krypted.com

Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Before December 30th of 2004, krypted.com was a site with some flat files of notes I’d taken. During the Holiday break that year, I finally converted it into a blog. And now, with over 3,500 posts and netting around 10,000 unique visitors a day, it’s very different. It started out as just some musings and technical notes. Now, it’s… Well, some musings and technical notes.

Actually, back then I’d occasionally write about college football (Go Dawgs!), a lot more about Windows (um, Windows NT sometimes – ick!), and an increasing amount about macOS Server. These days I post less, but I write as much as I ever did. Just more are links to articles I’ve written for other places (Medium, Huffington Post, Inc.com, Jamf, etc). Also, there’s more that’s up on GitHub and contributions to projects at work and for various vendors we all know and love. And there’s more structure, as with the macOS Server guides. Overall, I still love to write, just my interests shift here and there. 



Anyway, Happy Birthday, krypted.com!

And a Happy New Year to those who observe tomorrow as the end of the year!

Much love,

Charles

December 30th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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My latest Inc.com post, on running successful email marketing campaigns, is available at https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/10-email-marketing-campaign-tips-to-keep-subscribers-attract-new-ones.html. It starts like this:
It seems like every time I turn on the radio, there’s an ad for an email marketing automation tool. Constant Contact, Mailchimp, Emma, iContact and even Salesforce make it pretty easy for small and mid-size businesses to automate beautiful emails. Or for larger organizations, there are offerings like Marketo, Adobe Marketing Cloud and Eloqua. But while the ads make it sound like these campaigns write themselves, they don’t.

Email marketing is a delicate business. On one hand, you don’t want to be an evil spammer. On the other, email is an efficient way to stay in touch with potential and existing customers. I’ve been involved in many email campaigns through the years. Here’s what I’ve learned:

1. Choose an email automation tool that fits the size of your marketing team. Many of the more robust products really need a staff person at the reins. If you can’t afford someone in that position, then turn your attention toward simpler software that requires little overhead.
Read more…

December 12th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

My latest Huffington Post article, called 20 Constants In Software Development is up. It starts out like this:

There are so many things I wish people had told me when I was in school, or earlier in my career. Things that aren’t variable between organizations you work with, or even teams you work in. So I thought I’d jot a few down of these for software development teams (if only to prove that no, despite what product managers say, you aren’t crazy). So here goes:

  1. A project will never have enough people to build all the features you want. Period.
  2. Less features means fewer defects.
  3. As a software project nears completion the amount of work remaining rises in proportion to how many hacks and shortcuts you took.
Read more…

December 11th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books, Programming

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I stepped a little outside of the business and tech sphere and published an article on… sexual misconduct and partisanship. If it’s you’re kinda’ thing, it starts out like:

I’m a tech writer. I write about #nerdstuff. As a rule, I don’t write about politics. But this isn’t political. This is about sexual harassment and assault, something we should have zero tolerance for in our politics.

To read more, click here

December 8th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

My latest piece on Inc.com was 6 Ways to Win Friends and Influence People as a New Manager
It starts a bit like:

Call it the New Sheriff in Town Syndrome.

You’re a new manager at an established company or your own startup. You think of yourself as a fixer, so you quickly set out to implement changes or new processes, often bringing in ideas from your old company.

Whoops.

While making improvements should be the goal of any manager, you need to be careful. It’s easy to come across as over-aggressive and disruptive, and you could end up alienating many of your colleagues.

To read more…

December 1st, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books, Small Business

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My latest article is now available on Huffington Post. It goes a bit like this:

Source code is a collection of computer commands and comments written in a programming language, like Java, C or Swift. When compiled, the raw source code is then no longer human readable but runs very efficiently. Because compiled code isn’t easily disassembled, people cannot create their own versions of the software.

That Was Then…

Once upon a time, organizations needed a copy of source code, in case a software vendor went out of business. Software vendors didn’t want to give up source code, but no one can ever guarantee they won’t go out of business. So much like putting funds into an account in a real estate deal, this allowed organizations to trust that they could get access to source for mission critical apps in the event that the software vendor went under. I remember working with one such organization back in the 90s.

To read more, click here…

November 30th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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My latest Inc column, “The Holiday Traffic Rush Is Right Around the Corner. Here Are 10 Useful Tips to Help You Prepare” is now available on Inc.com. It begins like:

It’s baaaack! The holiday peak season for retailers is almost here.

By the time jack-o’-lanterns start to appear on front stoops, businesses’ preparations for this busiest period of the year should be well underway.

In 2016, holiday sales represented nearly 20 percent of total retail industry sales nationwide for the year, according to the National Retail Federation.

To read more, see https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/holiday-traffic-rush-is-right-around-corner-here-are-ten-useful-tips-to-help-you-prepare.html.

October 6th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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My latest @Inc article is now online at 

https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/complacency-is-a-curse-heres-how-to-avoid-it.html. This piece focuses on what to do when things are going really good in an organization: more work! 

It starts a little like this:

Running a company can be really hard. But when everything lines up just right, you hit a stride.

The business feels like a well-oiled machine and almost seems to run itself. This is true not just for startup entrepreneurs but also for people who lead departments in larger organizations.

But of course, business is never really easy. Just when you’re riding the wave, a crash always lurks up ahead.

So if you’re fortunate enough to be in a positive place with your business, understand that this is the very time to become uncomfortable and take a hard look at every aspect of the operation.

A business should always be thinking about how to reinvent, even when the revenue is rolling in and morale is high.

September 13th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books, Business

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My latest inc.com piece is available at https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/your-employees-want-extra-training-but-youre-going-to-have-to-help-them-get-star.html. It starts off like this, if it’s your kinda’ thing:
Employee engagement is dipping, according to a new study by human resources consultancy Aon Hewitt, but as an manager, you can make the workplace more appealing through positive initiatives such as employee training and development. Indeed, I’ve often had people I manage ask for more training. My answer is always an emphatic “yes.” But then something funny often happens: nothing. Giving staff approval for trainingdoesn’t necessarily mean that they’ll do it unless you follow up methodically and even micromanage the process. Why does this happen and what does it show about how employers and employees alike can do a better job to make sure development happens? I have five theories.

July 7th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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My latest @inc piece is up at https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/5-ways-your-it-staff-can-make-your-business-more-tech-savvy.html.
Remember Nick Burns, the “company computer guy” played by Jimmy Fallon on “Saturday Night Live”? IT people have long been fixtures in the office (though hopefully seldom as grumpy as Nick). However, their jobs have been radically changed by two trends — the cloud and consumerization. The cloud has amplified what a small business can do by moving the physical server and network infrastructure that staff or consultants used to be needed to manage, to off-premises locations.
To read more, see https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/5-ways-your-it-staff-can-make-your-business-more-tech-savvy.html.

June 22nd, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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