ethernet to the word Wired:

networksetup -renamenetworkservice Ethernet Wired

Disable a network interface:

networksetup -setnetworkserviceenabled off

Change the order of your network services:

networksetup -ordernetworkservices “Wi-Fi” “USB Ethernet”

Set the interface called Wi-Fi to obtain it if it isn’t already

networksetup -setdhcp Wi-Fi

Renew dhcp leases:

ipconfig set en1 BOOTP && ipconfig set en1 DHCP
ifconfig en1 down && ifconfig en1 up

Renew a dhcp lease in a script:

echo "add State:/Network/Interface/en0/RefreshConfiguration temporary" | sudo scutil

Configure a manual static ip address:

networksetup -setmanual Wi-Fi 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0 10.0.0.1

Configure the dns servers for a given network interface:

networksetup -setdnsservers Wi-Fi 10.0.0.2 10.0.0.3

Obtain the dns servers used on the Wi-Fi interface:

networksetup -getdnsservers Wi-Fi

Stop the application layer firewall:

launchctl unload /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.alf.useragent.plist
launchctl unload /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.alf.agent.plist

Start the application layer firewall:

launchctl load /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.alf.agent.plist
launchctl load /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.alf.useragent.plist

Allow an app to communicate outside the system through the application layer firewall:

socketfilterfw -t
“/Applications/FileMaker Pro/FileMaker Pro.app/Contents/MacOS/FileMaker Pro”

See the routing table of a Mac:

netstat -nr

Add a route so that traffic for 10.0.0.0/32 communicates over the 10.0.9.2 network interface:

route -n add 10.0.0.0/32 10.0.9.2

Log bonjour traffic at the packet level:

sudo killall -USR2 mDNSResponder

Stop Bonjour:

launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist


Start Bojour:

launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist

Put a delay in your pings:

ping -i 5 192.168.210.1

Ping the hostname 5 times and then stop the ping:

ping -c 5 google.com

Flood ping the host:

ping -f localhost

Set the packet size during your ping:

ping -s 100 google.com

Customize the source IP during your ping:

ping -S 10.10.10.11 google.com

View disk performance:

iostat -d disk0

Get information about the airport connection on your system:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport -I

Scan the available Wireless networks:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport -s

Trace the path packets go through:

traceroute google.com

Trace the routes without looking up names:

traceroute -n google.com

Trace a route in debug mode:

traceroute -d google.com

View information on all sockets:

netstat -at

View network information for ipv6:

netstat -lt

View per protocol network statistics:

netstat -s

View the statistics for a specific network protocol:

netstat -p igmp

Show statistics for network interfaces:

netstat -i

View network information as it happens (requires ntop to be installed):

ntop

Scan port 80 of www.google.com

/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications/Network\ Utility.app/Contents/Resources/stroke www.google.com 80 80

Port scan krypted.com stealthily:

nmap -sS -O krypted.com/24

Establish a network connection with www.apple.com:

nc -v www.apple.com 80

Establish a network connection with gateway.push.apple.com over port 2195

/usr/bin/nc -v -w 15 gateway.push.apple.com 2195

Establish a network connection with feedback.push.apple.com only allowing ipv4

/usr/bin/nc -v -4 feedback.push.apple.com 2196

Setup a network listener on port 2196 for testing:

/usr/bin/nc -l 2196

Capture some packets:

tcpdump -nS

Capture all the packets:

tcpdump -nnvvXS

Capture the packets for a given port:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548

Capture all the packets for a given port going to a given destination of 10.0.0.48:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548 dst 10.0.0.48

Capture the packets as above but dump to a pcap file:

tcpdump -nnvvXs 548 dst 10.0.0.48 -w /tmp/myfile.pcap

Read tcpdump (cap) files and try to make them human readable:

tcpdump -qns 0 -A -r /var/tmp/capture.pcap

What binaries have what ports and in what states are those ports:

lsof -n -i4TCP

Make an alias for looking at what has a listener open, called ports:

alias ports='lsof -n -i4TCP | grep LISTEN'

Report back the name of the system:

hostname

Flush the dns cache:

dscacheutil -flushcache

Clear your arp cache:

arp -ad

View how the Server app interprets your network settings:

serveradmin settings network

Whitelist the ip address 10.10.10.2:

/Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/libexec/afctl -w 10.10.10.2

Finally, the script network_info.sh shows information about a Macs network configuration. Both active and inactive network interfaces are listed, in the order that they are used by the OS and with a lot of details (MAC-address, interface name, router, subnet mask etc.).

