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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

<shameless self promotion>

Springer digital is running the two latest titles I wrote for them: Enterprise Mac Administrator’s Guide (Third Edition) and Enterprise Mac Security: Mac OS X (Third Edition) in a special Kindle promotion on Amazon until May 31st, 2016. For a limited time, the ebooks will be priced at $18.99 in US, Canadian, and Australian markets, and 10.99GBP in UK.

Th books are available at http://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Administrators-Guide-CHARLES-EDGE/dp/1484217055/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1460471210&sr=8-1&keywords=9781484217054 for the Enterprise Mac Administrator’s Guide and http://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Mac-Security-OS-Third-ebook/dp/B016PXSH8W/ref=sr_1_1_twi_kin_1?s=instant-video&ie=UTF8&qid=1460471152&sr=8-1&keywords=Enterprise+Mac+Security%3A+Mac+OS+X+%28Third+Edition%29 for Enterprise Mac Security: Mac OS X.

We are also extending the sale of these iOs titles through the iBooks/iTunes platform also, so stay tuned! 🙂

</shameless self promotion>

May 20th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books

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Apple School Manager is a portal used to create classes, import students, manage Managed Apple IDs, and link all these things together. You can use a Student Information System (SIS) to create these classes, import students, etc. But, only if you have a SIS with an API that Apple links to. If you don’t, you’ll need to import data using csv files. And you’ll need to import four csv files: Classes, Instructors, Staff, and of course Students.

Many schools will already have this data in Active Directory or another LDAP-based solution. Here, we’ll look at getting the information out of Active Directory and into csv. The LDIFDE utility exports and imports objects from and to Active Directory using the ldif format, which is kinda’ like csv when it gets really drunk and can’t stay on one line. Luckily, ldif can’t drive. Actually, each attribute/field is on a line (which allows for arrays) and an empty line starts the next record. Which can make for a pretty messy looking file the first time you look at one. The csvde command can be used to export data into the csv format instead. In it’s simplest form the ldifde command can be used to export Active Directory objects just using a -f option to specify the location (the working directory that we’re running the ldifde command from if using powershell to do so or remove .\ if using a standard command prompt):

ldifde -f .\ADExport.ldf

This exports all attributes of all objects, which overlap with many in a target Active Directory and so can’t be imported. Therefore, you have to limit the scope of what you’re exporting, which you can do in a few ways. The first is to only export a given OU (in this case called Students, but you could do one for Teachers, one for each grade, etc). To limit, you’ll define a dn with a -d flag followed by the actual dn of the OU you’re exporting and then you’d add a -p for subtree. In the following example we’ll export all of the objects from the sales OU to the StudentsOUExport.ldf file:

ldifde -d "OU=Students,DC=krypted,DC=local" -p subtree -f .\StudentsOUExport.ldf

Once you have the ldif file, you’ll want to convert it from ldif to csv. Some apps to do so:

Once you have the file in csv form, you can import it using the Apple School Manager web interface.

April 22nd, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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My first article on Entrepreneur is out! This is a piece on lessons about running a business that I learned from… Superheroes. So continuing the overarching theme of linking business, technology, and what we in those realms are actually interested in! These articles evolve once they go to the publisher, which is fun for me to watch as well. Anyway, I hope you enjoy. As usual, a sample, and a photo (many of these are for my own library, btw).

“Batman v Superman” set a record in late March for the biggest superhero movie international opening ever (negative reviews aside, as parodied in the “Sad Affleck” video that’s closing in on 20 million hits as of this writing). Superheroes are serious business, in more ways than you might think.

Comics, movies and TV shows have taught me a bunch of lessons. For example, growing up without much diversity in my community, I learned about racism from reading the X-Men. But the most surprising lessons relate to the business world.

A list of some lessons that can be taught by a dozen of our favorite superheroes:

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Click here to read about the lessons (and the powers/flaws of our favorite characters)! https://www.entrepreneur.com/slideshow/273638

April 11th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books

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My latest post on Huffington Post is “From Dungeon Master to Scrum Master: 15 Software Development Lessons from Dungeons and Dragons” and is a bit of a revamp of my D&D article from here, but geared towards SCRUM mastering and managing Software Development teams. You may find it fun and kitschy or you may find it dumb. I’m kinda’ ok with both (I’m learning that I can’t make all the people happy all the time).

