krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Built a quick extension attribute for Jamf Pro environments to check if TouchID is enabled and report back a string in $result – this could easily be modified and so I commented a few pointers for environments that might need to modify it (e.g. to check for user-level as it’s currently system-level). To see/have the code, check https://github.com/krypted/TouchID_check.

January 18th, 2017

Posted In: JAMF, Mac Security

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OS X Server stores most logs in files that are in the /Library/Logs/ProfileManager directory. Logs are split up between php, devicemgrd.log, scep_helper.log, servermgr_devicemgr.log, profilemanager.log and others. In my experience, if there’s a lot of errors at first, or if the service doesn’t work, just reformat and start over. But, once a server is in production, you don’t want to re-enroll devices after you do that. So, as with all good error prodding, start with the logs to troubleshoot.

By default the logs can appear a bit anemic. You can enable more information by increasing the logging level. Here, we’ll shoot it up to 6, which can be done with the following command:

sudo debugDeviceMgr 6

Debug levels go all the way to 9, but at that point things get… Noisy. And to turn it back off, use:

sudo debugDeviceMgr 1

Basically, this command sets the required services in /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/System/Library/LaunchDaemons/ to debug mode as well as /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/share/devicemgr/config/com.apple.DeviceManagement.postgres-debug.plist and /Applications/Server.app/Contents/ServerRoot/usr/share/devicemgr/config/com.apple.DeviceManagement.postgres.plist to configure debug mode. In other words, it touches a lot of services. And given how chatty some can be, only leave logging levels higher than I’d say 2 in the event of short-term troubleshooting.

December 29th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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So fun!

December 28th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast, public speaking

Apple recently introduced a laptop with the same fingerprint technology found in an iPhone as well as a T-1 chip to take the sapphire Touch ID sensor information and store it securely, non-reversibly(ish), on the machine. OS X 10.12 now comes with a tool that can manage the fingerprints, stored as keys, on the device. The bioutil command is simple to use, with a few options that are mostly useful for enabling different features of the new technology.

Let’s get started by enabling the unlock option, using the -r option to see if Touch ID is enabled for the current user and -s to check the system as well:

bioutil -r -s

Now let’s enable Touch ID to be able to unlock the system, with -u (provided it’s not already enabled):

bioutil -u

If you’ll be using ApplePay, also use -a (on a per-user basis):

bioutil -a

Next, let’s enables Touch ID to unlock the system for the current user:

bioutil -w -u 1

This user will obviously need to provide their fingerprint in order to use Touch ID. Once done, let’s see how many fingerprints they’ve registered using the -c option (which checks for the number of fingerprints registered by the currently enrolled user):

bioutil -c

Now let’s delete all fingerprints for the current user (note that they’re not reversible so you can’t actually look at the contents):

bioutil -p

Next, we’ll use sudo to remove all fingerprints for all users (since we’re crossing from user land, we’ll need to provide a password):

sudo bioutil -p -s

Instead, we could have targeted just deleting the fingerprints that had been registered for user 1024, using -s and -d together, followed by the actual UID (which also requires sudo – as with all -s option combos):

sudo bioutil -s -d 1024

Now let’s disable Touch ID for the computer, using -w to write a config, and that -u from earlier, setting it to 0 for off:

sudo bioutil -w -s -u 0

And viola, you’re managing the thing. Throw these in an Extension Attribute or in Munki and you’re managing/checking/knowing/reporting/all the thingsings! Enjoy!

December 16th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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The last JamfNation User Conference, or JNUC for short, was far and away the biggest and best. It was packed though, and given the year-over-year increase in people attending, the conference is being moved to the Hyatt Regency in downtown Minneapolis.

For more information on or to early-bird register for JNUC 2017, visit the official JNUC page.

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I’ll certainly be there, and I look forward to seeing all of you again and meeting all the newcomers this year, as well as getting a recording going of the MacAdmins Podcast while we’re all together!

December 11th, 2016

Posted In: JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast

macOS has keychains. Sometimes they’re a thing. When they are you might want to delete them. Let’s say you have an admin account. You want to keep the keychains for that account, but remove all the others. For this, you could do a shell operator to extglob. Or you could do a quick while loop as follows:

ls /Users | grep -v "admin" | while read USERNAME do; rm -Rf "/Users/$USERNAME/Library/Keychains/*" done;

If you borrow this, be careful.

December 1st, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security

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Recently, I got a strange message when trying to run a command:

You have exceeded the maximum number of shell sessions.

I’d seen a series of commands but never really needed to use them, so I ran:

shell_session_delete_expired

And viola, life was good. My command run. Of course, the next time I went to close the terminal correctly using the exit command. Upon doing so, I noticed:

logout
Saving session…
…copying shared history…
…saving history…truncating history files…
…completed.

[Process completed]

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So, I opened a new shell and ran:

shell_session_update

And go the same result. Same with:

shell_session_save

Fun.

November 8th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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Stoked that we got to interview Michael Lynn (@mikeymikey) for the MacAdmins podcast. It turned out to be a great episode on the future of Mac management and MDM. I’m glad we were able to have him join in! Pepijn and Marcus did a great job as well, so all round, a great episode. Hope you enjoy!