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Network Infrastructure sites Ubuntu Unix

Manage Apex Domains In OS X

OS X Server supports running a traditional bind implementation of DNS. You can define a record for most any name, including google.com, www.google.com, www.www.google.com, etc. You can use this to redirect subdomains. In this example, we’ll create an A Record to point www.google.com to 127.0.0.1 without breaking other google.com subdomains. To get started, let’s use the DNS service in the Server app to create test.www.google.com. The reason for this is that OS X will then create a zone file for www.google.com. If we created www.google.com instead, then OS X would automatically create google.com, which would break the other subdomains. To do so, open Server app and click on the DNS Service. Then click on the plus sign to create a new record.

Screen Shot 2014-09-23 at 10.55.58 AM

Now, if you restart dns and ping test.www.google.com you should see the referenced IP. To then change www.google.com, we’d edit the zone file stored at /Library/Server/named/db.www.krypted.com. This file will look like this when you first open it:

www.google.com. 10800 IN SOA www.google.com. admin.www.google.com. (
2014092301 ; serial
3600 ; refresh (1 hour)
900 ; retry (15 minutes)
1209600 ; expire (2 weeks)
86400 ; minimum (1 day)
)
10800 IN NS test.www.google.com.
test.www.google.com. 10800 IN A 127.0.0.1

We’ll add an a record for a.www.google.com:

a.www.google.com. 10801 IN A 127.0.0.1

Now, to change the apex record, you’d just replace the name you’ve been using with an @:

@ 10801 IN A 127.0.0.1

Good luck!

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Install Xcode Command Line Tools On A Fresh Mac Image

I didn’t figure this out myself but can’t remember the source to attribute. Anyway, I image a lot of systems in my home lab for testing. Many tools I use (e.g. ant, metasploit, etc) need the Xcode Command Line Tools. The easy way to install these is to run xcode-select sung the –install option, as follows:

/usr/bin/xcode-select --install

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Installing A Java JDK On Beta Versions Of OS X

Open the installation DMG and expand the package so we can edit objects inside the package, done with pkgutil:

pkgutil —expand “/Volumes/JDK 7 Update 67/JDK 7 Update 67.pkg” “/tmp/JDKTEMP.flat”

Next, we’re going to edit that Distribution file, which is what’s checking the OS version, using vi:

vi /tmp/JDKTEMP.flat/Dstribution

Then we’re going to look for the OS version (currently 10.7) in the pm_install section:

Edit OS version to 10.10

Then let’s save the file and then flatten the package, again using pkgutil:

pkgutil —flatten “/tmp/JDKNEW.flat” “/tmp/JDK7.pkg”

Finally fire up the package:

open /tmp/JDK7.pkg

And of course, finish running the installer. Good luck!

Mac OS X Server Mass Deployment

Mobile Device Management Chapter Of Take Control Of OS X Server Now Available

The Mobile Device Management chapter (Chapter 9 if you’re keeping track) of Take Control of OS X Server is now up and available at TidBits.com for TidBits members at http://tidbits.com/article/14967. Hope you enjoy!

TCo OS X Server 1.0 Cover for PDF

Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Mail Chapter of Take Control of OS X Server Now Available

The Mail Server chapter of the Take Control book is now available up on http://tidbits.com/article/14950. I’m always torn when it comes to writing chapters on setting up mail servers. Is it socially irresponsible to help people potentially (but accidentally) create spam bots…

TCo OS X Server 1.0 Cover for PDF

Mac Security Mass Deployment MobileMe Network Infrastructure

Network Port Testing With Netcat

You can do some pretty simple testing of ports and network communications using strategies I’ve outlined in the past with tcpdump, trace route, telnet, curl, stroke and of course ping. However, netcat has a few interesting things you can do with it; namely actually run a port super-quickly to test traffic between subnets, forcing scans of ipv6 traffic, debugging sockets, keeping connections alive, parodying through SOCKS 4 and 5 and just checking for daemons that are listening rather than actually sending data to them.