A sampling of that article:

I started playing Dungeons and Dragons in about the 5th or 6th grade. I didn’t get good at it for a while, but once I did, I didn’t play much longer (insert reference to “The Best Days of My Life” here.) Dungeons and Dragons taught me a few lessons that I didn’t realize would turn out to be great life lessons, until I was much older. This childhood game taught me life lessons that I would eventually apply to the business world – more specifically, the world of software development – and I know I’m not alone. In fact, there is a distinct possibility that many a developer got their start scoping out character sheets, and many a Scrum Master began as a Dungeon Master.

Here are a few of the lessons I took away from those carefree days. And yes, this image is from a box set sitting on my table at home. Don’t judge.

1. Build a great campaign, and if the game is good, expect your players to break it. 

In software, we design workflows. Then, users take routes we never thought possible. You build a product, sell the product and potentially service the product long-term. Maybe it sells, maybe it doesn’t – but if you’re not ready for the sales to happen, you won’t sell that much. How much work do you put into building a campaign, or game, in Dungeons and Dragons, if the characters are just going to go right off your script? How much effort do you put into building a business if the customers are just going to buy something from you that is completely different than what you thought you were going to sell? These are the same questions, and there’s no right answer to either (although there are many wrong answers). Understand that when momentum strikes, if you don’t have a good campaign built that is flexible, you won’t maintain that momentum. And if you haven’t thought of all the various routes a user can take around your software, you’re going to have a bunch of lost paladins mucking around in swamps with no monsters!

To read more, click here.

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<3

April 10th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Product Management

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Trying our best to get better, like if you were to watch Star Wars Episodes I through VI, the MacAdmins podcast now has an Episode II. No Jar Jar, but I’m there, so close enough!

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Find it at http://podcast.macadmins.org/2016/04/04/episode-2-in-depth-with-ios-9-3/

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April 5th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, MacAdmins Podcast, Mass Deployment

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MacDevOps 2016: f you’re interested in the scripting side of the Apple world and can make it from June 20th to 21st, this might just be the conference for you. At MacDevOps, you’ll see “Speakers from across North America and Europe will be presenting on a number of topics related to Mac administration and deployment.” This would be things like contributing to open source projects, packaging Django web apps to look like native Mac apps, osquery, Munki security, imagr, autopkg, ansible, git, and jenkins. Basically, automating the things: DevOps. And for Macs. Or Appley things. For now.

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And… Lots of fun people will be there. including the convergence of friends from other industries who don’t know that each other know me (nor would they likely care – other than to trade stories about how I made them drink something-or-other), which is kinda’ cool.  Anyway, Mathieu’s awesome. You should check this out.

April 3rd, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, personal

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I’ve been thinking a lot about content strategy and the why and when of how articles are posted. I’ll keep writing whatever I want, whenever, often times based on what I happen to be working on at that moment. In other words, I actually have no content strategy for krypted, and I don’t feel the need to implement one. But at least I explored it, thought about it, and got a few notes down for friends who do want one, or are thinking about it. That article went up on Huffington Post yesterday at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/charles-edge/the-importance-of-having-_2_b_9563304.html. A snippet of the article:

Search engine optimization (SEO) involves strategies and techniques that, when used properly, increases the amount of people that come to your website via search engines, like Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft Bing. Getting enough content, and more importantly the right content, on your site is your content strategy. As a business owner you always need to try new, interesting, and interactive ways to promote your company. And one of the best things you can do is to create a good content strategy for your organization’s website.

A business owner, or marketing employee in a small business is likely to wear a lot of hats. In large companies, there are often teams of people creating, editing, releasing, and strategizing what content to create on a website. How does a smaller organization compete for a similar audience? A good content strategy at a small business can help keep you focused and provide a unique experience to your readers. You can get material out faster than if articles have to pass through multiple layers of approval before going public. Timely pieces can mean getting to audiences before the competition can catch up. And having a personable and authentic voice can keep readers coming back to your site.

Not only does a good content strategy allow you to take your business to the next level, but it also offers a wide range of other benefits, as you can see below!

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Click here to read more…

The one point I didn’t think to make was once you have a good content strategy in place, it becomes much easier to outsource the creation of content. You can bring in professional content creators (writers). And then you can hopefully just edit their work. I’ve never had the greatest of luck with that, so I just keep writing stuffs. But I know a lot of people who have, and a lot of people that do this work, and do it really… really… well!

March 30th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Interviewing, Mass Deployment, Product Management, public speaking, Small Business

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I wrote an article for CBSPulse called “10 IT Resolutions To Consider For Your Small Business”:

Every company at some point needs to harness its technology. These days, a good Internet connection and some smart choices will have any company humming along with tools that help the business.