Or find it on the Podcast site at http://podcast.macadmins.org/2016/10/24/episode-13-mdm-me-maybe/

October 24th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast

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Automating OS installations is going to eventually be about as easy on macOS as it is in iOS (er, if you have MDM that is). But in the meantime, it’s getting a bit more challenging. The obvious way Apple would prefer this to happen these days is via the startosinstall command that first shipped with El Capitan and with brtool getting moved around all the time, and becoming less of a thing, there’s one quick and easy thing you can do:

sudo "/Applications/Install macOS Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall" --applicationpath "/Applications/Install macOS Sierra.app" --agreetolicense --nointeraction --volume /Volumes/Macintosh\ HD

In the above command, we’ve dropped “Install macOS Sierra.app” on a machine. While you’d guess that it would find the application path based on its own surname, we went ahead and supplied it as that seems to basically be a thing. Basically, –agreetolicense keeps us from having to run some expect scripts to accept a license agreement, –nointeraction suppresses as many of the screens as possible, and –volume allows us to install to any volume we’d like. This isn’t fully automated, but I have been able to layer in some more logic to quit apps before the script fires and then expect out other items from the script to automate a restart, watching for osinstallersetupd as a key.

This is all a bit bulkier than just using something like createOSXinstallPkg but it’s important to mention that there are a number of system components that are allowed for in SIP that use osinstallersetupd and so this blessed mechanism is likely the future until you can trigger an OS upgrade (and update I suppose) using an MDM command.

October 23rd, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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macOS Server has long had a VPN service to allow client computers to connect to a network even when they’re out of the office. The server was once capable of running the two most commonly used VPN protocols: PPTP and L2TP. And while PPTP is still accessible via the command line, L2TP is now configured by default when you setup the server using the Server app.

Setting Up The VPN Service In OS X Server

To setup the VPN service, open the Server app and click on VPN in the Server app sidebar. The VPN Settings  screen has a number of options available, as seen here.

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The VPN Host Name field is used by administrators leveraging profiles. The setting used becomes the address for the VPN service in the Everyone profile. L2TP requires a shared secret or an SSL certificate. In this example, we’ll configure a shared secret by providing a password in the Shared Secret field. Additionally, there are three fields, each with an Edit button that allows for configuration:

  • Client Addresses: The dynamic pool of addresses provided when clients connect to the VPN.

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  • DNS Settings: The name servers used once a VPN client has connected to the server. As well as the Search Domains configuration.

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  • Routes: Select which interface (VPN or default interface of the client system) that a client connects to each IP address and subnet mask over.

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  • Save Configuration Profile: Use this button to export configuration profiles to a file, which can then be distributed to client systems (macOS using the profiles command, iOS using Apple Configurator or both using Profile Manager).
  • Shared Secret: A passphrase that must be supplied by the client prior to getting a username and password prompt.

Once configured, open incoming ports on the router/firewall. While deprecated(ish) PPTP runs over port 1723. L2TP is a bit more complicated, running over 1701, but also the IP-ESP protocol (IP Protocol 50). Both are configured automatically when using Apple AirPorts as gateway devices. Officially, the ports to forward are listed at http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1629.

Using The Command Line

I know, I’ve described ways to manage these services from the command line before. The serveradmin command can be used to manage the service as well as the Server app. The serveradmin command can start the service, using the default settings, with no further configuration being required:

sudo serveradmin start vpn

And to stop the service:

sudo serveradmin stop vpn

And to list the available options:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn

The output of which shows all of the VPN settings available via serveradmin (which is many more than what you see in the Server app:

