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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

An hour into my first Reddit AMA with some super-excellent JAMFs!

AMA w/ Charles Edge and the Apple management experts at JAMF Software from macsysadmin

June 24th, 2016

Posted In: Apple Configurator, Articles and Books, Business, iPhone, JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I’ve worked with a lot of organizations switching between Mobile Device Management (MDM) solutions in my career. And I’ve seen the migration projects go both really, really well, and really, really poorly. In most cases, the migration is somewhat painful no matter what you do. But in this (my first) article on the JAMF blog, I try and organize my thoughts around a few things to look out for when migrating between MDMs/MAMs, and some context/experience around those.

https://www.jamfsoftware.com/blog/10-things-to-consider-when-switching-between-mobile-device-management-solutions/

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June 23rd, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, iPhone, JAMF, Mac OS X

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Published an article at http://www.itbusinessedge.com/slideshows/10-must-have-apps-for-your-small-business.html on types of apps you should use when starting to put iPads in a small business. Obviously many a business has vertical needs, but a lot of apps are horizontal, so cut across a wide swath of industries.

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June 22nd, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, iPhone, JAMF

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Been awhile since I contributed any content to the wonderful Bushel team, so provided an article on accounting concepts that every small business owner should know. A sample:

To be a successful small business owner, you don’t need to be an accounting expert; you can outsource that. But you do need a solid grasp of basic accounting concepts. As a small business owner, you need more than an intuitive feel for the performance of your business. Understanding a few basic Accounting 101 concepts goes a long way towards keeping the goals for your company in alignment with your performance. Here are 5 accounting concepts to get you started:

Read More at http://blog.bushel.com/2016/06/5-accounting-concepts-small-business-owner-needs-know/

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June 18th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, iPhone, Mac OS X

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Posted a Huffington Post article from my notes from the WWDC keynote. Hope you enjoy!

Apple kicked off WWDC (World Wide Developers Conference) today, with a Keynote that showcased some of the upper tier of talent and management within Apple. As a former WWDC speaker, I watch the keynote and most sessions through the remainder of the week religiously. Here, you see what’s coming in the fall releases of the four operating systems: macOS, watchOS, iOS, and tvOS (for Macs, Apple Watches, iPhones and iPads, and Apple TVs respectively).

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PS: macOS autocorrects to tacos. Mmmmm, tacos…

June 14th, 2016

Posted In: Apple TV, Apple Watch, iPhone, JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server

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Under the hood on iOS is a hard place to get; especially without bricking or jailbreaking a device. There are a few tools that can provide insight into what’s on a device, and about the device, though. One is an app called SysSecInfo, available at https://www.sektioneins.de/en/blog/16-05-09-system-and-security-info.html.

Once installed, you’ll see how much CPU and memory are in use, and not in use, on your device.

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Scroll down and tap on Process List to see a list of each process running on the device.

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Tap Details towards the bottom of the screen to see more information about the OS build running on the device.

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Overall, a handle little tool, with lots of information about devices, including how to derive whether the device has been jailbroken (although note that for each method of jailbreak detection, there’s a method for defeating detection).

June 8th, 2016

Posted In: iPhone

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Here’s a little app to sync data from a DynamoDB database to an iOS device. Includes the ability to search. Simply edit the constants file to link it to your source. Enjoy.

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June 6th, 2016

Posted In: iPhone

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Exchange Online and Exchange 2010-2016 can block a device from accessing ActiveSync using a policy. To do so, first grab a list of all operating systems you’d like to block. To do so, first check which ones are out there using the Get-ActiveSyncDevice command, and looking at devicetype, deviceos, and deviceuseragent. This can be found using the following command:

Get-ActiveSyncDevice | select devicetype,deviceos,deviceuseragent

The command will show each of the operating systems that have accessed the server, including the user agent. You can block access based on each of these. In the following command, we’ll block one that our server found that’s now out of date:

New-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule -Characteristic DeviceOS -QueryString "iOS 8.1 12A369" -AccessLevel Block

To see all blocked devices, use

Get-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule | where {$_.AccessLevel -eq 'Block'}

If you mistakenly block a device, remove the block by copying it into your clipboard and then pasting into a Remove-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule commandlet:

Remove-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule -Characteristic DeviceOS -QueryString "iOS 8.1 12A369" -AccessLevel Block

Or to remove all the policies:

Get-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule | Remove-ActiveSyncDeviceAccessRule

May 25th, 2016

Posted In: iPhone, Microsoft Exchange Server

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A number of systems require you to use complex characters in passwords and passcodes. Here is a list of characters that can be used, along with the name and the associated unicode:

  •    (Space) U+0020
  • ! (Exclamation) U+0021
  • ” (Double quotes) U+0022
  • # (Number sign) U+0023
  • $ (Dollar sign) U+0024
  • % (Percent) U+0025
  • & (Ampersand) U+0026
  • ‘  (Single quotes) U+0027
  • ( (Left parenthesis) U+0028
  • ) (Right parenthesis) U+0029
  • * (Asterisk) U+002A
  • + (Plus) U+002B
  • , (Comma) U+002C
  • – (Minus sign) U+002D
  • . (Period) U+002E
  • / (Slash) U+002F
  • : (Colon) U+003A
  • ; (Semicolon) U+003B
  • < (Less than sign) U+003C (not allowed in all systems)
  • = (Equal sign) U+003D
  • > (Greater than sign) U+003E (not allowed in all systems)
  • ? (Question) U+003F
  • @ (At sign) U+0040
  • [ (Left bracket) U+005B
  • \ (Backslash) U+005C
  • ] (Right bracket) U+005D
  • ^ (Caret) U+005E
  • _ (Underscore) U+005F
  • ` (Backtick) U+0060
  • { (Left curly bracket/brace) U+007B
  • | (Vertical bar) U+007C
  • } (Right curly bracket/brace) U+007D
  • ~ (Tilde) U+007E

April 29th, 2016

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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Precache, available at https://github.com/krypted/precache, is a script that populates the cache on an OS X Caching server for Apple updates. The initial release supported iOS. The script now also supports caching the latest update for an AppleTV. To use that, there’s no need to include an argument for AppleTV. Instead, you would simply  run the script followed by the model identifier, as follows:

sudo python precache.py AppleTV5,4

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April 28th, 2016

Posted In: Apple TV, iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, precache

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