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Tiny Deathstars of Foulness

Added 3 new flags into precache tonight: –jamfserver, –jamfuser, and –jamfpassword. These are used to provide a Jamf Pro server (or cloud instance), the username to an account that can list the mobile devices on that server, and a password to that account respectively.

Basically, when you provide these, the script will pull a unique set of models and then precache updates for them. It’s similar to grabbing a list of devices:

curl -s -u myuser:mypassword https://myserver.jamfcloud.com/JSSResource/mobiledevices

And then piping the output of a device list to:

perl -lne 'BEGIN{undef $/} while (/<model_identifier>(.*?)<\/model_identifier>/sg){print $1}'

And then running that array as an input to precache.py. Hope this helps make the script more useful!

May 13th, 2017

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X Server

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I covered managing devices based on policy in http://krypted.com/microsoft-exchange-server/manage-activesync-policies-on-ios-using-powershell-in-exchange-2016/. One of those policies is “modern authentication”, Azure Passthrough Authentication, or OAuth if you will. To enable it, log into Exchange Online via PowerShell and run the set-OrganizationConfig to set -OAuth2ClientProfileEnabled to True:

Set-OrganizationConfig -OAuth2ClientProfileEnabled $true

If you’re using Skype, do an override:

Set-CsOAuthConfiguration -ClientAdalAuthOverride Allowed

Now check that OAuth was enabled properly:

Get-CsOAuthConfiguration

And viola, you’ve caught up to where WordPress was at with OAuth 8 years ago! Next, check the global ADFS authentication rule:

Get-AdfsAdditionalAuthenticationRule

And you can use Set-AdfsAdditionalAuthenticationRule. Now, you should be able to check the ADFS rules required for a given MFA requirement:

Get-AdfsRelyingPartyTrust –Name "Krypted"

And then if necessary, set them:

Set-AdfsRelyingPartyTrust –TargetRelyingParty Krypted –AdditionalAuthenticationRules ‘c: [Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/groupsid", Value == "S-1-5-21-Insert your Group SID here"] && [Type == "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2012/01/insidecorporatenetwork", Value == "false"] => issue(Type = "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/authenticationmethod", Value = "http://schemas.microsoft.com/claims/multipleauthn");’

You can then check groups:

GetADGroup -Identity "Krypted Users"

May 9th, 2017

Posted In: Microsoft Exchange Server, Network Infrastructure, Windows Server

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Builtin commands are always kinda’ interesting. At first glance, it’s hard to know which commands are builtins. Luckily, there’s a command that I rarely use, called… command. If you run command with the -V flag it will tell you if the command is a builtin:

command -V cd

cd is a shell builtin

If you run a command that isn’t a builtin

command -V ls

ls is /bin/ls

Some builtins are in /bin (like echo). But not all builtins are in /bin. Some are in /usr/bin (like cd). Information about how to use builtins is built into the help command rather than standalone man pages. So, if you do help followed by the name of a command, you’ll get information about the command, and sometimes how to use the command:

help cd

cd: cd [-L|-P] [dir]
Change the current directory to DIR. The variable $HOME is the
default DIR. The variable CDPATH defines the search path for
the directory containing DIR. Alternative directory names in CDPATH
are separated by a colon (:). A null directory name is the same as
the current directory, i.e. `.’. If DIR begins with a slash (/),
then CDPATH is not used. If the directory is not found, and the
shell option `cdable_vars’ is set, then try the word as a variable
name. If that variable has a value, then cd to the value of that
variable. The -P option says to use the physical directory structure
instead of following symbolic links; the -L option forces symbolic links
to be followed.

There are also commands not in a path, which can be found using the which command:

which dsconfigad

/usr/sbin/dsconfigad

May 6th, 2017

Posted In: bash, Mac OS X

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My latest Inc.com piece is about collaborating on documents was just published.

Collaboration is a huge business buzzword these days. And nowhere does that feel more real than when teams work together on written materials.

Whether it’s a sales brochure or an internal proposal, teams must work well together to produce high-quality assets. This can be a challenge if the team members work in different locations.

Good habits in creating and editing documents can foster collaboration, save time and reduce headaches.

If this is the kind of thing you’re interested in, check it out at https://www.inc.com/charles-edge/how-to-collaborate-without-driving-the-rest-of-your-team-crazy.html.

May 2nd, 2017

Posted In: Articles and Books, Business

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If you’re in need of MDM in Japanese or German, Jamf Now shipped support for those languages last week. To switch languages, click on your name once logged in, and then click on the language you would like to use.

Enjoy.

May 1st, 2017

Posted In: iPhone, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security, Mass Deployment

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I mentioned mdmclient when I gave the talk on the inner workings of Mobile Device Management, or MDM. There, I spent a lot of time on APNs and profiles, but just kinda’ spoke about mdmclient in terms of it being the agent that runs on macOS to provide mdm parity for the Mac. The mdmclient binary is located at /usr/libexec/mdmclient and provides pretty limited access to see how the Mac reacts to and interprets information coming from a device management provider.