vpn:vpnHost = "odr.krypted.com"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions = 128
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedSearchDomains:_array_index:0 = "jamfsw.corp"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:0 = "10.10.16.200"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:1 = "10.1.16.20"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:2 = "8.8.8.8"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:SharedSecret = "1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:Address = "1.1.1.1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:SharedSecret = "2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:Address = "2.2.2.2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:EAP:KerberosServicePrincipalName = "vpn/odr.krypted.com@OSXSERVER.KRYPTED.COM"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:enabled = no
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Interface:SubType = "PPTP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Interface:Type = "PPP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoFailure = 5
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorEAPPlugins:_array_index:0 = "EAP-RSA"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorACLPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSACL"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:CCPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:IPCPCompressionVJ = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:ACSPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:LCPEchoInterval = 60
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:MPPEKeySize128 = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorProtocol:_array_index:0 = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:MPPEKeySize40 = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:AuthenticatorPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSAuth"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdleTimer = 7200
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:PPP:CCPProtocols:_array_index:0 = "MPPE"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteMasks = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:0 = "10.10.23.255"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:1 = "10.10.23.254"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:OfferedRouteTypes = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:IPv4:ConfigMethod = "Manual"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:LoadBalancingAddress = "1.2.3.4"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:MaximumSessions = 128
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:LoadBalancingEnabled = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Server:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedSearchDomains:_array_index:0 = "jamfsw.corp"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:0 = "10.10.16.200"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:1 = "10.1.16.20"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:DNS:OfferedServerAddresses:_array_index:2 = "8.8.8.8"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:SharedSecret = "1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:0:Address = "1.1.1.1"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:SharedSecret = "2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Radius:Servers:_array_index:1:Address = "2.2.2.2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:EAP:KerberosServicePrincipalName = "vpn/odr.krypted.com@OSXSERVER.KRYPTED.COM"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = yes
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Interface:SubType = "L2TP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Interface:Type = "PPP"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoFailure = 5
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorEAPPlugins:_array_index:0 = "EAP-KRB"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorACLPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSACL"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:VerboseLogging = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:IPCPCompressionVJ = 0
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:ACSPEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoInterval = 60
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:LCPEchoEnabled = 1
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorProtocol:_array_index:0 = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:AuthenticatorPlugins:_array_index:0 = "DSAuth"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:Logfile = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdleTimer = 7200
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:SharedSecretEncryption = "Keychain"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:LocalIdentifier = ""
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:SharedSecret = "com.apple.ppp.l2tp"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:AuthenticationMethod = "SharedSecret"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:RemoteIdentifier = ""
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:IdentifierVerification = "None"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPSec:LocalCertificate = <>
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteMasks = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:0 = "10.10.23.128"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:DestAddressRanges:_array_index:1 = "10.10.23.254"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteAddresses = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:OfferedRouteTypes = _empty_array
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:IPv4:ConfigMethod = "Manual"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:Transport = "IPSec"
vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:IPSecSharedSecretValue = "Yq!XdGsVyAY?o;9jnj[X"

To disable L2TP, set vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled to no:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = no

To configure how long a client can be idle prior to being disconnected:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:PPP:DisconnectOnIdle = 10

By default, each protocol has a maximum of 128 sessions, configureable using vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions:

sudo serveradmin settings vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Server:MaximumSessions = 200

To see the state of the service, the pid, the time the service was configured, the path to the log files, the number of clients and other information, use the fullstatus option:

sudo serveradmin fullstatus vpn

Which returns output similar to the following:

vpn:servicePortsAreRestricted = "NO"
vpn:readWriteSettingsVersion = 1
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:AuthenticationProtocol = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:CurrentConnections = 0
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:enabled = yes
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:MPPEKeySize = "MPPEKeySize128"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:Type = "PPP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:SubType = "PPTP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.pptp:AuthenticatorPlugins = "DSAuth"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:AuthenticationProtocol = "MSCHAP2"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:Type = "PPP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:enabled = yes
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:CurrentConnections = 0
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:SubType = "L2TP"
vpn:servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:AuthenticatorPlugins = "DSAuth"
vpn:servicePortsRestrictionInfo = _empty_array
vpn:health = _empty_dictionary
vpn:logPaths:vpnLog = "/var/log/ppp/vpnd.log"
vpn:configured = yes
vpn:state = "STOPPED"
vpn:setStateVersion = 1

Security folk will be stoked to see that the shared secret is shown in the clear using:

vpn:Servers:com.apple.ppp.l2tp:L2TP:IPSecSharedSecretValue

Configuring Users For VPN Access

Each account that accesses the VPN server needs a valid account to do so. To configure existing users to use the service, click on Users in the Server app sidebar.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-14-23-pm

At the list of users, click on a user and then click on the cog wheel icon, selecting Edit Access to Services.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-14-44-pm

At the Service Access screen will be a list of services that could be hosted on the server; verify the checkbox for VPN is highlighted for the user. If not, click Manage Service Access, click Manage and then check the VPN box.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-15-02-pm

Setting Up Client Computers

As you can see, configuring the VPN service in macOS Server 5.2 (running on Sierra) is a simple and straight-forward process – much easier than eating your cereal with a fork and doing your homework in the dark.. Configuring clients is as simple as importing the profile generated by the service. However, you can also configure clients manually. To do so on a Mac, open the Network System Preference pane. From here, click on the plus sign (“+”) to add a new network service.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-17-20-pm

At the prompt, select VPN in the Interface field and then either PPTP or L2TP over IPSec in the VPN Type. Then provide a name for the connection in the Service Name field and click on Create.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-18-33-pm

At the list of network interfaces in the Network System Preference pane, provide the hostname or address of the server in the Server Address field and the username that will be connecting to the VPN service in the Account Name field. If using L2TP, click on Authentication Settings.

screen-shot-2016-09-29-at-9-18-05-pm

At the prompt, provide the password entered into the Shared Secret field earlier in this article in the Machine Authentication Shared Secret field and the user’s password in the User Authentication Password field. When you’re done, click OK and then provided you’re outside the network and routeable to the server, click on Connect to test the connection.

Conclusion

Setting Up the VPN service in macOS Server 5.2 is as simple as clicking the ON button. But much more information about using a VPN can be required. The natd binary is still built into OS X at /usr/sbin/natd and can be managed in a number of ways. And if you’re using an Apple AirPort as a router (hopefully in a very small environment) then the whole process of setting this thing up should be super-simple.

October 16th, 2016

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , , , ,

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