But it’s also important to reevaluate your strategy from time to time to ensure that you are making the most from your processes and investments. As 2016 continues to speed along, now is great time to step back to identify what’s working and what can be done better. The following are ten resolutions for small businesses to consider as you look for new ways to improve upon, save money from, and benefit from your IT.

Continue reading at http://cbspulse.com/2016/02/23/10-it-resolutions-consider-small-business/

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February 26th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Small Business

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The title of this one ended up a bit more FUDy than I’d prefer, but the content’s mostly what I provided.

With the rise of SMB-friendly backup solutions like CrashPlan, Carbonite, Mozy, and Backblaze, small businesses will choose to back up their systems with alternatives to expensive tape libraries, software to drive those libraries, and countless hours spent restoring files. As more cloud-based security attacks happen, businesses will realize that having a solid backup is one of the most important aspects to device security.

Read more: http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2016/02/03/executive-viewpoint-2016-prediction-bushel-major-security-breaches-will-change-how-small-?page=0,1#ixzz3zGet80fK

Oh, and in case anyone (Mosen/Dials) is bothered by the fact that I’m reblogging articles I do above and beyond what I do on Krypted, it’s my way of keeping track of all my other writings. And no, while I do write for Huff Post now, I don’t smoke weed (like ever). But thanks for your perspectives, I’ll try and up my game since you feel my contributions to the community were not enough while I was writing three books on Mac management (two are now shipping, the third will be shortly)… 😉

Oh, and I was serious about doing a long-term podcast. Now that my after-hours schedule is freeing up, I’m game to get on that! <3

February 5th, 2016

Posted In: Articles and Books, Bushel

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I started working at JAMF a little over a year and a half ago. And one of my favorite things about the on boarding process here is the emphasis on continuing education that was handed down to me. I was given two books to read on my first day. Then, during my get-the-cool-aid on boarding (aka Zero Month), I had a couple of pretty rad JAMFs go through a list of books they felt were essential and review the books from my first day. Theeeen, I had meetings with Co-Founder and CEO at the time Chip Pearson, where he would stop meetings and order me books. It was a book nerd’s heaven I tell ya’.

And like other heavenly nerd things, I thought I’d share it with you here. So here’s 25 good business books that I either read or re-read since I’ve been here (in no specific order):

The Blue Ocean Strategy. This book outlines a specific market condition they call a “red ocean”, which is when a market is so saturated that the players in that market start to drop prices and engage in cut-throat tactics. The premise is that rather than entering a market with the same product that everyone else has, you might as well look for a different market. I’ll expand this and say a different market segment as well. It’s a delightful and quick read. Very interesting little book, and much more business than you’d think given the tone (which makes the prose easy to get through).

The Idea Factory: When I was in college, I wanted to lead R&D at Bell Labs. Or Xerox. This is the story of Bell and all the breakthroughs and ideas they came up with. It’s a fantastic little book. And a must-read for those who want to play the innovation game.

Startup CEO: There are so many things that a lot of books on how to start a business, or write a business plan, or go get VC don’t cover. This is really a tacticians look at starting a company or business unit. It’s concise and easy to read, with real life examples and tons of things that I’ve seen first hand. I’m not sure you can truly appreciate it until you’ve been there a couple of times, but if you have it’s great to know you’re not the only one!

Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance: Before IBM was a juggernaut, it was a juggernaut. But between those two stages, IBM was in serious peril. Then Louis Gerstner came and changed what IBM was, how IBM operated, and helped to turn them into a new kind of awesome. When he retired, he wrote this book. While it’s part euphoric recall, anyone who wonders WTF in big companies should read this book. I think it helped me better understand why some of the things that used to frustrate me happen, and understand more about what it takes to run a truly global organization.

Getting Naked: This was a pretty weird business book. Because it was written like a piece of fiction. I appreciated the change-up after a year of reading so many books on business. The thesis is really that you should be in touch with yourself and your clients in a very Jerry Maguire way. It’s simple, but an easy read with a few really good points to take away (such as not to scoff at the competition when they do seemingly hippy things).

Guerilla Marketing Weapons: 100 tips on getting more out of marketing. ‘Cause who doesn’t want that? If you read this, keep a notepad handy. It’s got a lot of basic, easy things. But it’s got a lot of ideas that you’ll want to capture while they’re fresh as well.

Notes to a Software Team Leader: This book is about self organizing teams. ‘Cause developers don’t need managers as much as we seem to think. But they do need structure, like all teams.

