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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

April 23rd, 2017

Posted In: iPhone, MacAdmins Podcast, Mass Deployment

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MySQL usually pulls settings from a my.cnf file. However, you can end up with settings in include files, which can be defined in the my.cnf using the following directives:

include /home/mydir/myopt.cnf
includedir /home/mydir

Because of this, and the fact that you might not have access to all locations of .cnf files on a filesystem, you can also grab them using the SHOW VARIABLES option within SQL, obtained by

/usr/local/mysql/bin/mysql -uroot -p mypassword -e "SHOW VARIABLES;" > /tmp/SQLSettings.txt

In the above command, -uroot defines we’ll be accessing with the root user, -p defines the password (listed as mypassword) and the -e defines that we want to execute a command and then quit. We then use > to dump the output into the defined file.

April 21st, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, SQL

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10.12.4 gives us a new option to recheck enrollment via DEP! You can now use the -N flag to recheck a DEP configuration and, if a computer is not enrolled in the correct listing, move the enrollment. This should makes of r an ability to move devices between server, change the URL string in an enrollment profile, and recheck for the removal of an enrollment profile.

To use the option, simply run profiles with the -N option (with elevated privileges):

sudo profiles -N

For the Mac, there are a lot of ways to programmatically handle enrollment, so this is a nice new feature, but not a game changer. But, while not yet available in iOS, if the same functionality could be had with, say, a MDM command, then you would be able to migrate iOS devices between MDMs, provided you already put the data in place so policies ran as expected.

April 18th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

There’s a macOS tool called AssetCacheLocatorUtil located at /usr/bin/AssetCacheLocatorUtil. The output is in… stderr. Because stderr is so fun to work with (note that sed -i only works with stdin). So, to update the caching server(s) you are using and only print the IP address of those, you’d do the following:

/usr/bin/AssetCacheLocatorUtil 2>&1 | grep guid | awk '{print$4}' | sed 's/^\(.*\):.*$/\1/' | uniq

If you use Jamf Pro and would like to use this as an extension attribute, that’s posted here: https://github.com/krypted/cachecheck. I didn’t do any of the if/then there, as I’d usually just do that on the JSS.

April 17th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac Security, Mass Deployment, Network Infrastructure, precache

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I recently had an issue where QuickLook was crashing every time I clicked on certain file types. I thought they were unsupported by QuickLook. But it turns out that they were animated and trying to start while the QuickLook animation was starting. So disable the QuickLook animation and the files appeared as intended. To do so, write a key called QLPanelAnimationDuration into the global defaults database, with a -float value of 0, as follows:

defaults write -g QLPanelAnimationDuration -float 0

April 16th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X

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April 13th, 2017

Posted In: MacAdmins Podcast

After updating an iPhone, maybe it’s stuck. Doesn’t happen much, but it can happen. When it does, it’s great if you’ve got a backup of your phone. And those traditional means of restarting, resetting, and restoring don’t work any more. Or at least they do, but they’ve moved.

If you need to DFU or restore your device, starts by plugging the phone into a computer running iTunes. Then press and hold the power button down for 3 seconds and press the volume down button while you’re holding that power button. Hold both down for about 10 seconds and let go of the power button, holding the volume down button for 5 more seconds.

This process is pretty specific and I’ve often had to do it 3-4 times to get it just right. If you see the Apple logo at boot, the device is just rebooting (and that’s usually all I’ve needed). But if you really need it to go into restore or DFU-mode, you’ll want to see the screen that says Plug Into iTunes. Once you see that, you are in restore mode. If you want to be in DFU mode, you’ll want it right in the middle, where the screen is black.

April 11th, 2017

Posted In: iPhone

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April 6th, 2017

Posted In: MacAdmins Podcast

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There are two useful commands when scripting operations that involve filenames and paths. The first of these is dirname: dirname can be used to return the directory portion of a path. The second is basename: basename can be used to output the file name portion of a path.

For our first example, let’s say that we have an output of /users/krypted, which we know to be the original short name of my user. To just see just that username, we could use basename to call it:

basename /users/charlesedge

Basename can also be used to trim output. For example, let’s say there was a document called myresume.pdf in my home folder and we wanted to grab that without the file extension. We could run basename using the -s option, followed by the string at the end that we do not want to see to output of (the file extension:

basename -s .pdf /users/charlesedge/myresume.pdf

The dirname command is even more basic. It outputs the directory portion of the file’s path. For example, based on the same string, the following would tell you what directory the user is in:

dirname /users/charlesedge

A great example of when this gets more useful is keying off of currently active data. For example, if we’re scripting a make operation, we can use the which command to get an output that just contains the path to the make binary:

which make

We can then wrap that for expansion and grab just the place that the active make binary is stored:

dirname `which make`

This allows us to key other operations off the path of an object. A couple of notable example of this is home or homeDirectory paths and then breaking up data coming into a script via a positional parameter (e.g. $1).

You can also use variables as well. Let’s say that

homedir=/users/krypted ; dirname $homedir

Finally, keep in mind that dirname is relative, so if you’re calling it for ~/ then you’ll see the output at that relative path.

April 5th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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The original title of this piece didn’t last long. That’s too bad. ‘Cause I thought “Getting Bloggers To Talk About Your Crap” was kinda’ fun. But my latest inc.com article ended up getting called “6 Ways To Build Successful Relationships With Online Influencers” – and that’s fine. If you wanna’ check it out, it’s at: http://www.inc.com/charles-edge/6-ways-to-build-successful-relationships-with-bloggers.html.

April 4th, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books

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