In this first example, we’re going to just check that Apple’s web server is accessible (adding -v for verbose output):

/usr/bin/nc -v www.apple.com 80

The result would be pretty verbose

found 0 associations
found 1 connections:
1: flags=82<CONNECTED,PREFERRED>
outif en0
src 10.10.20.176 port 50575
dst 23.78.138.214 port 80
rank info not available
TCP aux info available

Connection to www.apple.com port 80 [tcp/http] succeeded!
HTTP/1.0 408 Request Time-out
Server: AkamaiGHost
Mime-Version: 1.0
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:41:34 GMT
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 218
Expires: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:41:34 GMT

<HTML><HEAD>
<TITLE>Request Timeout</TITLE>
</HEAD><BODY>
<H1>Request Timeout</H1>
The server timed out while waiting for the browser’s request.<P>
Reference&#32;&#35;2&#46;48cf4d17&#46;1406648494&#46;0
</BODY></HTML>

If we added a -w to timeout we’ll cut out all the cruft (but wouldn’t know that the server’s at Akamai). Next, we’ll get a little more specific and fire up a test to check Apple’s push gateway at, using port 2195:

/usr/bin/nc -v -w 15 gateway.push.apple.com 2195

But, I want the cruft for the purposes of this article. Next, we can add a -4 to force connections over IPv4 and check the Apple feedback server and port 2196, also required for APNs functionality:

/usr/bin/nc -v -4 feedback.push.apple.com 2196

Right about now, something is probably happening at Apple where they’re getting sick of me sending all this data their direction, so let’s add a -z option, to just scan for daemons, without actually sending any data their way:

/usr/bin/nc -vz -4 feedback.push.apple.com 2196

Because of how NAT works, you might notice that the src port keeps changing (incrementing actually). Here’s the thing, we’re gonna’ go ahead and force our source port to stay the same as our destination port using the -p option:

/usr/bin/nc -vz -4 -p 2196 feedback.push.apple.com 2196

Now, what if this is failing? Well, let’s spin up a listener. I like to start on my own subnet, then move to another subnet on the same network and ultimately to another network so I’m checking zone-by-zone so-to-speak, for such a failure. So, we can spin up a listener with netcat in a few seconds using the -l option on another host:

/usr/bin/nc -l 2196

Then I can scan myself:

/usr/bin/nc 127.0.0.1 2196

I could also do this as a range if I forgot which port I used per host:

/usr/bin/nc 127.0.0.1 2195-2196

Now, as is often the case, if our connection problem is because data isn’t parodying, we can also use nc to check that using the -x operator followed by an IP and then : and a port. For example:

/usr/bin/nc -vz -4 -w 10 -p 2196 -x 10.0.0.2:8080 feedback.push.apple.com 2195-2196

Fun times with push notifications. Enjoy.

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment public speaking

MacAdmins 2015

I was super-bummed that I missed the MacAdmins conference at Penn State University. But, all is not lost as MacAdmins will be held July 8-10 in 2015 at the Penn Stater Conference Center and I’ll be able to see all those awesome people there next year!

In the meantime, something fun and new is the 2014 MacAdmins Playlist to maybe get exposed to some new stuff: http://spoti.fi/VTdxLX.

As an aside, here’s a fun pic of @derflounder and I (and others) doing a round table from a few years ago on the Penn State site:

Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 1.25.10 PM

 

Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment

Interviewing Duncan for AFP548.com

Totally fun doing these interviews. If you’ve got a good story to tell, let’s do an episode!

iPhone Mac OS X Mac OS X Server Mac Security Mass Deployment Minneapolis

Come One, Come All: To The JAMF Nation User Conference

If you do deployments of Apple products, there are a few conferences to look at. Based on where you are and what industry you are in, some of these are better than others. But if you use the Casper Suite or are considering doing so, it would be really hard to beat JNUC, the JAMF Nation User Conference.

jamf-nation-user-conference-2014_1140_464_84_1399405603

And yes, I’d of said all this and posted this even if I hadn’t of come to work here a week and a half ago! So come one, come all to Minneapolis. And if you’re really nice, we’ll hook you up with some good old fashioned Minnesota lutefisk!