Trust Me, I’m Lying: PR gone wrong. There’s a lot of great tips in this book from a “don’t do this” standpoint. Euphoric recall as a teaching mechanism. The dark side of PR.

Crossing the Chasm: This book is about how some tech companies go mainstream (and uber-profitable) and how some just don’t. There is a chasm between early adoption and mainstream. Why? How do you keep from getting caught in it? Great items this book does a great job covering. If you’re in the startup/innovation/tech scene, you simply have to read this book; it’s a classic.

The Art of the Start: Another classic (one I wish I’d of read years earlier), Guy Kawasaki takes aim at startups, looking to secure VC or bootstrap. Lots of great tips. Lots of good stories. From a veteran of the startup community, just without the grizzled aspects many of the veterans can get.

Enchantment: I’m just gonna’ throw in another book. This one tells the story of how Kawasaki got his start at Apple and has some parallels drawn between his time in the jewelry industry and marketing. It’s a good book. If you only have time for one of his books, read Art of the Start. If you have time for two, get Enchantment.

The Icarus Deception: Play it safe? Listen to the smart people? Sure. Don’t fly too low either. But make your own way. It’s a great title from Seth Godin. And check out his blog here.

Ideas Are Free: This book caused me to setup meetings with people who would never think of tag lines and other creative items. I had mixed results, but it was abso-frickin’-lutely worth it. Not only do non-creatives have lots of good ideas, they also have lots of great responses to being included.

Delivering Happiness: How does Zappos end up with such a fanatical fan base? Support. If you’ve ever returned something to Zappos, you know what I mean. Everything about shopping there is a great experience. Not everyone can expend the resources they do, as support isn’t as integral a part of their strategy as it is at Zappos. But there are lots of

The Innovator’s Dilemma: The thesis: there are waves of innovation and you have to keep releasing disruptive tech to stay on those waves. If you listen to customers too much, you might miss out. If you don’t go downmarket eventually someone else will. If you don’t read this book, you won’t get all these fantastic tips.

The Lean Startup: Fail fast. It’s a good thesis to a book. Don’t fail too fast. I think they forgot to tell you when the breaking point is. But there are lots of stories and tips in this book that can help any fledgling product or business. And it’s well worth the time and money. Probably my second favorite book on the list.

Rework: Why schedule a 60 minute meeting when a 15 minute meeting (er, spike) will do? Lots of great little tips in this book from the people behind 37 Signals and Ruby.

Rookie Smarts: Liz Wiseman loves putting newbies into roles and seeing how they do. And she’s had success at it. In this book, there’s a bit of a simplistic approach to that (not everyone can sit in every chair in a growing company). But the most important aspect of this book is that she defined a few types of people or places in life that “rookies” are and how you can engage those specific groups best. this was probably my favorite part of the whole book.

Keeping Up with the Quants: Stats for marketing professionals. Unlike many of the books where there’s a thesis and then a lot of proving the thesis, this one is more of a longer collection of definitions, simple statistical formulas, etc.

Marketing In The Age Of Google: The general thesis of this thing is that content is king. Write a lot of good stuff that people want to link to and your product will get natural listings that are hard to displace. There’s other good little tips here and there, but that’s the key message. There, saved ya’ some time. 🙂

Growth Hacker Marketing: This is my favorite book on the list (like I said, no particular order). A fresh, interesting, cool, personal approach to getting your product branding in front of people. Some ideas cost a little. Some cost a lot. It’s great stuff. A must read in my humble opinion.

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Traction: A bit of a slow paced book, but (pun intended) it gains traction as it goes. The Entrepreneurial Operating System is a bit much for me. But when explaining it, there are a lot of really amazing lessons that you have to learn. Some you learn the hard way, some you learn in this book.

Permission Marketing: Another Seth Godin book, this one focusing on using surveys, samples, contests, sales, and other marketing techniques to get in front of customers. The Purple Cow isn’t on this list, as I read it a long time ago. If you haven’t read it, check it out. If you have, check this out.

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Things to do and not to do when marketing. Don’t send too many emails. Don’t send things that people don’t care about. But the most important part of this book, and pretty much the central thesis is to match with forces in the market. If you don’t do that, you won’t be able to get in sync with what customers want and how to grab their attention.

Managing Humans: We were excited when Michael Lopp, who wrote this book, joined the board of JAMF Software. In part, it was because Zach (co-founder of JAMF) and I both hero worshipped his writing. This is a great book, and his blog is great as well!

 

December 29th, 2015

Posted In: Articles and Books, Business

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