I had been meaning to do a write-up on mdmclient and document what it can do since it first shipped. But as luck would have it, @Mosen on the Slacks beat me to the punch with a fantastic resource at https://mosen.github.io/profiledocs/troubleshooting/mdmclient.html. So here I’d like to focus on just 3 examples of using mdmclient. The first is to see what insight an MDM has to the applications installed (whether that information is actually committed to a database somewhere or not) using QueryInstalledApps:

/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryInstalledApps

Here, we can see an array output of each bundle installed:

{BundleSize = 27457223;
Identifier = “com.hipchat.HipChat”;
Name = HipChat;
ShortVersion = “3.1.6”;
Version = “3.1.6”;}

Now, we can end up with duplicates, and so focus on just the unique Identifier keys, as follows:

/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryInstalledApps | grep Identifier | uniq

The second iteration is to see installed profiles. The most basic of these, is to see user profiles, which can be obtained using QueryInstalledProfiles, as follows:

/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryInstalledProfiles

Now, I could see using the profiles command with the -L option that I have a profile to configure office365 on my machine:

profiles -L

charlesedge[1] attribute: profileIdentifier: com.jamfsw.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328
There are 1 user configuration profiles installed for ‘charlesedge’

So to see what that same information looks like, when queried from an MDM solution:
/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryInstalledProfiles

QueryInstalledProfiles then returns:

({HasRemovalPasscode = 0;
IsEncrypted = 0;
PayloadContent = (
{PayloadDisplayName = “Charles Edge’s Office 365”;
PayloadIdentifier = “com.jamfsw.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328.exchange.a5f2ccd9-ea86-11e3-b1e0-6476bab5f328”;
PayloadType = “com.apple.ews.account”;
PayloadUUID = “a5f2ccd9-ea86-11e3-b1e0-6476bab5f328”;
PayloadVersion = 1;});
PayloadDescription = “This will configure your Office 365 account for your Mac.”;
PayloadDisplayName = “Charles Edge’s Office 365”;
PayloadIdentifier = “com.jamfsw.office365.a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328”;
PayloadOrganization = “JAMF Software”;
PayloadRemovalDisallowed = 0;
PayloadUUID = “a5f0e328-ea86-11e3-a26c-6476bab5f328”;
PayloadVersion = 1;
SignerCertificates = ();})

You can then take action based on this type of information, allow you to either fill a database for agent-based management, or simply take action if something is missing, etc.

QueryInstalledProfiles covers user profiles. To see system, you’ll need installedProfiles:

/usr/libexec/mdmclient installedProfiles | grep "Profile Name"

Run without the grep for a considerably more verbose amount of information.

Finally, let’s look at one more piece of information, which is the hash for the iTunes Store. That’s a point I’ve made a number of times, that the iTunes account email address is never provided to an MDM, once associated to a device or user on a device. Instead, there’s a hash of the account. These are important with VPP, as it allows for reversing (according to the MDM) which users have claimed which apps, or which users are using a given app, as well as how many devices they’re accessing those from. To see a hash, as an MDM sees it:

/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryAppInstallation | grep iTunesStoreAccountHash

There’s a lot more you can do here, and I’m sure we’ll see a lot more over time. However, the work from @mosen combined with the opening up of the documentation on profiles and the mdm protocol helps to shed some light on how things work under the hood, and how we can use these features to provide greater programatic management for the Mac.

For example, to grab that iTuneshash from earlier, as a Jamf extension attribute you could use the following: https://github.com/krypted/ituneshash/blob/master/ituneshash.sh

April 28th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Here’s a new extension attribute at https://github.com/krypted/ituneshash/blob/master/ituneshash.sh for grabbing the hash ID used for iTunes Store accounts, useful with VPP:

#!/bin/sh
#
#
#
#Jamf Pro Extension Attribute to return the App Store Account Hash for iTunes
#Note that the return is null if one is not found
#
#
result=`/usr/libexec/mdmclient QueryAppInstallation | grep iTunesStoreAccountHash | sed '/.*\"\(.*\)\".*/ s//\1/g'`
echo "<result>$result</result>"

The output is something like:

<result>oBSmAAAa0nUAAACBHe5AaALlNBg=</result>

Which would bring the string into Jamf Pro

April 26th, 2017

Posted In: JAMF, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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April 23rd, 2017

Posted In: iPhone, MacAdmins Podcast, Mass Deployment

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MySQL usually pulls settings from a my.cnf file. However, you can end up with settings in include files, which can be defined in the my.cnf using the following directives:

include /home/mydir/myopt.cnf
includedir /home/mydir

Because of this, and the fact that you might not have access to all locations of .cnf files on a filesystem, you can also grab them using the SHOW VARIABLES option within SQL, obtained by

/usr/local/mysql/bin/mysql -uroot -p mypassword -e "SHOW VARIABLES;" > /tmp/SQLSettings.txt

In the above command, -uroot defines we’ll be accessing with the root user, -p defines the password (listed as mypassword) and the -e defines that we want to execute a command and then quit. We then use > to dump the output into the defined file.

April 21st, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, SQL

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10.12.4 gives us a new option to recheck enrollment via DEP! You can now use the -N flag to recheck a DEP configuration and, if a computer is not enrolled in the correct listing, move the enrollment. This should makes of r an ability to move devices between server, change the URL string in an enrollment profile, and recheck for the removal of an enrollment profile.

To use the option, simply run profiles with the -N option (with elevated privileges):

sudo profiles -N

For the Mac, there are a lot of ways to programmatically handle enrollment, so this is a nice new feature, but not a game changer. But, while not yet available in iOS, if the same functionality could be had with, say, a MDM command, then you would be able to migrate iOS devices between MDMs, provided you already put the data in place so policies ran as expected.

April 18th, 2017

Posted In: Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, Mac Security

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